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Is this Move against Najdorf : Poisoned Pawn correct?

  • #21
    yureesystem έγραψε:
    StupidGM wrote:
    yureesystem wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    yureesystem έγραψε:

     1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 Najdorf 6.Bg6 e6 7.f4 Qb6 8.Qd3 Qxb2 9.Rb1 Qa3 10.f5! is the best move and black seem to do fine with 10...Qa5, white gets only slight advantage, 11.Bd2! Qc7 12.fxe6 fxe6 13.Be2 Nc6! { 13...Be7?}

    10...Qa5 is not terribly comfortable after 11.Qc4 Nbd7 12.fxe6! Qxg5 13.exf7+ Ke7 (forced) 14.Qe6+ Kd8 15.Qe8+ Nxe8 16.Ne6+ Ke7 17.fxe8=Q+ Kxe8 18.Nxg5, when Black may draw, but it's not that easy.

    Your 11.Bd2?! allows 11...e5, when white has problems organizing the attack.

    Naka's 10...Be7 is the sane way to play, and the most popular move by far.

     

     

    Eventually the black queen is going to Qa5, better sooner than later, there tactics because the loose queen position. 1.f5! Be7 11.fxe6 fxe6 12.Be2 Nc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14.Bh5+ { white able to check because the black queen loose position and get his piece back with strong attack too. ( 14...Nxh5 15. Bxe7 Kxe7?? 16.Nd5 wins black queen)} 14...g6 15.e5 dxe5 16.Rb3 Qa5 { black queen eventually goes to Qa5} 17..Bxg6+ hxg6 18.Qxg6+ Kd7 19.Bxf6 Rf8 20.Bxe7 Kxe7 and black is dead lost.

     

     

     

     

    14...Nxh5 15 Bxe7 Nf4 (0.0) according to Stockfish

     

     

     

    Kramnik found out never to trust your engine, he lost to GM Leko because he trust his engine analysis.

     

     Stockfish is wrong. 14.Bh5+ Nxh5 { instead of 14...g6} 15.Bxe7 Nf4 16. Qd4! { is the winning recipe to this position, because 16...Kxe7?? 17.Qxg7+ Ke8 18.Qxh8+ and black lost} 16...e5 17.Qxe5 dxe5 18.Bxa3 Nxg2+ 19.Kf2 Nf4 20.Na4 Be6 21.Nc5 Bxa2 22.Rb6 Kf7 23.Rb7+ Kf6 24 Ke3 Rad8 25.Rf1+ Kg5 and black is dead lost.

     

    That is why I always mention study your tactics other wise opening study is a waste of time.

     

    15...Nf4 is OK, and no more than slightly better for white. Plenty of games played, here is one fast resume:

     

     

  • #22
    MayCaesar wrote:
    Chase11eleven wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    Chase11eleven έγραψε:

    My advice: start playing the Kan. I played the najdorf for years and I've found that too often it is way too easy to go wrong with it. It feels like every single move is an only-move position where you have to find the right one and everything else is wrong. All of that hard work just to maintain equality? I think not.

    It's quite easy to go (very) wrong in the Kan as well.

     

    As far as I've found so far, not so much so as the najdorf.

     

    In Najdorf it is easy to miss some tactic costing you the game. In Caro, on the other hand, it is easy to play a bit too passive and end up squeezed and crippled. In a way, in Najdorf it is easy to make a tactical mistake, and in Caro it is easy to make a positional mistake.

    I don't mean the Caro-Kann. I mean the Kan Sicilian with e4 c5 Nf3 e6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4 a6

  • #23
    Chase11eleven wrote:
    MayCaesar wrote:
    Chase11eleven wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    Chase11eleven έγραψε:

    My advice: start playing the Kan. I played the najdorf for years and I've found that too often it is way too easy to go wrong with it. It feels like every single move is an only-move position where you have to find the right one and everything else is wrong. All of that hard work just to maintain equality? I think not.

    It's quite easy to go (very) wrong in the Kan as well.

     

    As far as I've found so far, not so much so as the najdorf.

     

    In Najdorf it is easy to miss some tactic costing you the game. In Caro, on the other hand, it is easy to play a bit too passive and end up squeezed and crippled. In a way, in Najdorf it is easy to make a tactical mistake, and in Caro it is easy to make a positional mistake.

    I don't mean the Caro-Kann. I mean the Kan Sicilian with e4 c5 Nf3 e6 d4 cxd4 Nxd4 a6

     

    Ah, okay, my bad!

  • #24
    StupidGM wrote:
    yureesystem wrote:
    StupidGM wrote:
    yureesystem wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    yureesystem έγραψε:

     1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 Najdorf 6.Bg6 e6 7.f4 Qb6 8.Qd3 Qxb2 9.Rb1 Qa3 10.f5! is the best move and black seem to do fine with 10...Qa5, white gets only slight advantage, 11.Bd2! Qc7 12.fxe6 fxe6 13.Be2 Nc6! { 13...Be7?}

    10...Qa5 is not terribly comfortable after 11.Qc4 Nbd7 12.fxe6! Qxg5 13.exf7+ Ke7 (forced) 14.Qe6+ Kd8 15.Qe8+ Nxe8 16.Ne6+ Ke7 17.fxe8=Q+ Kxe8 18.Nxg5, when Black may draw, but it's not that easy.

    Your 11.Bd2?! allows 11...e5, when white has problems organizing the attack.

    Naka's 10...Be7 is the sane way to play, and the most popular move by far.

     

     

    Eventually the black queen is going to Qa5, better sooner than later, there tactics because the loose queen position. 1.f5! Be7 11.fxe6 fxe6 12.Be2 Nc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14.Bh5+ { white able to check because the black queen loose position and get his piece back with strong attack too. ( 14...Nxh5 15. Bxe7 Kxe7?? 16.Nd5 wins black queen)} 14...g6 15.e5 dxe5 16.Rb3 Qa5 { black queen eventually goes to Qa5} 17..Bxg6+ hxg6 18.Qxg6+ Kd7 19.Bxf6 Rf8 20.Bxe7 Kxe7 and black is dead lost.

     

     

     

     

    14...Nxh5 15 Bxe7 Nf4 (0.0) according to Stockfish

     

     

     

    Kramnik found out never to trust your engine, he lost to GM Leko because he trust his engine analysis.

     

     Stockfish is wrong. 14.Bh5+ Nxh5 { instead of 14...g6} 15.Bxe7 Nf4 16. Qd4! { is the winning recipe to this position, because 16...Kxe7?? 17.Qxg7+ Ke8 18.Qxh8+ and black lost} 16...e5 17.Qxe5 dxe5 18.Bxa3 Nxg2+ 19.Kf2 Nf4 20.Na4 Be6 21.Nc5 Bxa2 22.Rb6 Kf7 23.Rb7+ Kf6 24 Ke3 Rad8 25.Rf1+ Kg5 and black is dead lost.

     

    That is why I always mention study your tactics other wise opening study is a waste of time.

    17...Qc1+ 18 Rxc1 dxe5 19 Bd6 Nxg2+ 20 Kf2 Nf4 21 Rb1 Ra7 (0.35)

     

    Yawn.

     

     

     

     

    Your yawning show the type of player you are. You don't realize the danger in these endgame with opposite color bishops and knights and rooks is extremely difficult for the defender to defend in these position, black will have a hard time to activate the king rook and compare to white freedom of his pieces and they work well together. Stockfish cannot teach you how to play the endgame, that is why opening study is a waste of time for amateur, its better to be proficient in tactics and endgame than opening.

  • #25
    pfren wrote:
    yureesystem έγραψε:
    StupidGM wrote:
    yureesystem wrote:
    pfren wrote:
    yureesystem έγραψε:

     1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 Najdorf 6.Bg6 e6 7.f4 Qb6 8.Qd3 Qxb2 9.Rb1 Qa3 10.f5! is the best move and black seem to do fine with 10...Qa5, white gets only slight advantage, 11.Bd2! Qc7 12.fxe6 fxe6 13.Be2 Nc6! { 13...Be7?}

    10...Qa5 is not terribly comfortable after 11.Qc4 Nbd7 12.fxe6! Qxg5 13.exf7+ Ke7 (forced) 14.Qe6+ Kd8 15.Qe8+ Nxe8 16.Ne6+ Ke7 17.fxe8=Q+ Kxe8 18.Nxg5, when Black may draw, but it's not that easy.

    Your 11.Bd2?! allows 11...e5, when white has problems organizing the attack.

    Naka's 10...Be7 is the sane way to play, and the most popular move by far.

     

     

    Eventually the black queen is going to Qa5, better sooner than later, there tactics because the loose queen position. 1.f5! Be7 11.fxe6 fxe6 12.Be2 Nc6 13. Nxc6 bxc6 14.Bh5+ { white able to check because the black queen loose position and get his piece back with strong attack too. ( 14...Nxh5 15. Bxe7 Kxe7?? 16.Nd5 wins black queen)} 14...g6 15.e5 dxe5 16.Rb3 Qa5 { black queen eventually goes to Qa5} 17..Bxg6+ hxg6 18.Qxg6+ Kd7 19.Bxf6 Rf8 20.Bxe7 Kxe7 and black is dead lost.

     

     

     

     

    14...Nxh5 15 Bxe7 Nf4 (0.0) according to Stockfish

     

     

     

    Kramnik found out never to trust your engine, he lost to GM Leko because he trust his engine analysis.

     

     Stockfish is wrong. 14.Bh5+ Nxh5 { instead of 14...g6} 15.Bxe7 Nf4 16. Qd4! { is the winning recipe to this position, because 16...Kxe7?? 17.Qxg7+ Ke8 18.Qxh8+ and black lost} 16...e5 17.Qxe5 dxe5 18.Bxa3 Nxg2+ 19.Kf2 Nf4 20.Na4 Be6 21.Nc5 Bxa2 22.Rb6 Kf7 23.Rb7+ Kf6 24 Ke3 Rad8 25.Rf1+ Kg5 and black is dead lost.

     

    That is why I always mention study your tactics other wise opening study is a waste of time.

     

    15...Nf4 is OK, and no more than slightly better for white. Plenty of games played, here is one fast resume:

     

     

     

     

    IM pfren, at your level opening are important but not at my level ( 2000-2199 uscf), I rather play some anti-Sicilian to avoid such heavy opening theory. The two final positions in the Najdorf: Poisoned Pawn 25 moves deep, you show are two difficult endgame with opposite color bishops and knights and rooks and black better have understanding how defend this type of position, otherwise its waste of time studying opening with heavy theory for amateurs. Amateur profit more studying tactics and endgame.

  • #26

    In very high level chess it come down who can play the endgame better, my recommendation is better to study players like Capablanca, Lasker,Rubinstein, Alekhine,Botvinnik, Fischer and Karpov, all those players I list are unique when it comes to the endgame and by playing and going over annotation of their games you become stronger players. 

     

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