Wasn't That a Time?

Wasn't That a Time?

batgirl
|
Apr 26, 2018

     Although I Dig Rock and Roll Music, I'm really more of a folkie, fond of not only the folk-rock of Bob Dylan, the Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel, etc., but of traditional American folk music and of those that popularized it all...

Da-da-da-dancing

Da-da-da-dancing

batgirl
|
Apr 18, 2018

    For many years I used this blog for expounding upon my many explorations into the culture and history of chess. For just as many years I abandonned this blog in favor of publishing those explorations in the more popular article s...

Final Blog

Final Blog

batgirl
|
Oct 13, 2013

      This is my last blog on chess.com.  I may continue to contribute an occasional article on chess history, but that's all.       My archive should be accessible if anyone cares to wade through it all.      Thanks to everyone who has given...

Chess with the Nazis

Chess with the Nazis

batgirl
|
Sep 29, 2013

     During the 1939 Chess Olympiad (August 24th  - September 19th)  in Buenos Aires, Germany invaded Poland and WWII began in Europe.  The USA didn't participate in the 8th Olympiad for financial reasons. Great Britain dropped out upon news of G...

Max Lange on Morphy/Anderssen

Max Lange on Morphy/Anderssen

batgirl
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Sep 23, 2013

Adolphus Anderssen by Max Lange, 1858 The Match with Herr Anderssen. I.     The high reputation which the Transatlantic master had enjoyed for a long time in the western part of Europe had insensibly found an echo in Germany. There were, it is ...

H.J.R. Murray

H.J.R. Murray

batgirl
|
Sep 18, 2013

      Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching f...

Medieval Chess Stories by Murray

Medieval Chess Stories by Murray

batgirl
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Sep 15, 2013

     Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching for...

Parsloe's Coffee-House by Murray

Parsloe's Coffee-House by Murray

batgirl
|
Sep 10, 2013

       Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching ...

The Courier Game by Murray

The Courier Game by Murray

batgirl
|
Sep 5, 2013

     Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching for...

Howard Staunton

Howard Staunton

batgirl
|
Sep 1, 2013

     Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching fo...

William Lewis

William Lewis

batgirl
|
Aug 28, 2013

      Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching f...

The Ups and Downs of John Henry Huttmann

The Ups and Downs of John Henry Huttmann

batgirl
|
Aug 23, 2013

     Looking into rise of popularity of chess in England during the early 19th century, it's necessary to look not only at the individual players and writers of chess, but at the various clubs and venues. While not the first, one of the most impo...

Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais

Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais

batgirl
|
Aug 18, 2013

  La Bourdonnais' death-mask Instead of a portrait, we only have a sad caricature drawn from a dreadful mask moulded after death.  -Gabriel-Éloy Doazan writing to Prof. Geo. Allen        Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais followed Deschapell...

George Walker

George Walker

batgirl
|
Aug 14, 2013

      Harold James Ruthven Murray was possibly the greatest and most influential chess historian ever born.  His monumental work, "A History of Chess," published in 1913, is still valid and quite useful in its centennial year. While researching f...

Deschapelles

Deschapelles

batgirl
|
Aug 9, 2013

Alexandre Louis Honoré Lebreton Deschapelles(portrait - HERE)      After the death of Philidor in 1795 there was a period of silence in the chess world. In 1775 four men had gotten together and wrote a book called "Traité Théorique et Pratique...

The Professor of Chess

The Professor of Chess

batgirl
|
Aug 5, 2013

Jacob Henry Sarratt (1772-1819)      Jacob Henry Sarratt, born in 1772, worked primarily as schoolmaster but was much better known for his advocations which, of course, included chess.     After Philidor's death, Verdoni (along with Leger, Carli...

Early Modern Chess Writers and Poets

Early Modern Chess Writers and Poets

batgirl
|
Aug 1, 2013

     Poetry in chess has been around for a long time.  H.J.R. Murray's "A History of Chess" dedicated an entire chapter to Early Didactic Literature.  It this chapter he discusses 11 Latin poems and 2 Hebrew poems ...

Philidor

Philidor

batgirl
|
Jul 30, 2013

                                                                                   François André Danican Philidor There are several very good biographies of Philidor on the web:Bill Wall's Master Profile - PhilidorWikipedia - PhilidorMy own:  ...

Chess: 1475-1795

Chess: 1475-1795

batgirl
|
Jul 26, 2013

     When studying history, at some point you have to stop looking at the trees and take in the entire forest. The 19th century is so important and complex that the death of Philidor is the appropriate place to mark as a vantage point for looking...

Gioacchino Greco

Gioacchino Greco

batgirl
|
Jul 21, 2013

Gioacchino Greco  (1600-1634)      Gioachino Greco, also known as "Il Calabrese", was born around 1600 in Celico, which near Cosenza in Calabria. Calabria had already produced such players as Leonardo di Bono and Michael di Mauro. From his writi...

The Nature of a Chess Historian

The Nature of a Chess Historian

batgirl
|
Jul 17, 2013

Long ago I had come across an article by Bob Meadley, recipient of the 2002 Purdy Medal, An Australian chess award for outstanding contribution as a player or journalist. In this article (which Meadley expressly states is not copyrighted), the aut...

Ladies' Entry into the Chess World.

Ladies' Entry into the Chess World.

batgirl
|
Jul 14, 2013

     A couple of years ago I published a 3 part series on the famous Ladies Chess Club of London.   Although those posting were pretty much raw data set in a chronological order with some photos and games to lighten things up, I felt it gave a go...

Dizikes Does Morphy

Dizikes Does Morphy

batgirl
|
Jul 10, 2013

       I had written this 7 years ago. It's a rather tedious examination of Paul Morphy under the auspices of John Dizikes.  It's probably not meant for everyone, but might be of interest to anyone with a deep interest in Morphy. ______________...

When Morphy Was a Boy

When Morphy Was a Boy

batgirl
|
Jul 7, 2013

from the "American Chess Bulletin,"  September, 1911. p. 201   When Morphy Was a Boy. A communication addressed to the Staten Islander by Silas F. Catchings, a member of the Staten Island Chess Club, has a special interest at this time. Mr. Cat...

Charles de Maurian's Obituary of Paul Morphy

Charles de Maurian's Obituary of Paul Morphy

batgirl
|
Jul 3, 2013

      As most folks interested in Paul Morphy know, Charles Amédée de Maurian had been his best friend since childhood.  Paul's father and Charles' father (also Charles) were both lawyers, judges and politicos in New Orleans and lived near and as...

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