An opponent 200 points below me was a drawmonger

SmyslovFan

I need to apologize to the readers of this thread for posting chess content. I see now that was inappropriate. I won't do that again in this thread.

HolographWars

So I guess I should go for the Yugoslav even though theory considers it much better for White.

And tell the TDs if my opponent keeps repeating a draw offer every move.

aa-ron1235
HolographWars wrote:

3 game mentalities:

1. Winboard

Trying to win at any cost

Example: Fischer

2. Optimist

Playing for the best result you think is justified

Example: Carlsen

3. Drawmonger

Example: No one becomes a grandmaster by drawmongering!

 

GIRI

mickynj

Giri plays sharp, exciting games. Even in that famous tournament  where he drew 14 games, there were almost short, tame draws.  I don't know why he has such a hard time converting, but it's not because he plays safe, solid lines

HolographWars

I agree. He plays for a win from the beginning. But he has a hard time converting, so many games end in draws. 

mickynj

And those elite GMs are hard to beat! You could hang Magnus Carlsen, burn him at the stakes, and bury his body at a crossroad with a wooden stake through his heart, and he will still probably find a drawing line

1e41-0

Personally I LOVE playing "drawmongers". You get quiet positions, but the drawmongers:

 

a) Are almost always much lower rated and will make mistakes.

b) Will trade all the wrong pieces in an attempt to bring the game closer to a draw.

c) Will NEVER find an opportunity to change the flow of the game when things are going badly for them.

d) Won't take advantage of your errors.

e) Will play extremely passively.

 

I'd much rather face this kind of player than some crazy tactician who sacs half his pieces -- even unsoundly -- where I have to sit and work at the board and a single mistake will cost me a point!

 

I often beat these drawmongers by spending 15-20 minutes on the clock for the entire game. They don't pose any problems to you; just play simple positional chess and you'll win 99% of the time.

 

 

DetectiveRams
1e41-0 wrote:

Personally I LOVE playing "drawmongers". You get quiet positions, but the drawmongers:

 

a) Are almost always much lower rated and will make mistakes.

b) Will trade all the wrong pieces in an attempt to bring the game closer to a draw.

c) Will NEVER find an opportunity to change the flow of the game when things are going badly for them.

d) Won't take advantage of your errors.

e) Will play extremely passively.

 

I'd much rather face this kind of player than some crazy tactician who sacs half his pieces -- even unsoundly -- where I have to sit and work at the board and a single mistake will cost me a point!

 

I often beat these drawmongers by spending 15-20 minutes on the clock for the entire game. They don't pose any problems to you; just play simple positional chess and you'll win 99% of the time.

 

 

Teach me your secrets....!

Nc3always

 

 

I played a match at the club last week against a well known drawer  me 2100 him 1900.  He played pretty well but not ambitiously, and to his credit he got his draw without too much fuss. was a bit peeved off at how easily he drew, but when arriving home and putting game on the analyser the computer thought he made only one innacuracy in a 40 move game (same for me) with no mistakes or blunders, so guess he deserved his draw.

          Was a time I used to lose against those type of players by trying too hard to win and stuffing it up, now I just shake  handd and say well played, deserved a draw,  and no need to feel upset becuase of drawing with 200 less rated player, it part of chess.

NelsonMoore

So if you have a choice to play aggressively (whereby you get a tactical complicated game where both sides would probably make mistakes missing the best moves) or passively (just play soundly), which do you choose against:

1. A player rated 200 points below you

2. A player rated equal to yourself

3. A player rated 200 points above you.

You may be the sort of player who always likes to play the same way regardless of your opponent.

Against a player 200 points below you, you may feel you need to win, so you go for something more aggressive. Or you may think by being aggressive you're more likely to give your opponent winning chances and if you play passive they are capable of blundering anyway, maybe not quite understanding the end-game as well as you.

Against your own standard I guess you play your preferred style.

Against a player 200 higher, you may wish to go with aggressive, so it's an open playing field and they could blunder just as much as you, whereas if you go passive they'l probably get the upper-hand towards the end-game. But then by going passive you're more likely to get a draw, or they may try to go aggressive to force a win against a weaker opponent and in doing so let you win.

All up to you, I guess.

 

darkunorthodox88

yeah, drawmongering with success is actually not that easy. Playing to avoid error is one thing, but playing actively to draw is another, and knowing your opponent wants to draw gives you an advantage. you can stir games into positions the drawmonger would rather be slightly worse but safe, instead of taking the bait and try to compete with you.

mickynj

There is a very simple formula for beating "drawmongers" rated 200 points less than you: Make better moves! Instead of whining about it, just outplay them. You are the better player, aren't you?