Which is the best tactic book for a 1300 fide rated player

iniyan2007

Guys, I have a doubt about buying chess books which is the best for tactic chess books for 1300 fide rated player and another doubt is - Chess 5334 problems combinations and games book will it be suitable for 1300 fide rated player pls help me in it thank u in advance

brasileirosim
The most efficient way to learn tactics is using spaced repetition. And the best website to do this is Chessable. There you can try following books:

The Checkmate Pattern Manual for 29.99

or

Common Chess Patterns for 14.99

Perhaps you should begin with the second book and purchase the first one after 3 months.
Good luck!
MicaleWin

for your interest wink.png
https://www.instagram.com/chesstacticchannel

dannyhume
I think spaced repetition is good for rote memorization, but for pattern recognition and problem-solving that is applicable to different novel situations? I have my doubts.
Orozkovic

I believe if you want start playing a good chess I recommend 2 books 📚 My system wrote by Aron Nimzowitsch amd the second Chess Fundamental s by Raul Capablanca

RussBell

some tactics books recommended here...

Good Chess Books for Beginners and Beyond...

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/good-chess-books-for-beginners-and-beyond

Sred
Orozkovic wrote:

I believe if you want start playing a good chess I recommend 2 books 📚 My system wrote by Aron Nimzowitsch amd the second Chess Fundamental s by Raul Capablanca

Not exactly tactics books.

brasileirosim
dannyhume wrote:
I think spaced repetition is good for rote memorization, but for pattern recognition and problem-solving that is applicable to different novel situations? I have my doubts.

Yes, spaced repetition is good for learning tactics. In one of the books you learn 1000 common patterns showing the most common tactics,  in the other one you will learn the most common checkmates. Go to Chessable and try one of the free books to see how it works.

dannyhume
brasileirosim wrote:
dannyhume wrote:
I think spaced repetition is good for rote memorization, but for pattern recognition and problem-solving that is applicable to different novel situations? I have my doubts.

Yes, spaced repetition is good for learning tactics. In one of the books you learn 1000 common patterns showing the most common tactics,  in the other one you will learn the most common checkmates. Go to Chessable and try one of the free books to see how it works.

I am already a member at Chessable ... I simply find that going through 10,000 problems, each in a different position, is better for learning, understanding, and absorbing tactical patterns than is going through 1000 of the same problems 10 times each, because you do not memorize the answer. 

I do like Chessable as a way of reading a new book more thoroughly the first time because you play through the variations a few times each. 

Chessable also seems good for memorizing exact lines (for players at a higher level where that may be of use), but it seems to me as if players who are 400 points stronger than another, regardless of the level (whether a 2650 rated player advising a 2250 player or a 1400 level player giving "advice" to a 1000 level player) will say that the lower-rated player never needs to memorize and is otherwise wasting their time (until they become 400 points higher, of course) ...

I am sure if Komodo could talk, it would tell Caruana, Nakamura, and Carlsen that they are wasting time memorizing anything at all ("You really need to understand the logic of the position rather than memorizing a few lines analyzed in the Informants or by your team of seconds-- "weak" 2600-level grandmaster seconds-- you patzer").

chessroboto

And if AlphaZero could speak, it would only say one word to everyone, “Futile.”

brasileirosim

There are different ways to improve in chess. In my experience I see as pretty difficult to review regularly all the puzzles in a large book. For example, I did  a break with a 1000-puzzle book and had to review almost 900 puzzles I  the last 3 days. Several of these exercises I didn't remember.  Seeing from this perspective it is like doing the 10 000 puzzles that you mentioned.  The big advantage of spaced repetition is that once I will have all these positions in my deep memory .

 This will allow me to see similar patterns in my games.

Grecojin

Chess Problems, Combinations, and Games is a great book!

Most of the problems are mates in 1 or mates in 2.  The games are easy to understand and teach about attacking a castled king with a Bishop sacrifice on e2/e7.   Each game has one diagram normally just before the sacrifice, but no comments.