Unusual Moves -- Don't Release The Tension!!!

Unusual Moves -- Don't Release The Tension!!!

EOGuel
EOGuel
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9

Hi, everyone!  Wow, it's been 20 days since my last blog post -- days can be so disposable at times!

Anyway, welcome to my series on unusual chess moves, moments where when you first look at the move played, you think to yourself, "wait, why did they play that?", but as we analyze it, there is legitimate logic to the decision. Once again, I will use this blog post to "brag" about one of my tournaments games, if you missed part one, check it out, and find the weird-looking move played!

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Black to move.

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So what do we notice in the position above? Material is equal. White has slightly more space on the Queenside, however, I want you to find White's weak squares. Look for squares, towards the center (because that's where my pieces would have the most impact), that are not defended by pawns. Yup, I'm talking about the e4 and d3 squares. White's light squares in the center are sensitive.

What you may also notice is that there is pawn tension with the c5-pawn and the b4-pawn, for Black and White respectively. As you may remember from my previous blog, my coaches taught me, and I teach my students that if there is pawn tension on the board, don't capture, don't sep away, just "Let it be". In other words, if you react to the pawn tension, your likely conceding some sort of advantage to your opponent, whether that be an open file, active pieces, etc. However, rules are made to be broken, right?

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As always, I hope you learned something from this! Shoutout to my first chess coach Sam Copeland who told me these types of moves are "no-nos", which they generally are, and he meant well, but ... sorry coach, sometimes, rules are made to be broken!

Anyway, feel free to leave a comment, send a friend request, etc. Hopefully, a new post is coming your way soon!