Sicillian Defence or King's Pawn Game?

timlim2005

If your opponent is White and plays e4, would you play the Sicillian or respond with e5?

Yigor

Sicilian is better imho. This statement is supported by the statistics of master games. stats.png

timlim2005

to be honest, I prefer the king's pawn game, but I try sicillian occasionally. I mostly play e5 though, because there are some complex ideas behind some variations of the sicillian.

Yigor
timlim2005 wrote:

to be honest, I prefer the king's pawn game, but I try sicillian occasionally. I mostly play e5 though, because there are some complex ideas behind some variations of the sicillian.

 

Yes, I can agree, usually KPG is easier to play and more straightforward.

timlim2005
cjxchess16 wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

to be honest, I prefer the king's pawn game, but I try sicillian occasionally. I mostly play e5 though, because there are some complex ideas behind some variations of the sicillian.

No, you only need to study the Svehnikov Sicilian and it better then 1.e4 e5:

  • 1.e4 e5 is MUCH more complex then then B33.
  • B33 prevents 0-0-0. compared to B34-B99.
  • 1.e4 e5 usually lead to draws.
  • Trivia:

 

what about the najdorf?

LouStule
Sicilian. Check out the thread "Is the Sicilian meant for experts only?" I'm no expert but I have posted many games showing my wins with the Sicilian.
ThrillerFan
timlim2005 wrote:

If your opponent is White and plays e4, would you play the Sicillian or respond with e5?

 

98 percent of the time, NEITHER!!!!!!!

 

Primary response to e4:  1...e6!

Secondary response to e4:  1...c6!

Occasionally played by me:  1...e5, intending 2...Nf6 against 2.Nf3.

timlim2005
ThrillerFan wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

If your opponent is White and plays e4, would you play the Sicillian or respond with e5?

 

98 percent of the time, NEITHER!!!!!!!

 

Primary response to e4:  1...e6!

Secondary response to e4:  1...c6!

Occasionally played by me:  1...e5, intending 2...Nf6 against 2.Nf3.

I have never played the french or caro-kann in a tournament before

GM_chess_player
cjxchess16 wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

to be honest, I prefer the king's pawn game, but I try sicillian occasionally. I mostly play e5 though, because there are some complex ideas behind some variations of the sicillian.

No, you only need to study the Svehnikov Sicilian and it better then 1.e4 e5:

  • 1.e4 e5 is MUCH more complex then then B33.
  • B33 prevents 0-0-0. compared to B34-B99.
  • 1.e4 e5 usually lead to draws.
  • Trivia:

 

The game you posted had a few blunders and i don't see why that would actually happen.And if I were white I would NOT make so silly blunders.Maybe I will do analysis on what stockfish says.

ThrillerFan
timlim2005 wrote:
ThrillerFan wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

If your opponent is White and plays e4, would you play the Sicillian or respond with e5?

 

98 percent of the time, NEITHER!!!!!!!

 

Primary response to e4:  1...e6!

Secondary response to e4:  1...c6!

Occasionally played by me:  1...e5, intending 2...Nf6 against 2.Nf3.

I have never played the french or caro-kann in a tournament before

 

Just because you've never played it doesn't mean the rest of the world can't!

 

Your original question is idiotic.  It doesn't say which one would prefer out of those two.  It says which would I play out of those two, and I gave my answer, NEITHER!  Black has 20 options, not 2!

timlim2005
cjxchess16 wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:
cjxchess16 wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

to be honest, I prefer the king's pawn game, but I try sicillian occasionally. I mostly play e5 though, because there are some complex ideas behind some variations of the sicillian.

No, you only need to study the Svehnikov Sicilian and it better then 1.e4 e5:

  • 1.e4 e5 is MUCH more complex then then B33.
  • B33 prevents 0-0-0. compared to B34-B99.
  • 1.e4 e5 usually lead to draws.
  • Trivia:

 

what about the najdorf?

The najdorf is way too complex. Like I said just study B33 for a year and you will become a master at the sicilian

I meant that the najdorf is way too complex, but you said that sicillian variations are easier to understand

timlim2005
ThrillerFan wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:
ThrillerFan wrote:
timlim2005 wrote:

If your opponent is White and plays e4, would you play the Sicillian or respond with e5?

 

98 percent of the time, NEITHER!!!!!!!

 

Primary response to e4:  1...e6!

Secondary response to e4:  1...c6!

Occasionally played by me:  1...e5, intending 2...Nf6 against 2.Nf3.

I have never played the french or caro-kann in a tournament before

 

Just because you've never played it doesn't mean the rest of the world can't!

 

Your original question is idiotic.  It doesn't say which one would prefer out of those two.  It says which would I play out of those two, and I gave my answer, NEITHER!  Black has 20 options, not 2!

i didn't mean to offend you. just making a comment

Wayne-Kenoff

"If you master B33 you will master the entire Sicilian" I can't wait until Thrillerfan reads that nonsense! As for the op's question, I play neither. Caro kann all day for me!

kindaspongey

Around 2010, IM John Watson wrote, "... For players with very limited experience, ... the Sicilian Defence ... normally leaves you with little room to manoeuvre and is best left until your positional skills develop. ... I'm still not excited about my students playing the Sicilian Defence at [the stage where they have a moderate level of experience and some opening competence], because it almost always means playing with less space and development, and in some cases with exotic and not particularly instructive pawn-structures. ... if you're taking the Sicilian up at [say, 1700 Elo and above], you should put in a lot of serious study time, as well as commit to playing it for a few years. ..."
In 2012, IM Greg Shahade wrote, "... These days ....c5 is more popular than ....e5, so who's to say that the lessons learned in e5 are somehow more valuable? It was by far the most popular opening in the past, but it's no longer the case. The lessons in the Sicilian, as irrational as they may seem to a relative newcomer, are very important to learn and who's to say that this type of action packed/dynamic chess is not just as good a way to start as the more classical style of chess. I definitely think that playing only 1.e4 e5 until 2000 is way too harsh a restriction in today's world of chess that is so much more than just classical 1.e4 e5 openings. That's not to say it's bad to play only 1.e4 e5 until 2000, but I think it's incorrect to assume that this is the proper way to approach chess development." Around the same time, he did acknowledge, "I specialize at teaching players who aspire to be pretty strong...like at least 2200, and usually higher, so I'm less skilled at helping 1500-1600 players without any particular ambitions to become great at chess".
In 2014, Pete Tamburro wrote, "... You will see [in Openings for Amateurs] the reply to 1.e4 to be the great reply of the open games with 1...e5. The Sicilian Dragon is presented as an alternative. ... I have found that scholastic players take to the Sicilian Dragon very quickly. ... A cautionary note: the Dragon is good at club level, but as you start facing better players you're going to find yourself memorizing tons of lines and the latest analysis, ... From my experience with coaching players below 1800, you won't need to do that too much. ..."

Wayne-Kenoff

@cjxchess the caro kann is not good???? Lmao yep you're an idiot. I love how you say it's "kinda not good" then admit you don't know anything about the caro kann. And your line is irrelevant to me because I play 3...c5 in the advanced.

penandpaper0089

Just play the move you like more. There was a guy here who played the Caro-Kann because he had to press the c6 button to get some cookies out of a vending machine earlier. It's not a big deal.

yanzhichen2007

Sicilian 

kindaspongey

Was it David Gerrold who suggested this method for coping with a difficult decision?

Step one: Flip a coin.

Step two: If you don't like the coin's decision, choose the alternative.