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Hi everyone, could you tell me the most serious errors i did in this game (i'm a noob)?

Cristian_007
Baptiste972 ha scritto:

On move 4, knight c3 instead of c3 wins a pawn after queen takes d4 queens recapture, protected by the knight.

After that a couple of blunders I think and you keep  your king way too exposed.

But nice comeback, you got the fighting spirit that's the main thing at this level I think.

Yeah, fighting spirit, i think i have some, but many times i lose the nerve and i forget about pieces or the strategies my opponent wants to do moving his pieces. But yes, since i started to play chess i understood that the game needs also a balanced mentality. Thank you.

Cristian_007
BeastModeLTU ha scritto:
Try to not move a piece 2 times before move 10, focus on fighting for that piece by defending it with ohters. If the opponent offers you a free pawn in the first 5 moves, its most likely a gambit or an opening. You should try to focus more on king safety and developing other pieces

Interesting idea/strategy, i will pay attention in the next matches about not moving twice a piece before move 10, thank you so much.

Cristian_007
Game_of_Pawns ha scritto:

That first puzzle is taken from at least the fifth move in a row where Black can take that Bishop for free. The following two moves he can also take it for free but doesn't. At least seven moves in a row Black decides to not take that Bishop for free and then he moves straight onto hanging his Queen for two moves in a row. Kindly White never took it on either move and we're now talking about your second puzzle.

 

FYI QxQ wins the Bishop too, which is the move that Black managed to miss at least seven times.

 

Just so everybody knows, the OP posted an almost identical thread to this one the day before he posted this. He got the same advice in that. He also never replied after his OP. He doesn't listen. He doesn't reply. He doesn't deserve any help.

Hi, thank you for the time spent on writing under my post and helping me, i didn't mean to be rude not responding to your answers but i didn't log since now because i was busy.

Thank you for the analysis and for the study method, this is an important thing that i never do, I should play less dozens of random games in hope to become better without understanding what are the mistakes i do. 

Also i don't have any theoretical basis, in fact all i learned is from the matches i played here and some problems/quiz.

Game_of_Pawns
Cristian_007 wrote:

Hi, thank you for the time spent on writing under my post and helping me, i didn't mean to be rude not responding to your answers but i didn't log since now because i was busy.

You've played seven rapid games of chess on this site already today. You seem to have responded to me calling you out though, so that's good.

 

This will help you to play this opening better: The Principles of the Opening | Chess for Beginners - Chess.com

Cristian_007
Game_of_Pawns ha scritto:
Cristian_007 wrote:

Hi, thank you for the time spent on writing under my post and helping me, i didn't mean to be rude not responding to your answers but i didn't log since now because i was busy.

You've played seven rapid games of chess on this site already today. You seem to have responded to me calling you out though, so that's good.

 

This will help you to play this opening better: The Principles of the Opening | Chess for Beginners - Chess.com

Last question, i don't want to bore you, next time i ask for suggestions for one of my matches do i have to open a new thread or simply post it here?

Game_of_Pawns

It's not boring. I'm always happy to help people who are putting in the effort themselves. I think most people feel the same way.

 

You can do either, to be honest. If it was me, I would probably create a new thread most of the time.

bouffalou

People here are chess enthusiast willing to answer. Don't worry about "asking too much questions" or such.

MelvinGarvey

In chess, principles are good servants but poor masters. Don't give principles more respect than they deserve: play Russian, concrete, realistic: a move is playable or is not.

Occupying the center is a poor goal, when occupying is not controling, and when too many pawns in the center can become a vulnerable and embarrassing source of trouble when your opponent wisely siege them.

As for developping pieces, what a joke, most known oppenings have got lines where this one principle is superbly ignored. No, you won't learn anything more than hating these principles by trying to live and play under their ruling.

Play what you feel is right, and see the consequences, then, adjust when needed.

Play what you understand, until you understand better. But take a dear lesson from every game lost, preferably other than "I should have paid better attention and not give my pieces and pawns for free".

koishi

Not sure if my feedback would still be a help since I think everyone already covered the errors you did in this game. Your opening isn't the greatest at all since you developed your Queen first, which is a lot beginners often do. Developing your Queen early on would only make it as an easy target for your opponent's minor pieces: for example, that Nf6 move during the 9th move where you had to forcefully retreat your Queen back to its starting position while at the same time, your opponent was able to develop that Knight. You also ruined your King's side pawn structure that you castled in. Your middlegame was pretty fine, you were able to take advantage of your opponent's blunders hence winning the game. 

Learning a proper opening would really help you avoid those errors. Remember to always develop your minor pieces (Knights and Bishops) first before your major pieces. At the same time, you should also prioritize your King's safety by castling to a side where your pawn structures aren't janky. Never create a weakness for your King by advancing the pawn that is protecting him. 

:3

MelvinGarvey

Don't develop your minor pieces for the sake of developing. In many openings, the Queen's Bishop is best as a reserve and should be left on it's original square. Never forget: "connecting the Rooks" is a made up principle, that actually obey to no reality at all.

If you Castle Short (which is advised until you really know what you're doing), using the f pawn as an attacking device is a sound choice. Only beware to what can happen with the lines you open. See what goes on when your opponent tries to take advantage of it, and figure out some stuff for next time, in order to prevent it: be creative, learn, die, repeat.

MelvinGarvey

If they "ruin" your pawn structure, use the open files you get for it. In chess like in many other things, one doesn't get anything without giving anything.

See that for an example:

 

Use what ever is on the board, and like Korchnoï "The Wresler" (World's vice Champion) used to say: "Believe in your position". Your position has hidden ressources, find them, and use them!

MelvinGarvey

Many openings were created, in order to counter and contradict "opening principles" they all want you to obey and follow. If it feels stupid, it's probably stupid, and your move is problably better than theirs. Until proven otherwise.

qaedaduxky

you played the game your not cool enough to play chess

eric0022
qaedaduxky wrote:

you played the game your not cool enough to play chess

 

Says the user whose account was only created about 1 hour ago.

eric0022

I notice that during the game, Black made a lot of checks and most of the checks arose when the chance to give checks safely appeared. Finally Black gave a check on an unfortunate square (horizontal moves are hard to see sometimes!).

 

Giving checks would be good, but not all the time.

 

White played calmly and took the chance when it appeared. As a whole, White did well considering that the ratings of both players were under 750.

ArisDaniel201

You were lucky the opennent didn't see that he/she was giving the Queen

EKAFC

Analyze your games

Cristian_007
MelvinGarvey ha scritto:

In chess, principles are good servants but poor masters. Don't give principles more respect than they deserve: play Russian, concrete, realistic: a move is playable or is not.

Occupying the center is a poor goal, when occupying is not controling, and when too many pawns in the center can become a vulnerable and embarrassing source of trouble when your opponent wisely siege them.

As for developping pieces, what a joke, most known oppenings have got lines where this one principle is superbly ignored. No, you won't learn anything more than hating these principles by trying to live and play under their ruling.

Play what you feel is right, and see the consequences, then, adjust when needed.

Play what you understand, until you understand better. But take a dear lesson from every game lost, preferably other than "I should have paid better attention and not give my pieces and pawns for free".

Thank you very much. I will follow your advices.

 
Tadas03
Cristian_007 wrote:
BeastModeLTU ha scritto:
Try to not move a piece 2 times before move 10, focus on fighting for that piece by defending it with ohters. If the opponent offers you a free pawn in the first 5 moves, its most likely a gambit or an opening. You should try to focus more on king safety and developing other pieces

Interesting idea/strategy, i will pay attention in the next matches about not moving twice a piece before move 10, thank you so much.

Happy to help, the not moving a piece twice idea is from IM Daniel Rench’s video about the basics of chess. I reccomend watching that, its the simplest stuff but with ideas and theories like this. The series is called  “Everything you need to know about chess”