What are your challenges as an adult player trying to improve?

Da-Vere
Antonin1957 wrote:
MSteen wrote:

Though I have plenty of time as a retiree, my top challenge is my age--69. Though I am still sharp and in very good health, I know that my best years for serious improvement are long past. However, I am finding great enjoyment in playing daily games, going over master games, increasing my tactics score, and taking the lessons here on chess.com. Also, the hundreds of videos on YouTube provide endless entertainment. 

How much can I really expect to improve now? Realistically, not much. But with age comes wisdom, and wisdom tells me that getting hours of enjoyment out of a hobby that I love is far more important than adding a few ratings points.

I agree 1000% percent. I'm 63 and hope that in 580+ days I will still be alive to join the ranks of the retired. 

Awesome! I agree. It’s not about time, responsibilities, etc for me. I’ve studied codes for a long time and frankly, I’m sick of studying. But as @Msteen so aptly said, “But with age comes wisdom, and wisdom tells me that getting hours of enjoyment out of a hobby that I love is far more important than adding a few ratings points.” 

Couldn’t have said It better...

Amateur1991
GM_Dipankar007 escreveu:

Hello everyone,

Just curious what are the challenges that adult beginners are facing? As an adult player myself, I know that most of us have job and family commitments. Finding enough time to play or improve chess can be a serious challenge. Any other challenges/issues?

About myself, I'm a Chess coach with multiple adult students and I've been able to help them improve their playing strength. I'm not fishing for students here. Just wanting to help.

 At the age of 29 I half gave up trying to improve. Personally I never got any challenge, but there was a time I used to read multiple books, do tactics daily etc.

Da-Vere
SeniorPatzer wrote:

Feeling guilty for studying chess when there are things undone on my wife's list.

If a man says he’ll do something he means it. He doesn’t need to be reminded every six or seven months about it. Wait, i don’t think that helps does it?

jerbruhdude

will you sub to me

 

magictwanger

I retired 3 years ago,thank God.I restarted Chess back then and only knew basic moves,at the time.The study/video/tactics "thing" is a pleasure for me,now that I don't have the angst of running my business anymore.

I figure I'll get as good as I'll get with no worries about ratings etc.

I love the game.That pretty much does it for me.

I certainly know more now than back then,so I'm a happy camper.Good luck to all.

Bill_Cook
SeniorPatzer wrote:

Feeling guilty for studying chess when there are things undone on my wife's list.

Yep, totally get that.

I used to - or walAs well, i have challenges through being 70, having a heart condition that means not enough oxygenated blood reaches my muscles ( or brain!). I just can't think as well as I used to.  But then, I used to be able to run..............

So it goes.  And with age, it does go...

 

jjupiter6

As a teacher, a student who studied post grad mathematics in my 40s and married a woman whose first language was not English, I can say that the adult brain does not retain information as easily as a child. I would fully understand a maths concepts one night, come back to do some exercises using the concept learned and come up blank. It would take several nights to get it to really sink in. I've now forgotten it all. I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I'm not dumb either.