How do you learn Openings?

bong711

A. Use Openings Explorer and Database

B. Study Openings Manual like MCO and FCO

C. Study specific opening book like The French Defense Explained

D. Analyze Game Collection of One Opening

E. Watch chess video about Openings

Ginarook

I don't, maybe I should sad.png

bong711

If you play Daily only, Openings study isn't important. In Live games, the clock is ticking. One can't spend time pondering the first 6 moves.

Ginarook

Yes, pondering isn't much fun, is it happy.png

bong711
Ginarook wrote:

Yes, pondering isn't much fun, is it

No fun. I like to Dream...

 

DamonevicSmithlov

If I were starting chess all over again I'd do many things different, as in life. I'd go with c and d. I'd also add some videos about the goals/strategy of that openin along with the pawn structures that are related to it.

DamonevicSmithlov

I'd love to go to that place in the video and stay.

bong711
DamonevicSmithlov wrote:

If I were starting chess all over again I'd do many things different, as in life. I'd go with c and d. I'd also add some videos about the goals/strategy of that openin along with the pawn structures that are related to it.

I added your suggestion. E

PuffNStuff13

I could really use someone to teach me..

DamonevicSmithlov

Learning the pawn structures of an opening and how they guide your planning is huge. It's like a road map, almost literally a road map guiding ur play. That's why very strong masyers can play any opening, even stuff theyre not familiar with. It's the PAWN STRUCTURES they know so well.

Caesar003

from my own games, especially when when I lost, copy the game to the engine then figure out where I went wrong, take a lot of notes,, The next time I encounter the same opening I have better preparation.

bong711
Caesar003 wrote:

from my own games, especially when when I lost, copy the game to the engine then figure out where I went wrong, take a lot of notes,, The next time I encounter the same opening I have better preparation.

It would be simpler to check with the Openings Explorer to see what suboptimal move did you make. Engine analysis in the opening is reinventing the wheel.

Caesar003
bong711 wrote:
Caesar003 wrote:

from my own games, especially when when I lost, copy the game to the engine then figure out where I went wrong, take a lot of notes,, The next time I encounter the same opening I have better preparation.

It would be simpler to check with the Openings Explorer to see what suboptimal move did you make. Engine analysis in the opening is reinventing the wheel.

Thanks. I'll give it a try,,

blueemu

My method for learning an opening is to play it and lose.

Then I try to figure out why I lost... consulting with better players, checking books or databases, etc.

This might sound like an inefficient way to learn an opening, but you REMEMBER your losses.

bong711
blueemu wrote:

My method for learning an opening is to play it and lose.

Then I try to figure out why I lost... consulting with better players, checking books or databases, etc.

This might sound like an inefficient way to learn an opening, but you REMEMBER your losses.

It did work for you. Most of us won't wait for years to learn however. Thanks for the input.

vhin-1983

question: openings?

answer: repetition

 

IronIC_U
Hey PuffnStuff, I just challenged you to a game. Let’s play, and I’ll explain everything as we go? You will understand the openings, and their names, completely
andrewnox

I found this guide to learning chess openings quite useful.

kindaspongey

"... I feel that the main reasons to buy an opening book are to give a good overview of the opening, and to explain general plans and ideas. ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)

"... If the book contains illustrative games, it is worth playing these over first ..." - GM John Nunn (2006)

"... the average player only needs to know a limited amount about the openings he plays. Providing he understands the main aims of the opening, a few typical plans and a handful of basic variations, that is enough. ..." - FM Steve Giddins (2008)

"... Everyman Chess has started a new series aimed at those who want to understand the basics of an opening, i.e., the not-yet-so-strong players. ... I imagine [there] will be a long series based on the premise of bringing the basic ideas of an opening to the reader through plenty of introductory text, game annotations, hints, plans and much more. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2002)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627055734/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen38.pdf

"The way I suggest you study this book is to play through the main games once, relatively quickly, and then start playing the variation in actual games. Playing an opening in real games is of vital importance - without this kind of live practice it is impossible to get a 'feel' for the kind of game it leads to. There is time enough later for involvement with the details, after playing your games it is good to look up the line." - GM Nigel Davies (2005)

"... Review each of your games, identifying opening (and other) mistakes with the goal of not repeatedly making the same mistake. ... It is especially critical not to continually fall into opening traps – or even lines that result in difficult positions ..." - NM Dan Heisman (2007)

https://web.archive.org/web/20140627062646/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman81.pdf

bong711

C. Study specific opening book like The French Defense Explained

 

Nobody read Openings Book? Majority of books published are about Openings.