returning players

posh1gamer
So, in 5th grade, I was #2 in my school chess club (about 160 members) and I went to state tournament and MLK day tournament etc. point is I was a fairly decent player. this in the beginner thread though because I stopped playing after that year for some TERRIBLE reason and here I am, now 14, going into high school wondering how I should go about getting back into the game. I feel like a beginner again because my sense and awareness is gone. thanks in advance for any suggestions.
posh1gamer

I would also be awesome if an experienced player with discord stumbles upon this and is willing to play a few games with me and talk me through what and what not to do.

MangoMankey

Get started by playing some blitz (5-10 min is ideal). If possible, join an OTB chess club (high schools usually have one).

After playing enough games, you should have no trouble reaching your level back, and improving further. Good luck happy.png

I wouldn't suggest books until after you find that you have plataeued (meaning your rating remains roughly the same over 100 games or so). But it doesn't hurt to try to get some tactics practice if you have time (although still, playing games should be your first priority to begin with): https://chesstempo.com/ is the standard place for decent free tactics.

As a sidenote, you might find that you lose a lot of games (or say, get a lot of tactics wrong) initially - that's just the systems adjusting to your rating level - don't get discouraged by the first dozen or so games.

posh1gamer

MangoMankey wrote:

Get started by playing some blitz (5-10 min is ideal). If possible, join an OTB chess club (high schools usually have one).

After playing enough games, you should have no trouble reaching your level back, and improving further. Good luck happy.png

I wouldn't suggest books until after you find that you have plataeued (meaning your rating remains roughly the same over 100 games or so). But it doesn't hurt to try to get some tactics practice if you have time (although still, playing games should be your first priority to begin with): https://chesstempo.com/ is the standard place for decent free tactics.

As a sidenote, you might find that you lose a lot of games (or say, get a lot of tactics wrong) initially - that's just the systems adjusting to your rating level - don't get discouraged by the first dozen or so games.

thanks, I'll check out those tactics and make sure to get back on the game by game grind through the rankings. I like books but chess books typically bore me to death. the only one I've really enjoyed was "bobby Fischer teaches chess" and IDK if you can really call it a book.

eric0022
posh1gamer wrote:
So, in 5th grade, I was #2 in my school chess club (about 160 members) and I went to state tournament and MLK day tournament etc. point is I was a fairly decent player. this in the beginner thread though because I stopped playing after that year for some TERRIBLE reason and here I am, now 14, going into high school wondering how I should go about getting back into the game. I feel like a beginner again because my sense and awareness is gone. thanks in advance for any suggestions.

 

You can just play a few games first to familiarise yourself once again with how pieces work.

 

There was a period of time, several years ago, I had not touched my studies for more than two years. Of course I had already forgotten a significant proportion of my knowledge already. I returned to studying afterwards by first attending a quick refresher course, and suddenly I recalled a lot of what I had not touched during that period of time.

kindaspongey

"... for those that want to be as good as they can be, they'll have to work hard.
Play opponents who are better than you … . Learn basic endgames. Create a simple opening repertoire (understanding the moves are far more important than memorizing them). Study tactics. And pick up tons of patterns. That’s the drumbeat of success. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (December 27, 2018)
https://www.chess.com/article/view/little-things-that-help-your-game
https://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-start-out-in-chess
https://www.chess.com/news/view/a-new-years-resolution-improve-your-chess-with-new-lessons

https://www.chess.com/article/view/mastery-chess-lessons-are-here
"... In order to maximize the benefits of [theory and practice], these two should be approached in a balanced manner. ... Play as many slow games (60 5 or preferably slower) as possible, ... The other side of improvement is theory. ... This can be reading books, taking lessons, watching videos, doing problems on software, etc. ..." - NM Dan Heisman (2002)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627084053/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman19.pdf
"... If it’s instruction, you look for an author that addresses players at your level (buying something that’s too advanced won’t help you at all). This means that a classic book that is revered by many people might not be useful for you. ..." - IM Jeremy Silman (2015)
https://www.chess.com/article/view/the-best-chess-books-ever
Here are some reading possibilities that I often mention:
Simple Attacking Plans by Fred Wilson (2012)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090402/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review874.pdf
http://dev.jeremysilman.com/shop/pc/Simple-Attacking-Plans-77p3731.htm
Logical Chess: Move by Move by Irving Chernev (1957)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708104437/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/logichess.pdf
The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Irving Chernev (1965)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/most-instructive-games-of-chess-ever-played/
Winning Chess by Irving Chernev and Fred Reinfeld (1948)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708093415/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review919.pdf
Back to Basics: Tactics by Dan Heisman (2007)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708233537/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review585.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-back-to-basics-tactics
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5856bd64ff7c50433c3803db/t/5895fc0ca5790af7895297e4/1486224396755/btbtactics2excerpt.pdf
Discovering Chess Openings by GM John Emms (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf
Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro (2014)
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/05/review-of-pete-tamburros-openings-for.html
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/openings-for-amateurs/
https://www.mongoosepress.com/catalog/excerpts/openings_amateurs.pdf
Chess Endgames for Kids by Karsten Müller (2015)
https://chessbookreviews.wordpress.com/tag/chess-endgames-for-kids/
http://www.gambitbooks.com/pdfs/Chess_Endgames_for_Kids.pdf
A Guide to Chess Improvement by Dan Heisman (2010)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708105628/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review781.pdf
Studying Chess Made Easy by Andrew Soltis (2009)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708090448/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review750.pdf
Seirawan stuff:
http://seagaard.dk/review/eng/bo_beginner/ev_winning_chess.asp?KATID=BO&ID=BO-Beginner
http://www.nystar.com/tamarkin/review1.htm
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627132508/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen173.pdf
https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-winning-chess-endings
https://web.archive.org/web/20140708092617/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/review560.pdf

posh1gamer

ok, thanks, looks like I have my hands full tomorrow with all these links. :)