Quickest way to improve my game ?

Cyrano-Lossi

Hi! Instead of suggesting one specific book,what really helped me improving my chess in +200 fide rating points in one year was the algorithm method. Sadly there is not so many reasources about it, only little fragments in many books, nothing complete, but I´m always explaining it to my students and getting good results with it. It sounds complex, but really isnt, it´s more a way of thinking, which is basic in chess and most players (including me) usually forget about when starting. Please feel free to write if you have any questions. happy.png

Facari

Thanks everyone for all the good tips ! 

I've writed everything in my notes and will try to go through each method before choosing which one is the best for me happy.png 

I've started do some puzzles yesterday and now on, i will review each of my games ^^ 

I've started "Chess fundamentals" (algebraic version) as well 

Facari
LichsGoodChessC0mBad a écrit :

You should play on Lichess instead, you'll see that your ELO will increase about 200-300~ points immediately. It's such a miracle!

Why should i go there ?

Lichess is better to analyse gameplay ? 

Cause if my elo increase just because people are less good on this website, i'm not interested xD

Facari
LichsGoodChessC0mBad a écrit :
Facari wrote:
LichsGoodChessC0mBad a écrit :

You should play on Lichess instead, you'll see that your ELO will increase about 200-300~ points immediately. It's such a miracle!

Why should i go there ?

Lichess is better to analyse gameplay ? 

Cause if my elo increase just because people are less good on this website, i'm not interested xD

Absolutely! Lichess is completely free and you can analyse your games for FREE! 

Oh ok thanks a lot i will check

kindaspongey

"... 'Chess Fundamentals' ... does not deal so minutely as this book will with the things that beginners need to know. ..." - from Capablanca's A Primer of Chess

Facari

kindaspongey a écrit :

"... 'Chess Fundamentals' ... does not deal so minutely as this book will with the things that beginners need to know. ..." - from Capablanca's A Primer of Chess

Uh... Compared to what ?

kindaspongey

Capablanca was comparing Chess Fundamentals and A Primer of Chess with each other.

ForeverBen85
Surely learning anything is only going to help you?

I would personally say to use the game analyser (not sure if outside of paid package) to work out where you might have gone wrong in a game.

I would also say to use the ELO only as a guide and not a definitive rating of your skill level.
Facari

kindaspongey a écrit :

Capablanca was comparing Chess Fundamentals and A Primer of Chess with each other.

Oh yeah i forgot this one sorry, will definitely go with this one thanks

Facari

iPandaJC a écrit :

Surely learning anything is only going to help you?

I would personally say to use the game analyser (not sure if outside of paid package) to work out where you might have gone wrong in a game.

I would also say to use the ELO only as a guide and not a definitive rating of your skill level.

Yeah elo is just an indicator of performance i know :) What i meant was : what's quicker between playing a lot of games or reading a lot ^^

ForeverBen85
Facari wrote:

 

iPandaJC a écrit :

Surely learning anything is only going to help you?

I would personally say to use the game analyser (not sure if outside of paid package) to work out where you might have gone wrong in a game.

I would also say to use the ELO only as a guide and not a definitive rating of your skill level.

Yeah elo is just an indicator of performance i know :) What i meant was : what's quicker between playing a lot of games or reading a lot ^^

 

Ah I see. I think a combination of both (I know this isn't what you want to hear)!

1_a31-0

I would recommend lots of long, over-the-board games, I find that practical experience tends to help me improve the most happy.png

kararGiovanna
Nice
1_a31-0
kararGiovanna wrote:
Nice

*joined 3 minutes ago*

Welcome to chess.com! happy.png 🇨🇦

kindaspongey
Facari wrote:
... what's quicker between playing a lot of games or reading a lot ^^

"... In order to maximize the benefits of [theory and practice], these two should be approached in a balanced manner. ... Play as many slow games (60 5 or preferably slower) as possible, ... The other side of improvement is theory. ... This can be reading books, taking lessons, watching videos, doing problems on software, etc. ..." - NM Dan Heisman (2002)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627084053/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman19.pdf

PatternRecognition

I win a lot of my games otb by not resigning in losing positions. People are afraid to continue attacking, or they overextend their pieces, or they don't pay attention as much. But sometimes you still lose.

PhysicsLearner0008

Hi again.. I am just here to clarify that the reason why sometimes i don't have much time for book study, has nothing to do with my chosen field whatsoever. It is something personal, though at the moment i wrote that, i am thinking in terms of being a student in general, and having to maintain good grades and study time, or if you are working throughout the day, but you really want to learn about chess.

In my experience, yes, i really want to learn about chess, and i have some target books that i want to read cover to cover, however, the moment i start, i seem to not find the ideal time to study usually because of being exhausted. then i found some chess in youtube covering the topics i want to learn and yea, i have seen that i have improved a lot, i have rosed from 1400+ to 1600+ in blitz 10min here in chess.com, even reached 1700+, after that though i have stopped and not played again for a few months..

 

If I may, I will just share some experience.. most of the time in my early playing, i play against computer program, adjusted toward my difficulty.. it has helped me play with carefulness and always avoiding blunders coz surely you'll be punishedhappy.png. however, against tactical attacks, it defends fairly well, which is kinda frustrating, if you want to attack the computer.. then i discovered something like accumulating an attack, without being too obvious that you are attacking it XD. and it works most of the time (depends on difficulty of computer level that is).

Also some of the chess people i know personally and play with sometimes (here in my country) they almost don't read nothin, and just play and play (because of their interest in chess), and they are very good players, even better than me rating wise. but yea, their weakness is maybe lacking few theory, but it makes me wonder where's the strength coming from? lol

kindaspongey

"... If it’s instruction, you look for an author that addresses players at your level (buying something that’s too advanced won’t help you at all). This means that a classic book that is revered by many people might not be useful for you. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (2015)
https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-best-chess-books-ever

Cyrano-Lossi

Hi! It would be a matter of looking at your real knowledge now. With most of my students we had to work on their basis and begin to teach them about the most important thing: how to think. Incredibly, most chess players dont really know how to do this, and when doing so we begin making less mistakes and of course, winning more games. Feel free to write me for any possible questions that might arise, this is a complex topic and specific for each person. Good luck! grin.png

Facari

Thanks to everyone for the help !