Analysing My Own Games: Why Suffer?

Analysing My Own Games: Why Suffer?

blohmoremoney
blohmoremoney
Feb 15, 2016, 6:45 AM |
0

Why suffer by choice?

 

I've never really had a philosophical think about the opening style I have as Black. Do you strive for counterplay immediately, or absorb pressure and fight for equality. This is the major lesson I took from this game where I was on the Black side of an Alekhines.

 

Do you ever play a game where you're not sure quite what went wrong. I'm still puzzled by a game where I was on the Black side of an Alekhine's defence. I had annotated it below, having given a lot of effort at the critical move 22 for Black.








 

I spent a lot of time in my blog review (below) analysing the best move for Black.

https://www.chess.com/blog/blohmoremoney/analysing-my-own-games-material-imbalance

GM Bojkov confirmed 22. ... Rd7 was best, but more so for the idea of ... Ne8 to defend f7 and prepare e6. 


Considering 5. ... exd6








 

Whilst I played 5. ... cxd6 (first time on the Black side of an Alekhine), GM Bojkov suggested I explore 5. ... exd6.

Ideas of ... Be7-f6 and Nc6 to place pressure at d4 for Black.

More so, one must be careful not to end up in one sided positions as Black. Playing in the "modern spirit" of setting problems for opponent as Black is something I'm not accustomed to. 

GM Bojkov also suggested the following model game by Ivanchuk.


Model Game by Ivanchuk

 

A highly instructive game by Ivanchuk in handling the types of positions Knights love. Strong outposts and fixed positions.
 
Observe how Black uses the dark squares at c5 and g3.
 
Powerful is the idea of advancing the f-pawn, and notice how all the manouevering occurs on dark square outposts c5, e5, e3 and g3 with ultimate transfer of the Rook to e3.
 

Cool Defence








 

I gave 24. ... Be6 in my analysis. This still leads to difficulties after 25. Bxe6 Nxe6 26. Nxf7 Ncd4 27. Bxd4 Nxd4 and White can torture Black for a long time.

An idea I failed to see was 24. ... Ne8 which prepares ... Be6 and defends f7.

After 24. ... Ne8 25. Bxc5 bxc5 26. Bd5 Rb8 27. Nxf7 Nxf7 28. Rxc5 Kf8 29. a4 Nd6 30. a5 Ba6 31. Rd1 Be2 32. Rd1 Nf5 Black just hangs on for equality.

Critical for Black is not exchange a Rook, as White can the invade the 7th rank.

That is difficulty to find, and still I have to replay again and again the moves to understand why.