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How old can you be, and still be able to improve in chess?

  • #61

    Two or three hundred pages of intermediate-level Tactics and Endgame books by well regarded authors (like Paul Littlewood and John Nunn) can move you into the 80th percentile of global chess players.  Just focus, and do it.

    And don't get bogged down by "Opening Systems Choreography," that's where most people stall out.  happy.png 

    As for the physical or age-related aspect of the game -- your chess strength is arguably strongest between 15 years old and 45 years old.  But who cares??

    You can always improve your chess knowledge, until you're 98 years old, as per @Ponz111's post above.  FYI --He's a former U.S. Correspondence Champion and great contributor to these forums.

    On balance, you can almost always teach yourself to play, better, faster and stronger, regardless of your rating.  A concise core of "chess knowledge" makes the game wonderfully enjoyable (at any age) and any rating.  Very Simple.

    Best Wishes.

  • #62

    Image result for old man

    I gained 150 rating points last year!

  • #63
    Morphysrevenges wrote:

     

    I gained 150 rating points last year!

     

  • #64

    I am sure I read recently that someone became a chessmaster at 72 years of age.  No mean feat!

  • #65

    i taught my grandmother to play chess and the moves

    she is 81

    she is old and wrinkly and she smells funny (sometimes)

  • #66

    But what do you guys aim as a goal? I am quite happy doing better than yesterday. And I am learning every day wink.png  But, to be frank, I do not understand all statements about tactical or dynamic or strategic play. I do not know what you are talking about. I do the best I can...

     

  • #67
    ossilov wrote:

    But what do you guys aim as a goal? I am quite happy doing better than yesterday. And I am learning every day   But, to be frank, I do not understand all statements about tactical or dynamic or strategic play. I do not know what you are talking about. I do the best I can...

     

     

     

     

     

    You are close to 1500 I think a reasonable goal is 1600 and maybe long term goal will be 1800. (1) Skills that a chess player should know and will help them achieve those goals, attacking skill is important because without it we can't punish those who break chess principles. Good book is " Attacking the King: Everyman Chess.(2) Tactics is extremely important it help an attack or win material, more material mean a easy win in the endgame. Good tactical book is  Chess Tactics for Champions by Susan Polgar. How to play the endgame is important without proper technique a mere pawn up is only a draw, when it actually is a win, there are position when being two pawns  down is a draw or even down a piece can be a draw, a good endgame book can explain it simply and interesting. My recommendation is Silman's Endgame, it is entertaining and fun book and highly instructive too; not overwhelming like some endgame books. 

     

    I will like to add, you are  so sweet and nice person it a pleasure to answer to your post and read your comments. A chess player like you will always have friends, you are super nice.

  • #68

    Short term memory  .........i watched a simo  by Tal  about  45 yrs ago at my club in liverpool , he played about 25  players  as white on all boards .He would go around  pretty fast (he  was in the centre of a rectangle of tables/boards) occasionally  he would stop as though stunned  and put his hand to his chin and look around  urgently .We all thought  that he had blundered on his last move (i was a spectator) , but what it was  is that he could nt remember  where he  had left his  fags !!

  • #69
    ossilov wrote:

    I have been striving to get better in chess. I think the breakthrough came when I no longer thought so hard about my rating. I play and I read - and my rating goes up and down. My goal is to learn and getting better. Whenever I lose, I go through an analyse of the game - and learn a lot. 

    According to the site's STATS, you're in approxmately the 90th percentile of Daily Players.

    https://www.chess.com/stats/daily/ossilov

     

    On balance, you've already "made it," and 90 percent of the Daily players are "weaker" than you.  So enjoy the limelight, and improve at your own pace.

    Teach those grandchildren how to play.  They will have fond memories of your chess time together.  grin.png

  • #70
  • #71
    ossilov wrote:

    But what do you guys aim as a goal? I am quite happy doing better than yesterday. And I am learning every day   But, to be frank, I do not understand all statements about tactical or dynamic or strategic play. I do not know what you are talking about. I do the best I can...

     

    While I'm much younger than you, I started playing as an adult, too. I don't expect to ever be a master. But I do try to improve, and measure my improvement by my OTB tournament rating (USCF). 

    When I was rated 1250, my goal was break 1400. When I was 1400, I wanted to break 1600. When I was 1600, I wanted to break 1800. I never quite got there. Then I took a few years off and came back rusty. Now, I just want to get back to my previous playing strength, and have a rating that proves it.

    But at my peak, I was in the 1700s USCF, and I would sometimes beat guys rated in the 1900s. I knew they were better than me, but I could also tell that I was close enough to that level that I was sure I could get there with just a little more improvement.

    And really, that's the way of it. As you said, you're happy to be better than yesterday. Improve as much as you can, and just set goals of getting a little better at a time.

    I often see posts here and on other chess sites about "What does it take to become a master/grandmaster?" The correct answer is "Who cares?" If you enjoy playing, learning, and improving, then you'll get as far as you can. If not, then you'll give up before you get there. The point is to enjoy the journey.

     

  • #72
    ossilov wrote:

    But what do you guys aim as a goal? 

     

    Great question. A simple answer is to have fun. What makes chess fun? I really enjoy the intellectual challenge of playing, learning and improving at chess, and it feels great when i manage to outplay my opponent. When i loose, i feel motivated to learn from my mistakes so that i can play sharper next time.

     

    My short term goal is to get a OTB rating. I will get one after playing a few more tournaments. After that my goal will probably be to play more OTB tournaments and steady increase my rating as long as playing chess bring something positive into my life.

  • #73
    ossilov wrote:

    I am a woman at 70. From childhood I have of course learned how to move the pieces. I started to play chess a few years ago, and did surprisingly well in a norwegian tournament on chess.com.  Then I took a pause, but started again not so long ago.  It goes up and down, and my question is this: Can I even think of improving in chess at my age?

     

    Personally, I think 70 might be too old for most people, but you may be an exception.  Anyway, even if you don't improve, there's some research results that suggest chess can help stave off Alzheimer's disease --so at least its got this benefit even if you don't improve.

  • #74

     

     

    Of course seventy is not too old to improve.

     

    Obviously the lower your rating the easier it will be to improve at any age.

     

    If you are rated around 1400 and not familiar with the fundamental rule taught in this short twelve minute video then watch it and see the structure and quality of your games improve.

     

    To take is a mistake by GM Igor Smirnov:

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-k2fRVYeFg

  • #75

    Thank you for this video!

  • #76

    That video is pretty advanced stuff. Of course u can improve, a lot. Real over the board tournaments are the best way and also they're clearly way more fun which is the important part.

  • #77

    I'm 67 and returned to chess in 2017 after many years away from the game.  There are things I learned in 2017 I didn't know before, mainly due to the tremendous increase in chess tactics training, overall info, etc. on the Internet, and think I'm a better player for it.

    Here is my Tactics Trainer rating at chesstempo for 2017 - you can see the upward trend from 1500 to over 1700:

    null

  • #78

    Yes, there is so much chess information availabe that almost any particular chess player can improve at any age when he is still rational.

  • #79

    Post #74 with a lesson from GM Igor Smirnov is great. "TO TAKE IS A MISTAKE"

    I have been trying to teach this concept for decades. However GM Smirnov explains this chess concept much better than i ever could.

    Any player Class B or stronger can learn a lot from this concept.

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