Presented at my chess club - Mate in 5

ScotchYa

@Rocky64 @Arisktotle 

I really have no idea about all of that stuff... all I was doing was replicating a problem on the board that was presented at my local chess club in which many highly rated players were around the table trying to solve - and couldn't.  It was intriguing and so I took a picture of the position so I could replicate it at home.  I have no idea how they came to that position, or if it was a problem from a book or where it originated... any of that.  I was only showing what was on a board at a club.    

Arisktotle

@Rocky64: That clears it up though we remain in a twilight zone. The threat after the key is a short and unthematic mate which makes the whole threat-department sort of irrelevant. Goes to show that composing is no more than 50% science!

Arisktotle
ScotchYa wrote:

@Rocky64 @Arisktotle 

I really have no idea about all of that stuff...    

Some people find an old painted canvas in the attic and take it to a car boot sale to catch a dime for it. Then somebody recognizes the van Gogh style and art experts start a fight on whether it is genuine. These people are not to blame. Neither are you.

ScotchYa
Arisktotle wrote:
ScotchYa wrote:

@Rocky64 @Arisktotle 

I really have no idea about all of that stuff...    

Some people find an old painted canvas in the attic and take it to a car boot sale to catch a dime for it. Then somebody recognizes the van Gogh style and art experts start a fight on whether it is genuine. These people are not to blame. Neither are you.

I mean yea, you couldn't have said it in a better analogy.  Happy to have turned over the van Gogh for those who can appreciate seeing what I can't. 

Rocky64
ScotchYa wrote:

@Rocky64 @Arisktotle 

I really have no idea about all of that stuff... all I was doing was replicating a problem on the board that was presented at my local chess club in which many highly rated players were around the table trying to solve - and couldn't...

Don't worry about my discussion with Arisktotle. As composers we are interested in the minute details of constructing a problem, like why a piece is necessary or whether it's superfluous. It's not uncommon for published problems to have constructional flaws, so we were just wondering if this fine problem you quoted could be a bit better.

As a regular solver you only need to worry about understanding the solution and the idea being shown. That's why back in post#5 I tried to explain the 5-move solution and mentioned things like White's threat after each move (it explains why each black move is forced). Most composed problems show a specific idea or theme and in this case it is (roughly speaking) the decoy of Black's rook to an unfavourable square, which I also mentioned.