What would you do...

  • #1

    ...if you were playing Magnus Carlsen, and he blundered and lost a piece. You are now a piece up for nothing. Magnus offers you a draw. Do you accept?

  • #2

    If I ever get the chance to play against MC in an official tournament, my class of play would be so high that a piece would mean a win against anyone. OTOH, playing for a win against MC, watching him desperatly searching for chances, even if I don't win is an expirience worth savouring. 

  • #3

    No. What's the point? Unless a draw would guarantee me 1st place in the London Classic and a cheque for a cool €50,000...

  • #4

    Play the board, not the opponent.

    Once you let Magnus get that far inside your head, you are already lost.

    Wink

  • #5

    Yeah, cause I would lose anyway even with him a piece or more down.

  • #6
    woodshover wrote:

    Yeah, cause I would lose anyway even with him a piece or more down.


     That's not the point woodshover. Assuming it's just some random game with no prize money etc. at stake you have nothing to lose and a lot to gain by playing on. Why would you accept a draw in a completely winning position? The prestige? People draw with great players in simuls all the time, can you name any of them?

  • #7
    Arctor wrote:
    woodshover wrote:

    Yeah, cause I would lose anyway even with him a piece or more down.


     That's not the point woodshover. Assuming it's just some random game with no prize money etc. at stake you have nothing to lose and a lot to gain by playing on. Why would you accept a draw in a completely winning position? The prestige? People draw with great players in simuls all the time, can you name any of them?


    I can - Steve Hayler - he once drew with Karpov in a simul (Karpov was giving the simul, not Steve)

  • #8

    In a heart beat.

  • #9

    One of my club teammates Charles Summers (rated about 2000) demolished Nigel Short in a simul last year.

    But agree, this isn't the point. Of course you shouldn't accept the draw. Your position is winning and not difficult to win even against perfect play. I was just interested to see what others thought.

    But here's a less clear-cut one. Magnus offers you a draw in a position where you are a pawn up, and although he doesn't have any 'compensation' in the classic sense, the position is quite complicated. Now what? I must admit that in this case I would at least consider accepting.

  • #10
    madhacker wrote:

    One of my club teammates Charles Summers (rated about 2000) demolished Nigel Short in a simul last year.

    But agree, this isn't the point. Of course you shouldn't accept the draw. Your position is winning and not difficult to win even against perfect play. I was just interested to see what others thought.

    But here's a less clear-cut one. Magnus offers you a draw in a position where you are a pawn up, and although he doesn't have any 'compensation' in the classic sense, the position is quite complicated. Now what? I must admit that in this case I would at least consider accepting.


    depends if its a tournament or not ? if so then another factor depends on if I have a chance at one of the top spots if I draw and if so yes and if its a caseul game HELL NO ! got nothin to lose anyway.

  • #11

    NM Reb once commented in a post that if a stronger player offers you a draw, you should become suspicious and look deeper into the position. Wink  I think there is a lot of truth to his statement...

  • #12

    Play for the win.

  • #13

    I would slowly conceive a repeating beeping sound, push the snooze button and try to keep dreaming

  • #14
    cookiemonster161140 wrote:

    This what-if question is a fantasy that many chess.com players have...and I can tell you even IF you were mysteriously paired with MC it's highly unlikely he'd blunder a piece for nothing, and even if he did - chances are you're still busted.

    The worlds top players are scary good - you have no idea how good unless you've played them.


     Good answer.

  • #15
    madhacker wrote:

    One of my club teammates Charles Summers (rated about 2000) demolished Nigel Short in a simul last year.

    But agree, this isn't the point. Of course you shouldn't accept the draw. Your position is winning and not difficult to win even against perfect play. I was just interested to see what others thought.

    But here's a less clear-cut one. Magnus offers you a draw in a position where you are a pawn up, and although he doesn't have any 'compensation' in the classic sense, the position is quite complicated. Now what? I must admit that in this case I would at least consider accepting.


    Play a very strong engine or elite human giving you piece odds and see how easy the win is. A rook is fairly easy, but a piece doesn't seem like enough.

  • #16

    It would really depend on the position. I would definitely want to beat him if he made a full-piece blunder. I would try really hard to win, instead of taking the draw. I've got nothing to loseSmile

  • #17
    trysts wrote:

    It would really depend on the position. I would definitely want to beat him if he made a full-piece blunder. I would try really hard to win, instead of taking the draw. I've got nothing to lose


     Except the game. :)

  • #18
    woodshover wrote:
    trysts wrote:

    It would really depend on the position. I would definitely want to beat him if he made a full-piece blunder. I would try really hard to win, instead of taking the draw. I've got nothing to lose


     Except the game. :)


     If you're afraid of losing a game then chess isn't for you

  • #19
    theunsjb wrote:

    NM Reb once commented in a post that if a stronger player offers you a draw, you should become suspicious and look deeper into the position.   I think there is a lot of truth to his statement...


     I think this is the answer that says it all.

  • #20
    Arctor wrote:
    woodshover wrote:
    trysts wrote:

    It would really depend on the position. I would definitely want to beat him if he made a full-piece blunder. I would try really hard to win, instead of taking the draw. I've got nothing to lose


     Except the game. :)


     If you're afraid of losing a game then chess isn't for you


     I just know a situation like that wouldn't happen to people at my level. Or yours either. Common sense. I don't consider myself a chess player anyway so you no longer have to worry about whether chess is for me or not.

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