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Morphy Honored

                                                                                                        
                                                                                                            
                                                                                                          
from Chess Life   Aug. 20, 1954.
                                                       


CHESS PLAYERS HONOR MORPHY
     President Frank Graves of the U.S. Chess Federation performed on of his first acts of the Sunday afternoon, Aug. 8th, by laying a wreath of flowers on the tomb of Paul Morphy, New Orleanian, of international chess fame.  Graves, of Fort Worth, Texas,  delivered a eulogy of Paul Morphy in which he declared "by the magic of his genius he emblazoned the name of Paul Morphy in such brilliant colors that the passing of an entire century has not dimmed the lustre of his name.
     Some 30 persons from the U.S. Chess Federation Open Championship tournament now underway at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans under the auspices of the U.S. Chess Federation and the two other sponsoring groups. Davis A. Walsdorf, president, represented the New Orleans Chess Club and A. L. McAuley, secretary-treasurer, represented the Louisiana Chess Association.
     Nicolas Rossolimo,  the former French chess champion ; former President and Mrs. Harold M. Phillips of the U.S. Chss Federation ; Miss Mona May Karff, New York City, woman international master ; and other players from the Open Tournament witnessed the ceremony in St. Louis No. 1 on Basin Street, the oldest cemetery in New Orleans.

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    Jacob30

    Pleased to meet you.

  • 4 years ago

    Jacob30

    Who is csaba? Who is batgirl? I have heard of catwoman and not a batgirl.

  • 4 years ago

    batgirl

    MIDYMAT, I'll see you get a full refund.

  • 4 years ago

    batgirl

    Thanks Csaba.  I dug a little deeper and verified some of what you wrote. 

    Raymond Roussell and the Republic of Dreams by Mark Ford 2001
    " 'In 1932 I took up chess. . .At the end of three and a half months I discovered the following means of achieving the extremely difficult checkmate with bishop and knight.'   During this period Roussel took lessons from a teacher called Romih at the Café de la Régence at the Palais-Royal; there he met chess master Tartakower, who wrote up Roussel's formula in the November issue of L'Echiquier, and in the following month's issue published his further reflections on Roussel's discovery.  Roussel was obviously keen that Tartakower establish connections between his technique as a chess-player and his technique as a writer, for a footnote makes lines between the concision of his formula and that of his literary style.  In yet another article, which appeared in the January/February 1933 number of Les Cahiers de l'Echiquier francais (edited at the time by Francois le Lionnais, who would co-found the Oulipo movement in 1960), Tartakower places Roussel in the context of a tradition of writers interested in chess, including Alexandre Dumas, Diderot, Rousseau, Voltaire and Poe.
                  The chess world should celebrate the fine acquisition of the
                   great Surrealist writer, Raymond Roussel, who, with his
                   discovery of a simple formula for achieving the extremely
                   complicated checkmate with bishop and knight, reveals
                   himself also a great thinker in chess.
    It was while pondering a move at the Café de la Régence that he was observed, bit not approached, by his admirer Marcel Duchamp, who would likewise abandon art for chess, or at least claim to do so. 'He seemed very "strait-laced," a high colar, dressed in black, very very Avenue du Bois,' Duchamp later recalled in an interview."

    But, from All About Coffee  by William Harrison Ukers 1922
    "Chess is today still in favor at the
    Régence, although the players are not, as were the earlier patrons, obliged to pay by the hour for their tables with extra charges for candles placed by the chess-boards. The present Café de la Régence is in the rue St.-Honorté, but retains in large measure its aspect of olden days."

    So, the hosting of chess might have ended in 1916, but chess apparently was still played.

  • 4 years ago

    MIDYMAT

    What is this? It isn't a article or really anything but a reprint of something from 1954.

    If you want to honor Morphy (A great chess player) write a proper article not cut and paste.

  • 4 years ago

    Jacob30

    Hi all. Nice to meet you.

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    batgirl

  • 4 years ago

    Jacob30

    Who is Sarah?

  • 4 years ago

    Jacob30

    Booo

  • 4 years ago

    ChessAuthor

    There's a mystery novel called "Even Dead Men Play Chess" with a main character who is a chess teacher and his dog's name is Morphy.

  • 4 years ago

    batgirl

    I put the cropped Matthew Brady photo on findagrave several years ago. The Morphys lived in Charleston, SC for a while.  Then, after Don Diego Morphy became the consulate for the port of New Orleans in 1809, he moved his family there. His son, Alonzo (Paul's father) was about 11 at the time.

     

    Csaba, was the Café de la Régence still a place for chess play in Rossolimo's time? I thought the chess rooms there  were shut down in 1916.

  • 4 years ago

    lknoepp

    They used to have a Paul Morphy Chess Club in New Orleans on Baronne Street.  I went there in 1955 to play a game of chess and it had turned into a gentleman's dining club.  Nobody played chess there any more.  Also my wife is a Walsdorf.  Nice picture of Morphy on findagrave.com.

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    The Everything Chess Basics Book by the USCF prominently features Morphy's Opera House Game.

     

    That is an honor too. 

  • 4 years ago

    dashkee94

    I guess that's the only honor he's going to get from the USCF; a wreath 57 years ago.  What a shame.

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