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Please analyse my game


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    chessmasterhj

    Hi,

    Here as usual I bring another. Constantly I am being beaten in Live Chess 30 mins. So I need analysis to learn from my mistakes. Thank you



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    blueemu

    You spent a lot of time Pawn-hunting with your Queen on the Q-side, allowing your opponent to build up a big advantage in development. I'm also not sure why you developed your QN at d7 on move 6, when the c6 square was also available.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    JG27Pyth

    Hard to understand 20...f6 ... seems like that was a self inflicted wound there was no recovering from. I think the plan at move 20 was to take the c-file and pressure his weak d4 pawn. Obviously he resists that but the point is to get some counterplay to keep him from setting up a kingside attack. In other words you can't stop his kingside attack, you can only distract him from it with your own threats. Instead, f6 basically says, here, let's speed your whole plan along. I reallize the idea was to get some squares for the bishop which is indeed a horrible piece for the moment... but f6 is way too weakening and radical a way to do it. Bd8; Bd6 would improve it substantially imo. And White's pawns stuck on dark squares is good for the bishop in the endgame if you could have exchanged away some of the heavy pieces. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    tastendruecker

    16. ... Nb3 ? and 17. ... Nxd4 ? are bad moves. You spend 2 moves to trade your valuable knight for an useless bishop blocked by the own pawns and even strengthen the white pawn on e5 as a side effect.

    16. ... Ne4 ! is the best answer to 16. f4 ?! which weakens the e4 square.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    transpo

    chessmasterhj wrote:

    Hi,

    Here as usual I bring another. Constantly I am being beaten in Live Chess 30 mins. So I need analysis to learn from my mistakes. Thank you

     



    Please notice something very important after 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Nf3.  You, as Black, have an advantage of 2 vs.1 pawn in the center.  Your 2 Black pawns at d5 and e7 vs. White's pawn at d4 is a static advantage that will endure into the endgame.

    There is alot more that I will post a little later.

    If you know something about the Caro-Kann opening, it was an excellent choice by you considering that you were playing someone rated 200 points higher than you.  As you progress in chess you will learn that the Caro-Kann is an excellent drawing weapon.

    Before I begin to analyze your game it is necessary to make you aware of something very important.  In order to improve your game you will have to change the way you think and analyze your games and positions now.  It will prove difficult to learn how to think in this counterintuitive way.  But, if you persist, in time your game will improve dramatically.

    I will post more a little later.

    The other posts on your topic give you partial answers.  They are accurate answers but they do not explain why. In order to give you the big picture of what is going on in this game.  In other words, the right perspective that will cause the right move(s) to drop out of the matrix of possible moves in any position like ripe fruit.  Later on I will spell out the reasons why for every post in your topic.

    To gradually change the way you think about chess game play and analysis it will be necessary for you to learn 3 concepts:

    1. Siege Warfare -  Chess is siege warfare in the form of a board game.  All forms of siege warfare apply 3 strategies (restrain, blockade, execute -- the enemy)

    2. Two (2) Opening Theories:

      a.Classical Chess Opening Theory - Control the center (d4,e4,d5,e5) by occupying it with your pawns and pieces

      b.Hypermodern Chess Opening Theory - Control the center by using the power of your pawns and pieces.  With this method you do not create targets in the center for your opponent to attack

    3. Pawn Structure - is the terrain of the battlefield (the hills, mountains, and valleys) All plan(s) of attack must conform to the pawns structure or they are doomed to failure.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    ClarkDMerrifield

    22. ..... Rf7 leaves your kingside weakened in preparation for your bishop file attack.  My analysis shows 22. ... Rc1 to be much stronger. Now if 23. Qh5 mate threat, the play (23. Qh5 Qd3  24. Rd1 Qc2  25. Qg4 Rc6) leaves black with a favorable position.  

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    transpo

    • chessmasterhj wrote:

      Hi,

      Here as usual I bring another. Constantly I am being beaten in Live Chess 30 mins. So I need analysis to learn from my mistakes. Thank you



      Please notice something very important after 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 4.Nf3.  You, as Black, have an advantage of 2 vs.1 pawn in the center.  Your 2 Black pawns at d5 and e7 vs. White's pawn at d4 is a static advantage that will endure into the endgame.

      There is alot more that I will post a little later.

      If you know something about the Caro-Kann opening, it was an excellent choice by you considering that you were playing someone rated 200 points higher than you.  As you progress in chess you will learn that the Caro-Kann is an excellent drawing weapon.

      Before I begin to analyze your game it is necessary to make you aware of something very important.  In order to improve your game you will have to change the way you think and analyze your games and positions now.  It will prove difficult to learn how to think in this counterintuitive way.  But, if you persist, in time your game will improve dramatically.

      I will post more a little later.

      The other posts on your topic give you partial answers.  They are accurate answers but they do not explain why. In order to give you the big picture of what is going on in this game.  In other words, the right perspective that will cause the right move(s) to drop out of the matrix of possible moves in any position like ripe fruit.  Later on I will spell out the reasons why for every post in your topic.

      To gradually change the way you think about chess game play and analysis it will be necessary for you to learn 3 concepts:

      1. Siege Warfare -  Chess is siege warfare in the form of a board game.  All forms of siege warfare apply 3 strategies (restrain, blockade, execute -- the enemy)

      2. Two (2) Opening Theories:

        a.Classical Chess Opening Theory - Control the center (d4,e4,d5,e5) by occupying it with your pawns and pieces

        b.Hypermodern Chess Opening Theory - Control the center by using the power of your pawns and pieces.  With this method you do not create targets in the center for your opponent to attack

      3. Pawn Structure - is the terrain of the battlefield (the hills, mountains, and valleys) All plan(s) of attack must conform to the pawns structure or they are doomed to failure.



       With my next post I will combine the application of the 3 concepts above with the opening theory for the Caro-Kann. 

       After 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 cxd5 you have transposed to the Exchange Variation of the Caro-Kann. The main factors to take note of after 4.Nf3?! are:
     
    1. 2 vs. 1 pawn advantage in the center for Black
    2. The characteristic pawn structure that is taking shape
    3. The Classical Chess Opening Theory that is being applied by both White and Black
    4. With 4. Nf3?! White failed to apply the best restraining method of siege warfare against Black's position.  The best and only way to keep the advantage is with 4.Bd3!
     
    I will explain in detail all of the factors above with my next post.
     

     


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  • 24 months ago · Quote · #8

    chessmasterhj

    Thank you all for your analysis. It was really helpful. I was playing like a blind. I need to adopt good thought process.

    @ Transpo: I will wait to see what it holds for me?

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #9

    konhidras

    Chessmasterhj i also play the caro-kann sometimes i win sometimes i lose. Ill be very willing to play with you. Rated or unrated and exchange analysis with you even during the game or after.  If i may add. From my experience with it "Its very dangerous to move the f-pawn to f6. Just send me a notye if interested. Gluck

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #10

    transpo

    chessmasterhj wrote:

    Thank you all for your analysis. It was really helpful. I was playing like a blind. I need to adopt good thought process.

    @ Transpo: I will wait to see what it holds for me?

    In the interim it will be very helpful to you to purchase 2 books on Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble.com:

    1. "My System", by Aaron Nimzowitsch ($15) -  it is the handbook on applying siege warfare on the chess board.  When reading this book it is very important to keep in mind that the perspective of the author is Hypermodern Opening Theory.  Almost every strong chessplayer has read and studied this book.

    2."Pawn Power In Chess", by Hans Kmoch ($10)- it is the doctoral thesis on pawn play.  A comprehensive work on the elements to advanced pawn play from the perspective of siege warfare, chess opening theory and pawn structure.  Begin reading the book on page 107.  On that page he writes that almost every opening results in one of 6 characteristic pawn structures.  From page 108-173 Mr. Kmoch sheds a bright and insightful light on the handling of each pawn structure from both sides.

    In combination with the above you will have to build 5 memory banks into your mind.

    1.Basic checkmate (K+Q v K, K+R v K, K+2Bs v K, K+B+N v K) visualization pattern memory bank.

    2.Tactics visualization pattern memory bank

    When you can do the above 2 in your sleep the following will happen:  the correct move(s) will jump up off the board and smack you on the forehead in a flash

    3.Endgame technique visualization pattern memory bank

    4.Openings repertoire vvisualization pattern memory bank

    5.Middle game visualization pattern memory bank

    If you would like to know more detail about implementing a practice and study routine for the memory banks, please let me know.

    Good luck and hard study in becoming a 'professional gunslinger' (a very strong player)

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #11

    Mercurial1

    do u need computer chess analysis ...i can send what my engine say.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #12

    konhidras

    My friend i think you should have refrained from castling short because of his rook as h3. Second you got the wrong piece in this opening. Caro-kann is a knight maneuvering game so im a bit surprised you picked your bishop rather than the knight. The danger here is that he has a pawn at f4 and rook at h3 which sooner or later did do some damage in your position. From our last game we both noticed that your tactics need adjustments and you have the tendency to let your opponent get away from a difficult position wherein you dominate most of the time. Good luck on your next games.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #13

    Mercurial1

    please post the link of the pgn of the game that u want to analyze cause is easier to analyze them in chessbase or other gui.


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