Why were these moves considered mistakes/blunders?

Laskersnephew

In the language of computer analysis, the terms "mistake" and "blunder" generally mean that the evaluation of your move differs from the evaluation of the "best" move by a certain amount (more for a blunder, of course). So your moves were labeled as mistakes and blunders because there were better, or much better, moves available.

One simple example: 9...c6 was a blunder because you had 9...Bxc3, winning a piece by removing the guard on the Bb5

hikarunaku

If you cannot interpret why the engine says your move is a blunder or a mistake then the best way to understand it is by playing a few moves according to the variation which the engine suggests.

kthprog
Qoko wrote:

@kthprog As thumb rule, if you aren't sure why just check the analysis itself! It gives you the better move, and indeed, chess improvements consist of finding a stronger winning move or not losing so that accounts for both (ie 9.0-0? Bxc3 -+ and 15....Qxe5? +- (also thumb rule, the exposed queen on e5 in the French structures is rarely good)).

As for the opening, anti-positional moves are played; I've played the French for quite a while and the structure turns out non-French early on.

 

 

How is the French defense generally supposed to be played and why? Thanks happy.png

PawnstormPossie
kthprog wrote:
Qoko wrote:

@kthprog As thumb rule, if you aren't sure why just check the analysis itself! It gives you the better move, and indeed, chess improvements consist of finding a stronger winning move or not losing so that accounts for both (ie 9.0-0? Bxc3 -+ and 15....Qxe5? +- (also thumb rule, the exposed queen on e5 in the French structures is rarely good)).

As for the opening, anti-positional moves are played; I've played the French for quite a while and the structure turns out non-French early on.

 

 

How is the French defense generally supposed to be played and why? Thanks

I don't play the French Defence. Generally, it takes an entire book to cover a question like that.

Don't waste your time trying to figure out each and every "mistake" from a position reached by several "blunders". Start with the earliest couple of mistakes for each side. Find better moves/reasons and move on.

Maybe 4...Bb4 5.Bb5 and 5...Ne7 are good places to start.

TimothyScottPuente

9. 0-0 leaves the bishop hanging after 9...Bxc3

Isn't engine saying 8.Ne5 is dubious.

I only looked at that game a short time. It isn't even worth analyzing.

Ciao,

Timothy Scott Puente

kthprog
hikarunaku wrote:

If you cannot interpret why the engine says your move is a blunder or a mistake then the best way to understand it is by playing a few moves according to the variation which the engine suggests.

I think I need to learn the analysis tool a bit better. I was trying other moves but it took too long for it to calculate if the move was better or not.