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Sergey Karyakin's 3 questions before he moves.

Stig. a friend of mine and student from Sweden asked me:  

"Attila, what is your 3 main questions you ask yourself before you do a move , maybe you could also ask the great player S. Karjakin, if you do the same or not?"

I replied him this:
"I ask these questions before I make a move:
1.What does my opponent want with his last move?
2.Is there a possibility to win with a combination?
3.What moves helps me to go closer to my long term goals?
4.If I play the move which I want to move, then what possibilities I may give to my opponent?
5.Am I ready to deal with his reaction?
I sent your question to Sergey Karyakin and wait for his answer."
I just got a message from Sergey Karyakin, who is the 7th best player of the World and the record holder of the world youngest grandmaster.
Attila Turzo   Attila Turzo @AttilaTurzo 06 Nov
 
@SergeyKaryakin A student wrote to me: ask the great player S. Karjakin:What is your 3 main questions you ask yourself before you do a move?
 

 
Sergey Karyakin  
 
@AttilaTurzo 1. I want to play this. 2. This is bad. 3. Who cares? 


Comments


  • 12 months ago

    Curmudgeon1939

    I will begin to use:

    Chess Plan of Action (PIEGSTM)

    Before first move and after each move by your opponent:

    Evaluate Opponents Move

    1. Perception (Action Level) – Observe your opponents move, record your opponents move, and DOUBLE-CHECK your opponents recorded move.

    2. Interpretation (How Level) – How did your opponent respond to your move or opening?  

    3. Evaluation (What Level) What improvements or weaknesses has your opponent created?

    Move

    4. Goal (Why Level) Is your goal still achievable or does it need to be changed guided by your evaluation of the overall position?

    5. Strategy (What Level) What is the best course of action to counter your opponents move and improve your position guided by your goal?

    6. Tactics (How Level) – How can you make the best move guided by your strategy?

     7. Move (Action Level)– Make your best move, stop your clock, record your move, and DOUBLE-CHECK your recorded move. 

    Thoughts?

  • 18 months ago

    wingfour

    Did you see Sergej's videos during the recent Tata tourney? I just love this man.

  • 20 months ago

    nirvana

     What matters most is answering right to the questions.

  • 20 months ago

    himath2009

    Apropos, Karyakin 's response is smug...

  • 20 months ago

    himath2009

    There is only one question to be asked:

    - What is the best move?

    And, a prayer that your answer is correct...

  • 20 months ago

    mottsauce

    Yes, I would, but that's not the point.

  • 20 months ago

    Twobit

    @mottsauce: I am just curious; would not you be interested what Magnus would say? 

  • 20 months ago

    mottsauce

    Twobit, you're being a jerk. Please get a sense of humor, or go away.

  • 20 months ago

    Twobit

    Sergey does not actually answer the question. Out of "What is your 3 main questions..." he has only "Who cares?". Truly brilliant and effortless indeed. Now, I would wager that Magnus Carlsen would be more helpful, adding a little effort to answer this. Could you ask him, please?

    (On a different note, most chess writers studying thinking processes of grandmasters found no evidence of such a "checklist". While they actually do care, their approach is not that of "think like a tree" a la Kotov)

  • 20 months ago

    Lawdoginator

    lol

  • 20 months ago

    RetGuvvie98

    excellent tips for winning chess planning.

    thanks IM.

  • 20 months ago

    FM chesskingdreamer

    Laughing

  • 20 months ago

    Rasparovov

    Funny that's actually how I think sometimes.. With less success than Karyakin.

  • 20 months ago

    MrMars

    hahahahahha

  • 20 months ago

    sajay

    if he think otherwise- he could be World #6!!

  • 20 months ago

    p2kpradeep

    LOL... So that's the attitude you need to be the 7th best player in the world! 

  • 20 months ago

    Gaffneychess

    Questions are good but I'd rather look for a move that forces my opponents response.  If I do this and his response is beneficial to me then what questions are there to ask?  I know chess is more complicated than that but wouldn't it be nice if it was that easy? I'm with Sergey on this one.  Who cares?  LOL

  • 20 months ago

    chessmaster102

    lol

  • 20 months ago

    gnuandspeedo

    Asking such questions on a consistent basis may help reduce game spoiling blunders. Going turn base and not live also reduces blunders big time for meSmile

  • 20 months ago

    Stanley3349223

    Sergey Karyakin is a genuis. A man of few words. 

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