The Chess Set Display Grows

DrChesspain

Although I love all of the sets pictured, whenever I return to the thread I'm often initially disappointed, given that I tend to read the title as 

"The Chess Set Display Glows."

cgrau
BurnAmos wrote:

About your extraordinary sets and your exhibition-gift to the eyes and heart of those who enjoy chess pieces:
I’m  reading a splendid book by the Norwegian Erling Kagge "Silence: In the Age of Noise" and as such, I look at your pieces and can only feel the beauty touched by the silence.
The aesthetics and ethical beauty of a chess that passes alongside common mortals, and even a lot of chess players.

Since Chuck has a clear sense of community, of unselfishness, of true love of chess, of this "branch" of chess, everything that he provides in our eyes has an exceptional dignity, elevation and category.
You cannot even be envious, or whatever it is for your extraordinary collection, just admiration, thanks for not closing it with the keys, hiding it from the curious and invading eyes of our time, or even some comments that are no more than anonymous "shitstorm"  of whom neither loves nor understands anything of chess (and here goes one asking for alms in every post about chess pieces, which does not even bother me, amuses me by the hidden ignorance of knowledge and arrogance, in a mixture of stupidity and need of recognition that gives pity).
What Chuck brought to Chess.Com at Chess Books and Equipment is great in its simplicity, information, and beauty. What I learned from him about chess pieces, the moments of pure delight to look at are unpayable.

Thanks Great Friend and Geat Chess Lover.

 

 

 

You humble me, my friend.

cgrau
torrubirubi wrote:
cgrau wrote:

Completing this shelf is the set of the 1978 Buenos Aires Olympiad, the Campo Olimpico.

 

 

Nice set. As I see you have also a Solora clock. Not bad!

That particular clock was Frank Camaratta's tournament clock, back in the day. 

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torrubirubi

Great piece of chess history!  In Switzerland  we can sometimes find  one in flea markets for 10 or 15 dollars. People  know  a lot about  clocks in this country, but  few about  chess clocks.  However, my favorite  is not this,  but another  one,  almost  unknown in the world of chess collectors.  A Swiss clock with a terrific  design. I have two if them,  perhaps among the most interesting  pieces in my whole collection. Should  I post a pic here? 

cgrau
torrubirubi wrote:

Great piece of chess history!  In Switzerland  we can sometimes find  one in flea markets for 10 or 15 dollars. People  know  a lot about  clocks in this country, but  few about  chess clocks.  However, my favorite  is not this,  but another  one,  almost  unknown in the world of chess collectors.  A Swiss clock with a terrific  design. I have two if them,  perhaps among the most interesting  pieces in my whole collection. Should  I post a pic here? 

Why not?

kenardi

I want a chess room when I grow up.  grin.png

magictwanger

Have to admit,I think "cgrau" is as classic an act as his photos suggest.....Always surprising me with new stuff.

hamco53

Hello there, another member pointed out a knight you have in pic 4 that is very similar to the ones in a set I bought this weekend at an estate sale. The board has the early Drueke sticker and based on the fact that everything in the house was top of the line I think this set was probably sold with the board.  I was just wondering if you could shed any light as to where the pieces might have come from originally.  Thanks for your time - your collection is wonderful!

hamco53

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cgrau
Many thanks, Hamco. Your pieces are Spanish, Indajesa by name. https://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-equipment/spanish-chess-sets-7