White to Play and Win

batgirl

In 1939 Weaver Adams, who would be the U.S. Open Champion in 1948, wrote a book called "White to Play and Win."  Adams, the prototypical romantic gambiteer, felt the White, with its first-move advantage, should always win, everything being equal.

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                                                                Weaver Adams 1954

 

In 1962 "Chess Life" Larry Evans took Adam's analysis to task by tearing apart his beloved Adams Gambit (Adams died the following year):

 

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EhTrashyPanda

white to paly and win nice. just messing with you nice article though

batgirl

fixed. thanks.

kamalakanta

Very interesting!

 

here is a nice game which illustrates the counter-chances Black gets against 6.Nb5 by White:

 

 

kamalakanta

And here is another game, where Bronstein, playing Black, offers the rook on the Kingside!

 

 

phillidor5949

Thanks for the interesting post.
Weaver Adams' legacy lived on through Hans Berliner's 1999 book, The System. Berliner applied some of Adams' ideas, such as the Option Principle, but developed his 'system' based on 1.d4 vs. Adams' 1.e4.

Monie49
Thanks for the post, Batgirl!
batgirl

Thanks phillidor5946 and Mone49.

Thanks Kamalakanta for the Adams Gambit games.  

Evans' article, as he mentioned, was in response to analysis offered by Adams himself 2 months earlier. 

I can post that article but, since it's all in descriptive notation, I'm not sure many people, if any, will actually try to follow Adams' analysis.  

phillidor5949
batgirl wrote:

...I can post that article...

I vote please post.

batgirl

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phillidor5949

Thank you!

batgirl

In the last paragraph of Weaver's article above he referenced another article he contributed to "Chess Life" Sept. 1961, "White to Play and Win.".    Here is that article:

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batgirl

In the above article, Weaver referenced his previous article on the Sicilian in June 20, 1960 "Chess Life."
Here is that article:

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SleepTheNb4
batgirl wrote:

I can post that article but, since it's all in descriptive notation, I'm not sure many people, if any, will actually try to follow Adams' analysis.  

You're correct between the distinctive notation, and Larry Evans' article being a image it makes it hard to comprehend.  Fortunately, some old men have time on their hands and I thought I would share this.

Just as unfortunately, this old man doesn't have enough time to do the same with the three other articles you have posted on the Adam's Gambit. 

It seems to me that Mr. Evans was quite  upset to see this printed in Chess Life and, I believe, with good cause.  Wiki states that Fischer successfully used the Adams Gambit with the 6.h3 line.  I could not find such a game in my Fischer collection (1052 games).  There is one game with the 6.d4 line

but as can be seen Fischer wasn't too successful. As far as the hardiness of the Adam's even my complete amateur reply of 6...Nxd4 7.Ne4 Ne6 8.Qxe5 Nxe4 9.Qxe4 seems to yield black an equal chance and probably more.  Yet, as there are so many lines in chess that have been in favor and fallen out of favor it would have been good to see how Weaver would have done if he had not published his best lines and instead used them in competition before publishing them.  Who knows? 

batgirl
SleepTheNb4 wrote:
batgirl wrote:
 

  Fortunately, some old men have time on their hands and I thought I would share this.

 

Where would chess be if not for old men?

 

SleepTheNb4
batgirl wrote:

Where would chess be if not for old men?

 

Thank you.  Having done my part to dispel the myth that old men do nothing but chase young girls I can return to more rewarding pastimes.

batgirl
SleepTheNb4 wrote:
batgirl wrote:

Where would chess be if not for old men?

 

Thank you.  Having done my part to dispel the myth that old men do nothing but chase young girls I can return to more rewarding pastimes.

Chasing young girls?

HalfPawnOdds

@SleeptheNb4: Fischer tried 6. h3 several times against the Najdorf Sicilian (for instance against Bolbochan, Reshevsky, and Najdorf himself). Certainly not in the Vienna!