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Millenium Chess Computer vs DGT Electronic Chess Board

adamsdp2001

I am debating about buying the Millenium Chess Computer or DGT Electronic Chess Board and wanted to post here for opinions.  Until now, I have played nearly exclusively on Chess.com - blitz rating ~1500 tactics ~2400.  I want to learn to play with more depth and have been doing tactic problems, studying each problem until confident of a solution (most of the time). 

I am thinking an electronic board that I can play against without time constraints will encourage me to patiently think through moves.  Also, I had a radio shack chess computer back in the early 80's so maybe a nostalgia factor.  I like wood boards and miss playing on them.  I could play games on the Hiarcs app on my Ipad and move the pieces on a wooden board as a inexpensive alternative but for some reason doesn't seem the same.  Again, could be the memories of playing on the old radio shack unit coloring my thinking.

If I got the DGT board, I would probably want to get the PI chess computer with it.  The DGT wooden board and PI computer are more than double the price of the Millenium unit but it looks nice and from what I have read, has more capabilites.  Any advice will be appreciated!

havb1961
adamsdp2001 wrote:

I am debating about buying the Millenium Chess Computer or DGT Electronic Chess Board and wanted to post here for opinions.  Until now, I have played nearly exclusively on Chess.com - blitz rating ~1500 tactics ~2400.  I want to learn to play with more depth and have been doing tactic problems, studying each problem until confident of a solution (most of the time). 

I am thinking an electronic board that I can play against without time constraints will encourage me to patiently think through moves.  Also, I had a radio shack chess computer back in the early 80's so maybe a nostalgia factor.  I like wood boards and miss playing on them.  I could play games on the Hiarcs app on my Ipad and move the pieces on a wooden board as a inexpensive alternative but for some reason doesn't seem the same.  Again, could be the memories of playing on the old radio shack unit coloring my thinking.

If I got the DGT board, I would probably want to get the PI chess computer with it.  The DGT wooden board and PI computer are more than double the price of the Millenium unit but it looks nice and from what I have read, has more capabilites.  Any advice will be appreciated!

I went exactly through the same questioning about a year ago and decided to go with the Millennium Chess Genius Exclusive, because you don't have to look at the computer screen to look for the moves (unless you use the speaker mode, which I do not like). The computer module offers a 2300 Elo-like maximum level, which is much more than mine. With the chesslink accessory you can use many different engines (through Chess for Android or Hiarcs on the PC). The DGT board is much more expensive and you'll also need to buy the DGT PI separately. The advantage (to me) of the DGT board is its size (tournament size) since the Millennium is not so big (40mm squares). In fact, Millennium is announcing that a bigger, tournament size (55 mm squares) board, will be available soon and compatible with all Millennium accessories (chesslink, King performance module, etc.). Just my opinion.

chessroboto

What I like about Millennium is their option to update their dedicated chess computers.

https://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-equipment/psa-millennium-king-performance-chess-computer-update

Boydcarts

I have the Millennium CGE and am pretty happy with it, and for me, being smaller than DGT was a selling point as it fits better in my playing space. I also have the ChessLink accessory so I can use HIARCS for iPad, and play against people online using the Millennium app. I also like the way Millennium uses lights to indicate moves. It’s nice never having to look away from the board. Certabo uses lights as well, but I like Millennium’s method better as they’re hardly noticeable when not in use.
One downside of Millennium CGE is that you’re stuck with the pieces it comes with. They’re not bad pieces, but for the price I’d have liked something a bit nicer. DGT offers a few different piece options, and with Certabo your options really open up. The other thing I’ll say about Millennium is the weird dichotomy of being well built with cheap materials. Everything is well jointed, smooth, and cleanly cut, but I have to admit I was surprised how light it felt when I opened the package the first time. That being said, if I were to do it all over again I’d probably still get the CGE , but Certabo would definitely be in the running.
As you can see, you’re going to get recommendations for a variety of systems, but regardless of which one you get, I highly recommend the auto recognition feature. Not having to press down on the pieces makes play feel very natural and setting up positions a breeze. I’d much rather have piece recognition than self moving pieces that need pressing.

adamsdp2001

Thanks for all the helpful replies!  I didn't even know about the Millenium CGE.  It looks nice on the website.  I definitely have a preference for a wood board.  In the long run, sound like getting the Millenium CGE or DGT would be worthwhile vs the pressure sensitive Millenium King.  I will have to mull over the options.  A lot of details to consider and good to know what the issues are.  

sangahm

I like the Millenium but upgraded the pieces to a better set, which is the advantage of not having to have specialized piece recognition.  And you get used to the pressure touch to move pieces very quickly -- it's certainly not the same push that older sets used to have.  And I like the fact that it can connect to Lichess, and I expect chess.com to be added later.

chessroboto

FYI, Millennium will come out with a tournament size wooden smart board soon.

Hamilton53

I have a DGT Smartboard and 3000 Pi. In my opinion, if you have a Windows based PC you don't need the Pi. The online options are simply more robust and your average PC is far faster than a Raspberry Pi. The Pi display and menu options will give you the nostalgia feeling of the early 90's (I don't mean this in a good way). If you have a Pi, enable capital letters and the display is easier to read.. From other posts, I suggest if you go with DGT to get "weighted" pieces. Some of the wooden ones are reportedly fairly light feeling. The DGT has the added advantage of being a tournament size board (55mm square size) compared to most other e-board options.

Now for what they don't tell you... e-boards are supported on many websites, but it definitely has the beta, under-developement feel to it. Chess.com currently, no longer has the option to use your e-board to play the bots. Sync-up can be a bit obtuse and awkward feeling. Games less than 15 minutes are not recommended. Some sights use the Live Chess software and others the Rabbit Plug-in. The latter hasn't been updated since 2012. 

However, with that said, it's a ton of fun, even with the quirks.