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Developing Ability to win at Chess ~~ Generating Mindfulness & Compassion


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #1

    learningcoach

    Becoming a Master at Chess is to learn and apply the art of Objective Thought.
    When we move is it about knowing we are increasing our dynamic use of force,
    or is it a matter of 'hope he won't see it' most of the time?

     

    Are chess players interested in what the Buddha said should be done by one who walks in the way of truth?

    Please listen to the Metta Sutta in English.
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/33888310/01%20Metta%20Sutta%20in%20English.mp3
    NOTE -- Revised link that works. Thanks for letting me know. LC

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #2

    blackjokercz

    I guess that mindfulness and compassion, are not the real key to mastering chess. Chess is a lot about visualization, knowledge and patterns. What you can call mindfulness in chess is more like concentration and mechanical valuation of position. But mindfulness in Buddhism is (IMO) ability to observe even the slightest bodily functions and sensations to understand, how they begin and end to see the they are not I. So one shouldnt get distracted by them.
    btw: the link isnt working

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #3

    SocialPanda

    I don´t think that being in a compassive state will help to win, you need to have the motivation to fight.

    Otherwise if for example you are pawn less or with a worse position you will think: "i´m lost" and stop really trying to win, ok, the evaluation could be true, but you should even try to play.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #4

    Mandy711

    I think you are seeking ways to increase concentration ability. Viktor Korchnoi practices Ananda Marga yoga and meditation.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #5

    Citruslime

    Hoping your opponent doesn't see your attack is not a reliable method of winning. If he doesn't, good for you, but you need to enforce your assault so it works out regardless.

    As for compassion, be compassionate before and after the game. During it, be ruthless for all I care, so long as you are not breaking rules or being rude.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #6

    learningcoach

    Please refer to post number one.
    I revised the link to a four minute audio of monks chanting in English the Metta chant.

    Here is a longer audio about a topic which is highly relevant today:
    Being in Peace in a World of Conflicts

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/33888310/41%20Being%20at%20Peace%20in%20a%20World%20of%20Conflicts%20Ajahn%20Sumedho%2020101010.mp3

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #7

    Estragon

    Be at peace:

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #8

    learningcoach

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #9

    learningcoach

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #10

    sftac

    learningcoach wrote:

    Are chess players interested in what the Buddha said should be done by one who walks in the way of truth?

     

    How does what Buddha said relate to "developing ability to win at chess".  I mean, did Buddha even know how to play chess, let alone play it well?

    sftac

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #11

    pawnned

    Mindfulness in Meditation is awareness, and awareness is understanding, and understanding everything on the board is certain victory.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #12

    sftac

    Awareness is understanding?  Well, I suppose if you stretch the definition of awareness to the doctoral level.

    sftac

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #13

    Vo1d3mort

    Mindfullnes - yes, meditaion - yes, yoga - yes, but compasion = no. Compassion will make you not having the fighting spirit that you need to win. You sit there at the board and in front of you there is a human being that suffers from your moves. He is nervous, tries his best, and yet your moves are coming after him, setting him under pressure and finally crushing him. You think you will play better, when having compassion in this situation ?  If you feel compassion, you'll either give him willingly a win or draw or you will do that on a subconscious leves by making a blunder. A peaceful compassionate mindset does not go well together with chess (=wargame). You have to defeat your adversary and not having commpassion for him, because he will not hesitate to defeat you whenever you show a weakness.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #14

    Stephenson2

    learningcoach wrote:

    Becoming a Master at Chess is to learn and apply the art of Objective Thought.
    When we move is it about knowing we are increasing our dynamic use of force,
    or is it a matter of 'hope he won't see it' most of the time?

     

    Are chess players interested in what the Buddha said should be done by one who walks in the way of truth?

    Please listen to the Metta Sutta in English.
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/33888310/01%20Metta%20Sutta%20in%20English.mp3
    NOTE -- Revised link that works. Thanks for letting me know. LC

    Bobby Fischer is laughing from the grave.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #15

    learningcoach

  • 8 months ago · Quote · #16

    learningcoach

    Enjoy my reading of a favorite chess story:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/bb98c9fzw2myeys/Last%20Round.wma

  • 8 months ago · Quote · #17

    DrSpudnik

    I always come to the forums to get my daily dose of mindfulness and compassion! Laughing

  • 5 weeks ago · Quote · #18

    learningcoach

    Meet Cynthia McKinney:
    (after 2.5 minutes of intro by Richard Gage)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=_7mOvF86VRE#t=149

  • 5 weeks ago · Quote · #19

    learningcoach

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #20

    learningcoach

    The Internet’s Own Boy is a great new film about the internet prodigy Aaron Swartz.  We talk with filmmaker Brian Knappenberger about the impressive contributions of the young man who ended his life in January, 2013 while facing heavy-handed prosecution for a minor offense.
    www.peterbcollins.com/podcast/PBC_20140613p1150.mp3


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