stalemate

samanthad92
I don’t understand the difference between checkmate and stalemate. Can someone help me understand? Thank you
baddogno

I'll try.  When a K is in check and can't move out of it, that's checkmate.  When a K isn't in check, but can't move anywhere he won't be in check, that's stalemate.  Hope that helped...

I'll try and find you some articles.

baddogno

https://support.chess.com/article/682-what-is-stalemate

baddogno

https://support.chess.com/article/475-how-can-i-learn-the-rules-of-chess

brisket

If my King is in check and I have no legal moves ie. remove the check then I am checkmated, if I am not in check, but I have no legal move I can make such that any move I make would move myself into check that would be a stalemate. 

krudsparov

In that first game, your opponent moved her K to protect the pawn, you weren't in check but you couldn't move, stalemate. If she'd moved Qa3 you would have been in check with nowhere to move, checkmate 

eric0022

That "check" and "no check" difference between a checkmate and a stalemate is the difference between a full point and a half point.

Cyrus-the-Virus

Stalemate is when you cannot move in any position without it being Check - but your opposite number failed to completely outwit you into a checkmate position! Imagine you would - you have a king as a last piece and its you move - if you move it left right up diagonally or down you will be Checked position - that sir/madame big dog you will be Stalemate!

SENSEI2842

Stalemate is where none of your pieces can move. 

SENSEI2842

Check mate is when your king cannot move and when your other pieces cannot block the checkmate 

MARattigan
SENSEI2842 wrote:

Check mate is when your king cannot move and when your other pieces cannot block the checkmate 

Or take the piece that is checking (assuming there is only one).

 

MARattigan

E.g.

Stalemate with Black to play but not with White to play. Any Black move would put the king into check which is illegal, but the king is not in check.

 

 

Checkmate. Any Black move would put the king into check which is illegal and the king is in check.

It has to be Black to move, because otherwise Black would have moved into check on the previous move which would have been illegal.

 

Not checkmate or stalemate because Black can take the queen. (Again it has to be Black to play.)

AthenaTheChessCub

This is no stalemate tough

Black can still. Move the bishop

MARattigan

And this is checkmate even though Black could block the bishop check with one queen or remove the checking knight with either, because the king would still be in check from the other piece. (It doesn't matter that the White king would also be in check.)


 

checkmateohwait

stalemate

checkmate

eric0022

 

versus

 

 

MARattigan
AthenaTheChessCub wrote:

This is no stalemate tough

Black can still. Move the bishop

It's not Black's move according to your FEN. It's not stalemate because White has legal moves (with either king or queen).

@checkmateohwait 

Your "stalemate" position is not stalemate for exactly the same reason.

@eric0022

You haven't committed yourself, but the first position is not stalemate because neither player is to move (it's already a dead position) but White has the move. It could legally arise only if the black king captured a bishop or knight on a8 with the last move.

hmchessuser

You get a stalemate when your opponent cannot move, but they are not in check.

eric0022
MARattigan wrote:
AthenaTheChessCub wrote:

This is no stalemate tough

Black can still. Move the bishop

It's not Black's move according to your FEN. It's not stalemate because White has legal moves (with either king or queen).

@checkmateohwait 

Your "stalemate" position is not stalemate for exactly the same reason.

@eric0022

You haven't committed yourself, but the first position is not stalemate because neither player is to move (it's already a dead position) but White has the move. It could legally arise only if the black king captured a bishop or knight on a8 with the last move.

 

Or it could arise if a White knight captures, say, some rook on d7 and it would currently be Black to move.

MARattigan
hmchessuser wrote:

You get a stalemate when your opponent cannot move, but they are not in check.

This is slightly inaccurate. Generally false when it's your move, for example, or if one of you has just resigned or you've agreed a draw, and in most dead positions - this for example -

White to move

 

would not be described as stalemate even though neither players opponent can move (because the game has terminated) and neither players opponent is in check.