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I get stuck in same rating(800). what should I do to improve myself?

  • #1

    Hello everyone,

    I am very very amateur chess player(28). I've learned chess in primary school but just basics. This summer, I really wanted to be a good chess player. Everyday I am trying to play at least 10 games. For example, with this account I played 570 games (280W / 12 D / 278L) I have more than one account on chess.com also I am playing on other chess sites. My current rating is around 800. I am solving puzzles everyday but I think it doesn't help me anymore. I've completed chess.com courses but still I cant improve myself. Am I dummy? No I don't think so. I am software engineer and writing complex algorithms is kinda mind exercise for me. Also I am watching a lot of chess streams and I think it is a good because I understand see how GM is thinking. Anyway, maybe it is a common problem you've faced before, so I think you can help me and give some suggestions. Thanks in advance.
    BTW, sorry for my bad english if I made mistakes. It is not my native.

  • #2

    1. Stop playing blitz, and bullet.  Play longer time controls of at least G30, or longer.  

    2. Follow Opening Principles:

    Control the center.

    Develop minor pieces toward the center.

    Castle.

    Connect your rooks.

    3. Study tactics...tactics...tactics.  One of my favorite quote is this: "Until you reach Master, your first name is tactics, your middle name is tactics, and your last name is tactics.

    4. Double Check your moves.  before making a move, ask yourself: "Are my pieces safe?"

    5. After your opponent moves, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"

    6. Analyze your games WITHOUT a chess engine, then have someone stronger go over the games, or post them here for review.

    7. DO NOT memorize openings.

    8. Learn basics mates:

    K vs. KQ

    K vs. KR

    K vs. KRR

    9. Learn basic King and Pawn endings.

    KP vs. K

    Opposition

    10. Have Fun!

  • #3

     

  • #4

    Your tactical patterns has a lot of work to do. Learn tactics in a fundamental way. Learn what is a pin,fork,skewer, removing the guard etc. I suggest Chess Tactics for Champion by Polgar. Always study your opponent's last move. Always look at the whole board. Before you make a move, check if there is a tactical drawback. Stop playing bullet chess. Watch the chess fundamental series by John Bartholomew starting with this.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ao9iOeK_jvU

     

  • #5

    @FishEyedFools, many thanks man. I know some basic mates and endgames. But you gave me very good tips, I will keep in my mind. Thanks for analysing my game. Actually, I was trying a different tactic but I couldn't make it because I was at the outside and didn't focus on my game happy.png But your comments helped me so much. Thanks again.

    @jambyvedar I am gonna watch it ASAP! And you are right, I don't know why I generally play 5 | 5 or 3 | 2. But from now on I am gonna play at least 15min. I believe that I am gonna learn a LOT of things from this vid. Thanks dude! 

  • #6

    FishEyedFools nailed it, especially his first piece of advice. Like any new skill, you need to learn to do it correctly before you can attempt to do it quickly. 

     

    If someone said to you, "I just started learning to drive last week, and I keep running into things at 120 kilometers per hour", your first thought would be that of course he can't control the car at that speed. Learn to drive slowly and get it right before trying to be a race car driver.

  • #7

    @Fromper you absolutely right man. And your example also happy.png But F yes, you are right. 

  • #8
    burakdemiroz wrote:

    @FishEyedFools, many thanks man. I know some basic mates and endgames. But you gave me very good tips, I will keep in my mind. Thanks for analysing my game. Actually, I was trying a different tactic but I couldn't make it because I was at the outside and didn't focus on my game  But your comments helped me so much. Thanks again.

    @jambyvedar I am gonna watch it ASAP! And you are right, I don't know why I generally play 5 | 5 or 3 | 2. But from now on I am gonna play at least 15min. I believe that I am gonna learn a LOT of things from this vid. Thanks dude! 

     

    His video will improve you. Watch all his video in the fundamental series.

  • #9

    I'd highly suggest playing some daily games. That way you have plenty of time to think about not only your next move, but how you opponent may respond as well. If you'd like I'd be willing to play a game or two with you at 2 or 3 days per move time control.

  • #10

    @Penfold77 it would be nice! But "Penfold77 only accepts challenges from members with a rating higher than 1094" FeelsBadMan.

  • #11

    Learn a couple of openings and get familiar with them. Learn what you are trying to do with the development of your pieces. Forget tactics until you become familiar with the basics. From my previous comments on tactics presented on this site you will know they make me vomit and have the effect of putting you off the game.

  • #12
    Barguest wrote:

    Learn a couple of openings and get familiar with them. Learn what you are trying to do with the development of your pieces. Forget tactics until you become familiar with the basics. From my previous comments on tactics presented on this site you will know they make me vomit and have the effect of putting you off the game.

    Worst advice ever.

     

    Chess is 99% tactics. Studying tactics is the most important thing players at ANY level can do to improve. It shouldn't be the only thing, but it definitely needs to be part of any improvement plan.

  • #13

    Studying openings won't do you much good if you hang your queen as soon as you get out of book.  That's why tactics is the most important thing at your level.

    At your level, people lose because they give away free pieces and don't take the free pieces that their opponents give them.  If you stop hanging as many pieces and start taking more of the pieces your opponent gives you, you will start to rapidly improve.  Doing tactical puzzles like that Tactics Trainer will help you a lot.

     

    Once you get into the 1200-1500 range, you can start to pay a bit of attention to openings - but just a bit.  You're not a GM.  You don't need to know lines 20 moves deep.  You don't need to get that +0.3 evaluation out of the opening.  All you need is to reach a playable middlegame; to get that, you just need to know enough to avoid any traps in the openings you play regularly.  So serious study of openings isn't likely to help you all that much until you're comfortably over 1500.

     

    Here's something you could do.  Play daily games (or other slow games), and for every move, go through the following checklist:

    1. Is he threatening any of my pieces?  If so, do I need to move or protect it, or should I counter-attack elsewhere?

    2. Am I threatening any of his pieces?  If so, does he have any threats I need to respond to before I take it?  Do I have any other opportunities that might be even more important?

    3. Can he put me in check?  How will I react if he does?  Will it improve his position or make mine worse?

    4. Can I put him in check?  How will he react if I do?  Will it improve my position or make his worse?

    5. Can he threaten any of my pieces?  How will I react if he does?  Will it improve his position or make mine worse?

    6. Can I threaten any of his pieces?  How will he react if I do?  Will it improve my position or make his worse?

     

    Just because you say "yes" to some things on that checklist doesn't mean you necessarily have to react to it now.  It's OK to let your opponent threaten your queen if it just forces you to move your queen to a better square.  But you need to be aware of it so that you know what potential opportunities you might have, and what potential threats you might have to react to.

  • #14

    Also, go through and analyse your games after they're finished.  Especially analyse your losses to see where you went wrong.

     

    Analyse them without an engine first; then go back with an engine to see if you missed any tactics.  Don't worry too much about any inaccuracies the engine points out; many engine moves will have ideas that are far too deep for you at this point, and even GMs sometimes struggle to understand engine moves.  But it's good for identifying blunders.

  • #15
    burakdemiroz wrote:

    @Penfold77 it would be nice! But "Penfold77 only accepts challenges from members with a rating higher than 1094" FeelsBadMan.

     

    Apologies for that. Wasn't aware I had any kind of rating limit set. Try it now.

  • #16

    @FishEyedFools has given the perfect answer. 

    1. Openings:

    No need to learn openings until you reach 1500. Just follow the 4 points that @FishEyedFools mentioned.

    2. Tactics: Practice lot of tactics. Do not make the move until see the complete solution. 

    3. End Games Studies: Get a Endgame Book and study as much as possible. With fewer pieces in the board Endgames are the best to practice deep visualization. 

  • #17

    Tactical improvement is a  must for a beginner and reducing dropping pieces is a must. But how long you should study tactics? I have seen advices that a few puzzles per day is enough. 30 minutes tactical study is enough. It is more with quality than quantity.  So what will you will do if you still have time for chess study? Watch videos and study endgames. A book like Logical Chess Move by Move or Complete Idiot's Guide to Chess will also help you improve.

     

    Simple Tips to help reduce blunders.

     

    1. Always study your opponent's last move

    2. Always look at the whole board

    3. Before you make a move, check if there is a tacticsl drawback

    4. If you need to, calculate moves.

    5. Don't lose focus.

  • #18

    I think that taking your time to think things through is key... play some daily games, taking your time to think through all relevant possibilities.  Study other people's games.  Make sure you understand all the basics of strategy... pins, double attacks, controlling center, positional strategies, etc.  If you don't slow down to actually understand they dynamics, it's hard to improve.

    Watch some Youtube strategy videos... tons of great content there!  You don't improve much just by playing... especially if you're playing fast.  Beginners playing fast don't typically play well anyway.

    Think through your opponents strategy... always ask yourself why your opponent made the last few moves... what are they trying to do?  What is your strategy?  If you only think about your side of the board until you're attacked... you're history.  Finally, don't forget about the psychological components of the game...

    Good luck.

  • #19

     Others are giving you useful ideas(follow them) but there are some bad instructions which I want to correct:

    1) play lots of blitz. Avoid long games.

    2) learn a simple e4 e5 opening for white and black.

    3) look out for opening traps like scholars mate, shilling mate, fool's mate, ...etc.

  • #20

    Just saying have more then one account on chess.com isn't allowed for non titled players

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