Was Alekhine assassinated?

gargraves
JamieDelarosa wrote:

I think there is strong evidence that his death photographs were staged, rather than "serene."  Who would do that and why?

I agree, the photo reeks of being staged, as JOGOREAL pointed out from a source, it was staged. If the photo was to be released to media, that would be one answer to why they might touch up a bit for a photo or photos. Also, people had been rummaging around by then. Today, they lock off suspicious scenes, however, even today they tend to NOT lock off or bother deeply looking into deaths of older people who are simply discovered dead, especially if there is no signs of struggle.

varelse1
JamieDelarosa wrote:

I think there is strong evidence that his death photographs were staged, rather than "serene."  Who would do that and why?

Possibly the murderers, to cover their tracks.

As to who the murderers may have been, theories vary from French Nazi hunters, to the KGB.

michaelcausey7
varelse1 wrote:
JamieDelarosa wrote:

I think there is strong evidence that his death photographs were staged, rather than "serene."  Who would do that and why?

Possibly the murderers, to cover their tracks.

As to who the murderers may have been, theories vary from French Nazi hunters, to the KGB.

IMO, the French were to busy cleaning up their own to send a team to Portugal for someone like Alekhine. The Soviets on the other hand were planning to take over the chess world and never forgot the Tzarists.

varelse1
michaelcausey7 wrote:
varelse1 wrote:
JamieDelarosa wrote:

I think there is strong evidence that his death photographs were staged, rather than "serene."  Who would do that and why?

Possibly the murderers, to cover their tracks.

As to who the murderers may have been, theories vary from French Nazi hunters, to the KGB.

IMO, the French were to busy cleaning up their own to send a team to Portugal for someone like Alekhine. The Soviets on the other hand were planning to take over the chess world and never forgot the Tzarists.

Right. But the French were also anxious to track down the Nazi's, before the trail grew cold, and they vanished forever.

They snagged quite a few Nazi's in this period.

michaelcausey7

They did, no doubt. But Alekhine wasn't french. He just lived there. There were many foreign people in France with or without Nazi sympathy. If a foreign nazi lover flees France, so what? If they went all over Europe chasing foreign nationals with nazi affiliations they'd be chasing them to this day. No, the Soviets had a much stronger motivation for finding Alekhine. He was publicly denouncing their socialist experiment everywhere he went. And a victory over Botvinnik (whether it was possible or not) couldn't be risked. A Tzarist, nazi sympothizing threat that had to be dealt with. France was probably just glad to be rid of him.

varelse1
michaelcausey7 wrote:

They did, no doubt. But Alekhine wasn't french. He just lived there. There were many foreign people in France with or without Nazi sympathy. If a foreign nazi lover flees France, so what? If they went all over Europe chasing foreign nationals with nazi affiliations they'd be chasing them to this day. No, the Soviets had a much stronger motivation for finding Alekhine. He was publicly denouncing their socialist experiment everywhere he went. And a victory over Botvinnik (whether it was possible or not) couldn't be risked. A Tzarist, nazi sympothizing threat that had to be dealt with. France was probably just glad to be rid of him.

They are chasing them to this day in fact.

But their capture ratio kinda fizzled out in the 50's.

An_asparagusic_acid
JamieDelarosa wrote:

From Wikipedia article on Alexander Alekhine:

After World War II, Alekhine was not invited to chess tournaments outside the Iberian Peninsula, because of his alleged Nazi affiliation. His original invitation to the London 1946 tournament was withdrawn when the other competitors protested.

While planning for a World Championship match against Botvinnik, Alekhine died aged 53 in his hotel room in Estoril, Portugal on March 24, 1946. The circumstances of his death are still a matter of debate. It is usually attributed to a heart attack, but a letter in Chess Life magazine from a witness to the autopsy stated that choking on meat was the actual cause of death. At autopsy, a three-inch-long piece of unchewed meat was discovered blocking his windpipe.

Some have speculated that he was murdered by a French "death squad". A few years later, Alekhine's son, Alexander Alekhine, Jr., said that "the hand of Moscow reached his father". Canadian Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, who has lived in Portugal since the late 1980s, and who has thoroughly investigated Alekhine's death, favors this possibility. Spraggett makes a case for the manipulation of the crime scene and the autopsy by the Portuguese secret police PIDE. He believes that Alekhine was murdered outside his hotel room, probably by the Soviets.

(Footnotes and hyperlinks in the original have been removed for greater ease of reading)

"Are you an Alekhine fan? Do you have an opinion either way about his death? I’d love to hear them--feel free to leave a comment!"

Sachan_1978

Did he really drink "litres" of brandy on a daily basis?? Wow, those old GM's lived a crazy life.

ArchbishopCheckmate

I heard he choked to death while dining alone.

varelse1
ArchbishopCheckmate wrote:

I heard he choked to death while dining alone.

That was the Official Version, yes.

What is being discussed here,  is whether or not there may have been a coverup?