How to win truly won games?

osdeving

In this game my advantage had a peak of 3 pawns and 1 rook. I play thinking "WHY is this guy still playing?". In CC there are many players like this, especially with ratings between 1800-2000. I know you should not give up so soon, but here they exaggerate (lol)! This insistence takes my attention and I lose. It's better to play when I'm losing, at least I'm aware.

Has anyone here gone through this phase?
Is it really a phase, present in transition from class B to A (1600-1800 to 1800-1900) or is it an individual characteristic of mine? How to deal with it, what is the antidote? This is getting more and more frequent. in 3 minutes games when I get this kind of advantage I desire resign (sometimes I resign literally), I know I can not win within 1 minute lol


cyboo
Hey. Your opponent still has a queen and a bishop. He should feel justified in continuing to play.
osdeving
cyboo escreveu:
Hey. Your opponent still has a queen and a bishop. He should feel justified in continuing to play.

Oh, no, he are totally right. My question is how to deal with this?

Carlsen make some comments about the olympiad:

"This is the danger. Also in this game the clock is ticking down, I think there are now 11 moves to go to the time control, and if you don’t find something you can get paralysed, and you just sit there and you’re thinking, “where is my win?” instead of just doing something practical that preserves a large chunk of your advantage. That’s how you lose!"

I think this psychological side is inevitable. time pressure, obligation to win, opponent refusing to draw i draw position, etc. No
magic formula.

I'm a online player, no
experience in tournaments, and i'm getting better, playing with more tough opponents:  both in play and attitudes. No more games purely for fun. 

DeirdreSkye

   A large part of chess is experience. You don't give up when you lose and you don't give up when you win. You never think that it's over and you do your best. It's not easy but the more games you will play the easier it becomes. Eventually it doesn't matter if the position is equal or if you are winning because you are able to do your best in either case. 

     Often improving your ability to think and your overall understanding , also improves several other skills like speed chess. Chess is a complicated game and there are no easy answers.

  If you want to win the won games learn to play unaffected by the position evaluation.

  If you want to play better blitz , learn to think more and play long time control games.

osdeving

I am learning. In the last 2 months here at CC I had an almost traumatic experience with players who did not resign in lost position and / or players who made it harder to play.
I have no experience with this, apparently I already started to play chess with 1600 rating (lol?), I do not remember one day having 1200,1300,1400 ... And here when I play these players they know a lot more about chess than I imagined and the players with 1800-2000 make my life on the board a real hell and I confess I was very nervous at first.

But I'm adapting to not think I'll have an easy game ..

My theory is that CC has a lot of tournament players and the sites I've played are more common hobbyist, so it's not important for them to try to win or draw at any cost (it would be the case if it was a tournament game).

In part I find it humiliating to be in a totally lost position, so when my opponent finds himself in this position there is some kind of empathy, but that is my philosophy, the important thing is that I am adapting!

In any case, I doubt that a GM would let the opponent mate him. So I think there's a bit of arrogance from the players. They hope you will make a mistake. (and this is usually the case with players up to 2200). If I play against a player of 2100 with my singles 1900 he will probably play with queen less with me hoping to reverse the disadvantage lol.

Alltheusernamestaken
osdeving wrote:

In this game my advantage had a peak of 3 pawns and 1 rook. I play thinking "WHY is this guy still playing?". In CC there are many players like this, especially with ratings between 1800-2000. I know you should not give up so soon, but here they exaggerate (lol)! This insistence takes my attention and I lose. It's better to play when I'm losing, at least I'm aware.

Has anyone here gone through this phase?
Is it really a phase, present in transition from class B to A (1600-1800 to 1800-1900) or is it an individual characteristic of mine? How to deal with it, what is the antidote? This is getting more and more frequent. in 3 minutes games when I get this kind of advantage I desire resign (sometimes I resign literally), I know I can not win within 1 minute lol


You did a big mistake hanging the queen but you was totally wining

CalpiognaChess

This is a typical blitz game. Your opponent wanted really to attack and this creates adrenaline in the blood. Is like a football player: he can not stop to attack although his team is loosing 0-3. I personally think that in blitz if someone wants to beat me, he has to give me mate. About the game you are showing: that's a very nice game, you played very well (except some errors) but honestly speaking I don't see a moment where white had to resign. Diagonal a1-h8 is very week for black; Ra8 did not played (you played without a rook). Be1 , Qg3  f6  you did probably 3 errors. But it's ok, that is a blitz and you have to play fast, so is normal to do mistakes and it is normal that one doesn't resign till the situation is very clearly lost. 

CalpiognaChess
osdeving ha scritto:

I am learning. In the last 2 months here at CC I had an almost traumatic experience with players who did not resign in lost position and / or players who made it harder to play.
I have no experience with this, apparently I already started to play chess with 1600 rating (lol?), I do not remember one day having 1200,1300,1400 ... And here when I play these players they know a lot more about chess than I imagined and the players with 1800-2000 make my life on the board a real hell and I confess I was very nervous at first.

But I'm adapting to not think I'll have an easy game ..

My theory is that CC has a lot of tournament players and the sites I've played are more common hobbyist, so it's not important for them to try to win or draw at any cost (it would be the case if it was a tournament game).

In part I find it humiliating to be in a totally lost position, so when my opponent finds himself in this position there is some kind of empathy, but that is my philosophy, the important thing is that I am adapting!

In any case, I doubt that a GM would let the opponent mate him. So I think there's a bit of arrogance from the players. They hope you will make a mistake. (and this is usually the case with players up to 2200). If I play against a player of 2100 with my singles 1900 he will probably play with queen less with me hoping to reverse the disadvantage lol.

Yes osdeving, as you wrote, your problem is that you are nervous. A blitz game is not like a classical one. What you wrote in not true: chess players don't hope for a mistake of his opponent in a lost position, chess players they just have to play fast, because in blitz if you don't play fast you loose by time. In a classical game is totally different. You have time to think at you position, and if you realize that is completely lost, you resign. So in conclusion: blitz players they don't resign in a lost position, just becuase they not clearly realize they are lost and at the same time adrenaline in the blood let you be like a gladiator (I will play till the end). My suggestion is: chess is only game. Try to relax, enjoy the nice moves of your opponent; he is not your enemy. Chess is just a sport.

Daniel1115

If you end up losing, now u know why. Getting up on material is half the job, converting is the other half. Why should you be entitled to a resignation once u go up X amount of material?

Daniel1115

Also I stopped playing daily a long time ago, so I don't really know the conversion, as daily. ratings are highly inflated, 1600-1800 is not class a for daily

MickinMD

I've never gotten angry because an opponent plays a losing position out to the end: it's his/her right to do so.

I've won games where I'm in a seriously bad position but lured my opponent to grab a rook to get out of position and I play a great combination that wins, so I often don't give up until it's clear I can't pull off any surprises before I'm mated.

osdeving
CalpiognaChess escreveu:
osdeving ha scritto:

I am learning. In the last 2 months here at CC I had an almost traumatic experience with players who did not resign in lost position and / or players who made it harder to play.
I have no experience with this, apparently I already started to play chess with 1600 rating (lol?), I do not remember one day having 1200,1300,1400 ... And here when I play these players they know a lot more about chess than I imagined and the players with 1800-2000 make my life on the board a real hell and I confess I was very nervous at first.

But I'm adapting to not think I'll have an easy game ..

My theory is that CC has a lot of tournament players and the sites I've played are more common hobbyist, so it's not important for them to try to win or draw at any cost (it would be the case if it was a tournament game).

In part I find it humiliating to be in a totally lost position, so when my opponent finds himself in this position there is some kind of empathy, but that is my philosophy, the important thing is that I am adapting!

In any case, I doubt that a GM would let the opponent mate him. So I think there's a bit of arrogance from the players. They hope you will make a mistake. (and this is usually the case with players up to 2200). If I play against a player of 2100 with my singles 1900 he will probably play with queen less with me hoping to reverse the disadvantage lol.

Yes osdeving, as you wrote, your problem is that you are nervous. A blitz game is not like a classical one. What you wrote in not true: chess players don't hope for a mistake of his opponent in a lost position, chess players they just have to play fast, because in blitz if you don't play fast you loose by time. In a classical game is totally different. You have time to think at you position, and if you realize that is completely lost, you resign. So in conclusion: blitz players they don't resign in a lost position, just becuase they not clearly realize they are lost and at the same time adrenaline in the blood let you be like a gladiator (I will play till the end). My suggestion is: chess is only game. Try to relax, enjoy the nice moves of your opponent; he is not your enemy. Chess is just a sport.

You're right on several points.

1) Yes, the bishop on the big diagonal cost me 6 moves, it was really dangerous. But I think I did a good job from move 20 to 26 in neutralizing the bishop (Bb2 has Bc3). In addition I was able to decentralize the queen and disconnect the rook and queen with Be1. But of course, now I see that if I did not have time to activate my rooks it was because he had a good latent counter-attack (my mistake was f6, when I finally had time I made a passive move, psychologically speaking I was still not sure with Bb2 and f6 looked pretty good, I did not see entry in h6!).

2) Yes, in fact blitz we have that adrenaline. We tend to see only opportunities. The lull tends to never happen. It has occurred to me to make a series of exchanges and in the end I realize that I'm with one less piece. When that happens I joke in the chat "now we can count the pieces!".

3) It's true that I get nervous, but there is no chess player who does not get nervous in blitz. Watch the videos of Carlsen playing blitz and you will see that he gets very nervous. There is a video that he puts the king in a square and after releasing the piece he try to put him in another square: in pure adrenaline. He was not morally cheat, he did it by reflex , as soon as he released the piece he saw that he lost.

My conclusion is: thats ok, my blunder was because high energy used to neutralize white counter-attack. White should not resign, I choose wrong game to illustrate my point.

greenpencil999

I am looking at moves 21 - 25 or so, where it seems you are intent on trying to exchange queens while your rook at a8 remains out of the game.  At that point you have a material advantage of exchange plus some pawns but you are not making any use of that material advantage.  Instead of chasing his queen around, maybe Rac8 and c5 - c4 makes use of your extra material.  Extra material means nothing if you don't use it.

And I think 21...Be1 is a mistake. What is the B accomplishing there?  Bring it back to g7 to protect your king, control the long diagonal and prevent entry on h6.

IMBacon

 

osdeving
greenpencil999 escreveu:

I am looking at moves 21 - 25 or so, where it seems you are intent on trying to exchange queens while your rook at a8 remains out of the game.  At that point you have a material advantage of exchange plus some pawns but you are not making any use of that material advantage.  Instead of chasing his queen around, maybe Rac8 and c5 - c4 makes use of your extra material.  Extra material means nothing if you don't use it.

It may be, but when I have material or positional advantage or 'worse', both my interest in the game considerably increases my fear of losing. So in that position I needed to cancel any white initiative.

But this is psychological. Players like me appreciate symmetry, stability. Players like me like to be in control of the situation. An improved version of me is Karpov, Carlsen, Petrossian, Scheleter, etc. This is a psychological trait and independent of the player's strength.

"Okay, I'm won, so let's first make sure White does not try any kind of trick"

That's interesting. Players with my personality are more interested in restriction than activation. The epic clash between Karpov and Kasparov says a lot about it, on the one hand the player who is interested in activating his own pieces, on the other a player who is interested in not allowing the opponent to activate his pieces: restriction vs. activation.

ghost_of_pushwood

Stop playing 3-minute, for cryin' out loud! grin.png

Everybody hangs stuff at blitz.  I was the exchange and a pawn up in 3/2 and I ended up losing the game.  Whadya expect when there's no time left to think?

CalpiognaChess

A suggestion for your feelings: play longer games. For example you feel not happy loosing these games with 3'+2" blitz: try playing games with 5'+5" and everything will be more tranquil. Or if you play 5', try with 10'.

SkeweredFork

Opening Principles:

  1. Control the center squares – d4-e4-d5-e5
  2. Develop your minor pieces toward the center – piece activity is the key
  3. Castle
  4. Connect your rooks

Tactics...tactics...tactics...

The objective of development is about improving the value of your pieces by increasing the importance of their roles. Well-developed pieces have more fire-power than undeveloped pieces and they do more in helping you gain control.

Now we will look at 5 practical things you can do to help you achieve your development objective.

They are:

  1. Give priority to your least active pieces.
  • Which piece needs to be developed (which piece is the least active)
  • Where should it go (where can its role be maximized)
  1. Exchange your least active pieces for your opponent’s active pieces.
  2. Restrict the development of your opponent’s pieces.
  3. Neutralize your opponent’s best piece.
  4. Secure strong squares for your pieces.

 

Don’t help your opponent develop.

There are 2 common mistakes whereby you will simply be helping your opponent to develop:

  1. Making a weak threat that can easily be blocked
  2. Making an exchange that helps your opponent to develop a piece

 

Pre Move Checklist:

  1. Make sure all your pieces are safe.
  2. Look for forcing moves: Checks, captures, threats. You want to look at ALL forcing moves (even the bad ones) as this will force you look at, and see the entire board.
  3. If there are no forcing moves, you then want to remove any of your opponent’s pieces from your side of the board.
  4. If your opponent doesn’t have any of his pieces on your side of the board, then you want to improve the position of your least active piece.
  5. After each move by your opponent, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

 

Middlegame Planning:

  1. Expand your position:
  2. Gain more space.
  3. Improve the position of your pieces.
  4. Decide on what side of the board to play.
  5. Queenside: a-c files.
  6. Center: d-e files.
  7. Kingside: f-h files.

            Compare, space, material, and weakness(es)

            Play where you have the advantage.

  1. DO NOT HURRY. Regroup your pieces, and be patient.
ghost_of_pushwood

Hey, I think I smell Bacon... grin.png

ghost_of_pushwood

End of story!