Can someone help me analyze my game

kertandidi

 

Blablabla077

Analyze your game using chess.com analysis or there is another site called decodechess......They would tell u more variations and the best moves

ArtNJ

Some of the stuff I saw in a quick skim:
7.  ... re8 ignores the threat of bxf7 which your opponent also missed.  7. ... na5 is one good answer.
12. ...nxf5 opens the gfile to give attack against your king.  White isn't well developed compared to you or castled, so the usual thematic remedy is to open the center.  12. ...d5! gives you the better position despite being a pawn down.  
13. ...rb8.  Whenever you see a pawn guarded this way, your instinct should be that the move is probably wrong.  D5 is still correct.  The tactics are complicated, but the general principle that its sometimes better to try and fight than curl into a ball and call for momma is one that can be learned.  I'm exaggerating obviously -- once in a blue moon even grandmasters play rb8 to guard the pawn in certain positions, but for the most part, its wrong, better to let the pawn go and use the move otherwise.  
17.  ...nxe4!!! missed tactic

Rest of the game is basically just tactics after this, so you can look at it with stockfish.  

kertandidi
ArtNJ wrote:

Some of the stuff I saw in a quick skim:
7.  ... re8 ignores the threat of bxf7 which your opponent also missed.  7. ... na5 is one good answer.
12. ...nxf5 opens the gfile to give attack against your king.  White isn't well developed compared to you or castled, so the usual thematic remedy is to open the center.  12. ...d5! gives you the better position despite being a pawn down.  
13. ...rb8.  Whenever you see a pawn guarded this way, your instinct should be that the move is probably wrong.  D5 is still correct.  The tactics are complicated, but the general principle that its sometimes better to try and fight than curl into a ball and call for momma is one that can be learned.  I'm exaggerating obviously -- once in a blue moon even grandmasters play rb8 to guard the pawn in certain positions, but for the most part, its wrong, better to let the pawn go and use the move otherwise.  
17.  ...nxe4!!! missed tactic

Rest of the game is basically just tactics after this, so you can look at it with stockfish.  

thank you so much, this was helpful

Redgreenorangeyellow
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
 

 

I saw someone else who gave you other technical suggestions, so here are some suggestions on how you can improve your play. First of all, I noticed that you took a rather passive approach to your game. You kind of waited for your opponent to make a mistake at his own leisure rather than trying to create some threats. A general rule of thumb is to just be annoying and shove all your pieces are deep into your opponent's position as possible (within reason). Just work on making sure that you try to incorporate as much active play as possible.  

Laskersnephew

To expand on ArtNJ 's excellent, but brief analysis

 

kertandidi
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
 

 

I saw someone else who gave you other technical suggestions, so here are some suggestions on how you can improve your play. First of all, I noticed that you took a rather passive approach to your game. You kind of waited for your opponent to make a mistake at his own leisure rather than trying to create some threats. A general rule of thumb is to just be annoying and shove all your pieces are deep into your opponent's position as possible (within reason). Just work on making sure that you try to incorporate as much active play as possible.  

I'm worried of my pieces being trapped, forked, pinned, skewered, etc. how do you attack without missing tactics?

kertandidi
Laskersnephew wrote:

To expand on ArtNJ 's excellent, but brief analysis

 

Thank you! I made a lot of mistakes sad.png hopefully I can fix them soon

Redgreenorangeyellow
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
 

 

I saw someone else who gave you other technical suggestions, so here are some suggestions on how you can improve your play. First of all, I noticed that you took a rather passive approach to your game. You kind of waited for your opponent to make a mistake at his own leisure rather than trying to create some threats. A general rule of thumb is to just be annoying and shove all your pieces are deep into your opponent's position as possible (within reason). Just work on making sure that you try to incorporate as much active play as possible.  

I'm worried of my pieces being trapped, forked, pinned, skewered, etc. how do you attack without missing tactics?

Well, when you're attacking, you're the one who is going to be creating tactical potential. Your opponents, especially at you level, lack defensive skills. Attacking is way easier than defending, but to make sure you have a good attack, you must make sure that you have the resources immediately available to attack, that your king is safe so that no easy counter-attacks are possible, and that there are no easy defensive resources available. 

Furthermore, I never said for you to be an attacking player. Some people like risky attacks, others don't. However, you need to create viable threats that prevent your opponent from carrying out their plans and so that you can carry out your own. My idea of threats is not in the exact way you are probably imaging it. I don't mean full on forced checkmating threats (although those are indeed viable threats), but threats which make your opponent take action against them. For example, if you see a really strong outpost for a knight and proceed to maneuver your knight to that square, your opponent will have to try doing something about it. It can even be as simple as attacking a piece (now, don't go attacking pieces for no reason; always have a reason) which is on a good square so it is forced to move!

I hope this helps. I myself am even working on creating more threats. 

kertandidi
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
 

 

I saw someone else who gave you other technical suggestions, so here are some suggestions on how you can improve your play. First of all, I noticed that you took a rather passive approach to your game. You kind of waited for your opponent to make a mistake at his own leisure rather than trying to create some threats. A general rule of thumb is to just be annoying and shove all your pieces are deep into your opponent's position as possible (within reason). Just work on making sure that you try to incorporate as much active play as possible.  

I'm worried of my pieces being trapped, forked, pinned, skewered, etc. how do you attack without missing tactics?

Well, when you're attacking, you're the one who is going to be creating tactical potential. Your opponents, especially at you level, lack defensive skills. Attacking is way easier than defending, but to make sure you have a good attack, you must make sure that you have the resources immediately available to attack, that your king is safe so that no easy counter-attacks are possible, and that there are no easy defensive resources available. 

Furthermore, I never said for you to be an attacking player. Some people like risky attacks, others don't. However, you need to create viable threats that prevent your opponent from carrying out their plans and so that you can carry out your own. My idea of threats is not in the exact way you are probably imaging it. I don't mean full on forced checkmating threats (although those are indeed viable threats), but threats which make your opponent take action against them. For example, if you see a really strong outpost for a knight and proceed to maneuver your knight to that square, your opponent will have to try doing something about it. It can even be as simple as attacking a piece (now, don't go attacking pieces for no reason; always have a reason) which is on a good square so it is forced to move!

I hope this helps. I myself am even working on creating more threats. 

Do you know whose games I should study to help improve attacking plans or is studying master games out of my reach?

Redgreenorangeyellow
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
Redgreenorangeyellow wrote:
DarkBubblyFarm wrote:
 

 

I saw someone else who gave you other technical suggestions, so here are some suggestions on how you can improve your play. First of all, I noticed that you took a rather passive approach to your game. You kind of waited for your opponent to make a mistake at his own leisure rather than trying to create some threats. A general rule of thumb is to just be annoying and shove all your pieces are deep into your opponent's position as possible (within reason). Just work on making sure that you try to incorporate as much active play as possible.  

I'm worried of my pieces being trapped, forked, pinned, skewered, etc. how do you attack without missing tactics?

Well, when you're attacking, you're the one who is going to be creating tactical potential. Your opponents, especially at you level, lack defensive skills. Attacking is way easier than defending, but to make sure you have a good attack, you must make sure that you have the resources immediately available to attack, that your king is safe so that no easy counter-attacks are possible, and that there are no easy defensive resources available. 

Furthermore, I never said for you to be an attacking player. Some people like risky attacks, others don't. However, you need to create viable threats that prevent your opponent from carrying out their plans and so that you can carry out your own. My idea of threats is not in the exact way you are probably imaging it. I don't mean full on forced checkmating threats (although those are indeed viable threats), but threats which make your opponent take action against them. For example, if you see a really strong outpost for a knight and proceed to maneuver your knight to that square, your opponent will have to try doing something about it. It can even be as simple as attacking a piece (now, don't go attacking pieces for no reason; always have a reason) which is on a good square so it is forced to move!

I hope this helps. I myself am even working on creating more threats. 

Do you know whose games I should study to help improve attacking plans or is studying master games out of my reach?

Look at literally any grandmaster game from the 1800s.

Laskersnephew

"I'm worried of my pieces being trapped, forked, pinned, skewered, etc. how do you attack without missing tactics?"

Sometimes you don't! Sometimes you make mistakes and lose. One important part of chess improvement is getting over a fear of losing. So what if you lose a game or two? Nakamura, Caruana, Carlsen, they all lost hundreds of games growing up. Losing an occasional game or a few rating points means nothing if you lose trying to play good chess. You simply can't get good playing from fear!