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Struggling to Improve

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llama36
BadZen wrote:
nMsALpg wrote:

 

One guy told me when he was still fairly new (and rated 1600) he could play up to 4 blindfold games at the same time... so definitely I think there are physiological (dis)advantages  and limits for people. My ability to calculate has improved over the years, but when I play a blindfold game I'm not "seeing" it any better than when I was about 1300 (in fact I don't really "see" the board at all... hard to explain). Meanwhile others tell me when they play blindfold they see an actual board with pieces... and when I question them a few times, they emphasize they really do see a board (and I definitely don't).


There's a guy right now on another forum post that has been playing half the time I have (ie. since 2019) and went from 600 to 2100 rapid.  I'm.... still at 600.   He describes what he's been doing to train, and it's just depressing - so painfully obvious that there is natural inborn chess talent an I just don't have a drop of it, he gets ten times the result for way less effort.

IDK if you're serious about checking in once a week or whatever I'd be interested / would stick around for that, but it's probably a total waste of your time, I'm hopeless.  =/

Yeah, that's how I define talent, as a multiplier for work. It's painfully obvious that if you take 1000 people, and have them all do the same thing (whether it's chess, or sports, or speaking a new language etc) that there will be a wide range of proficiency at the end. There's no such thing as getting better without work... but some people improve a lot for just a little.

Let me look at some of your games, and maybe think about what would be interesting as exercise / homework and you could let me know if it sounds useful... of course it's easier if we lived near each other, set up a board, and point at squares while talking, but that's unlikely to be possible.

Habanababananero
BadZen kirjoitti:
Habanababananero wrote:

I can not believe that 1900 puzzle rating is possible without visualizing.


Ok, you must be right then and I'm just confused.  I really don't talk puzzles through instead of visualizing, because you say it's impossible, and I'm really secretly very good at visualizing but don't know it because I'm totally unaware that I do it or anything that's going on in my head ever.

In addition, the time and effort I spent figuring out mathematically how puzzles are different from games was totally wasted and I must be wrong about that too, because you say it's just the same, and there's no arguing with Habanababananero's gut feeling on this subject, it's definitely correct.

This all makes sense and is definitely the most likely explanation, thanks for letting me know.  This has been super-helpful in every way, I'm glad it just took finally meeting someone with such impeccable logic to let me know everything I was experiencing was a fake lie and thereby solving all my problems.  

You should be a therapist.  Have a great day.

OK.

llama36

Eh, your games are better than I expected... you're resigning pretty early in some of them.

Habanababananero

Sorry for being rude, but you were rude to me first.

I still do not get how one talks through puzzles. I mean I just do not understand how that could work without visualizing, but if it does, do it the same way when you play a game.

It is the same board and the same pieces, so if you can do it by ”talking through them” in puzzles, just use the same method.

Habanababananero
nMsALpg kirjoitti:

Eh, your games are better than I expected... you're resigning pretty early in some of them.

Looked at the stats just now also. 96,3 % of the lost games were lost by resignation.

Forget all earlier tips BadZen and just try not resigning all the time.

Koridai

If you want to improve, play at least 4 hours per day with max 1 day break per week. Keep this up for a year. There is no way that you won't improve. 

There is a simple reason for this, the improvement part of your brain is an engine, you first need to turn it on by playing chess at least 2 months. After that you slowly will improve. But if you stop, the engine goes down and you will lose allot of skill in the process. 

Than it again takes 2 months to start the improvement part of your brain again.

The reason super GM's are so high is that they didn't stop the improvement part of their brain many times(if they had many breaks, they wouldn't be as good as they are). It is okay to take a break for several months for your health, but it is actually very bad for your chess skill.

Habanababananero
Koridai kirjoitti:

If you want to improve, play at least 4 hours per day with max 1 day break per week. Keep this up for a year. There is no way that you won't improve. 

There is a simple reason for this, the improvement part of your brain is an engine, you first need to turn it on by playing chess at least 2 months. After that you slowly will improve. But if you stop, the engine goes down and you will lose allot of skill in the process. 

Than it again takes 2 months to start the improvement part of your brain again.

The reason super GM's are so high is that they didn't stop the improvement part of their brain many times(if they had many breaks, they wouldn't be as good as they are). It is okay to take a break for several months for your health, but it is actually very bad for your chess skill.

I am quite sure this is not the optimal way.

if you use 50% of the time studying, doing puzzles and so on, improvement should be faster.

JinxklyTheOpossum
BadZen wrote:
JinxklyTheOpossum wrote:

Watch Gotham's video about making counterplay. It gave me like 100 elo ( or 200 idk)  now i'm knocking at the 800 rated door ( I was a 600 before I watched it )


Could you link the one you mean?   There are 4 or 5 with "Counterplay" in the title on youtube...

https://youtu.be/goW1cFHaxtU  here you go

 

JinxklyTheOpossum

Also when you're studying chess you actually have to determined to learn and accept your mistakes or you can't really do much progress. Try to study some principles and maybe watch videos about chess tips for beginners. You have to study hard but don't burn yourself out.

laurengoodkindchess

Hi! My name is Lauren Goodkind and I’m a respected  chess coach and chess YouTuber who helps beginners out : 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP5SPSG_sWSYPjqJYMNwL_Q

Send me one of your games and I'll be happy to analyze the game for free on my YouTube channel on Sunday livestream from 1-2PM PST.  Ask me questions in real time!  

 

 This is a great way to improve!

 

Here’s more  ideas to help you get better.  

-I recommend two books for you: “50 Poison Pieces”   and “Queen For A Day: The Girl’s Guide To Chess Mastery.”  Both books are available on Amazon.com.  Both books are endorsed by chess masters!  

-If you are serious about chess, I highly recommend you hiring a chess coach to help you.  

-Also consider all checks and captures on your side and also your opponent’s side. Always as, “If I move here, where is my opponent going to move?”. Do this for every single move!  

-Play with a slow time control, such as G/30 so you have plenty of time to think before every move. 

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