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how to improve your chess skills

  • #1

    first off this is for players that have less than 1500

    Im going to start with some questions try to answer those

    You think you can improve your current level?

    Do you practice but the results show other thing?

    Are you in the same level after years?

     

    If any of the answers was a yes this is for you, in the internet we can find thousands of books, thousands of games and off course a ton of problems an tactics but what to study? that is the big question, when you are a guy that doesnt have a teacher or a coach thats a really important question our time is not infinite but the things we can learn are infinite so before rushing and buy the first book i want you to know that books are important yes but is not everything.

    I create my account a while ago but only started to play like 2 years ago when i started i start with 1000 it was schoking actually becouse when i was a kid i knew how to move the pieces but only that and i thought i was going to be lower, anyway i reach the 1500 in 1 year without any book, reaching the 1900 was other story and in that one i use books and dirty tricks but we are not going to focus on that one now i know the most important things that are going to make you be better at chess but before telling you those its important that i mention what are the things that you cant do...

    1) BLITZ GAMES

    My favorites and the reason i stop improving, i was going from 1000 to 1900 in 2 years but thanks to that all i learn was to play on time and to play by tricks this is no real chess, now im tryng to play standard only, off course i play blitz sometime and the other reason its becouse in blitz you dont think that much, you improve when you force your mind to see more things, to do more things than usual blitz is not like that, i can play 50 blitz games in a day and im not going to be really tired but if i play 2 standard games(1 hour each plus 30 seconds each move) im going to end up really tired what it means is that i think in blitz you are not forcing your mind

    2) PLAYING AGAINST YOU OWN LEVEL

    these is actually really obvious you want to be stonger play against someone stronger, you really think you can be stronger if you only play against weaker or same rated opponents?

    3) NOT LEARNING FROM YOUR MISTAKES

    This one is really important and i mean analyse your games!!, I ve seen and played against players that for example move his queen early something that its bad the result i crush them and i give them the rematch and they just keep doing that, not the best way to improve

    4) Discipline

     

    I dont want to offend anyone here but lets imagine Im fat and i want to lose some pounds you think going to the gym for 3 days and after that eating burgers is going to work? the answer is no, everyone can improve a lot if each dedicate some time to your chess, i belive 1 hour a day is more than enough.

     

    These is not everything but i think i cover the most important details and as a way to help you guys and to push my coaching services Im going to give a free lesson to the first 5 persons in comment "i want a free lesson"(explain why you want it), I currently have 1760 on blitz and if you want my help just comment.

    I speak english and spanish

  • #2

    Hola, me llamo Antonio.

    Si quieres ayuda, yo estoy dispuesto para ayudarte.  Yo nunca he jugado juegos de ajedrez aqui en este website. 

    Si he jugado miles de juegos en mi carrera ajdrecista.  Hay muchos latinos que vienen ha este website buscando ayuda y haciendo preguntas.  Seria muy bueno que tuvieran un sitio adonde venir y tener sus preguntas contestadas.

    Como puedes ver yo hablo, escribo y leo en Espanol e Ingles.  And, of course in English I can tell you that I read, write and speak in both languages (Spanish and English)

  • #3

    cuanto elo tienes?

  • #4

    Tengo un elo de 2479 USCF.  Pero tengo 10 anos sin hugar en torneo.  Tengo 69 anos.  pero espero tener como 5 anos de mucha actividad.  Juego con fuerza de IM pero no se puede sostener en un circuito professional.  Proque la concentracion requirida para un torneo es demasiado fuerte para un cerebro de 69 anos.    Por eso no juego profesionalmente.  Pero para instruccion la experiencia y sabiduria en temas ajedrcisticos es muy fuerte.

  • #5

    I agree, although you don't have to play stronger opponents anymore - with engines, you just need to make sure you know what moves you did wrong, regardless of whether or not your opponent punishes you for them. 

  • #6
    I need help
  • #7

    What books did you use at first to get to 1900? I want to get to 1900.

    Also, if an hour is more than enough, what's enough? I work and am a pianist - I want to practice that, too. 45 minutes?

  • #8

    give me a lesson please

     

  • #9
    steelers1863 wrote:
    I need help

                                                                   ________________________

     

    Think of this list as an analysis tool.  Analyzing is taking a big complicated problem, like finding the right move(s) in a  chess position, and breaking the big problem into smaller simpler problems.  Think of the things on this list as  those smaller  simpler  problems that have to be solved in order  to solve the big problem of finding the right move(s) in a chess position,

    Think of this List as a set of pegs in the calculation tree.  The pegs in the list will be great climbing aids in climbing much higher in the calculation tree than you ever could before.  This list is your calculation big tree tool.

    Here is the list I have kept since I started playing chess:

    Things to do before I  make a move

    1. Am I sitting on my hands  now that I am seated at the chess board table?

    2. Is my written list in my possession?

    3. What is my opponent  threatening to do and what is my best move to stop his threat and  Kill as much of his counterplay as possible ( you will have to learn what killing counterplay is, and how to execute it on the chess board.)

    4. What is the pawn structure  on the board and what are the pawn break points? 

         a. Remember pawn moves are permanent because they cannot move backwards.

         b. Are there any pawn majorities on either side of the board?

         c. Are there any open or half-open files on the board?  Who is in control of that file?

         d. Are there any pawn weaknesses on the board?  You will have to learn about (doubled pawns,

             isolated pawns, backward pawns, etc.) and how to exploit those weakenesses

         e. Is the center blocked.  Flank attacks succeed more often when the center is blocked

    5. Are there any of  mine or enemy undefended Pieces and/or Pawns?

       a. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended indirectly. ( beware of tactics here!)

       b. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended backwards. (yes enemy pieces can defend their own backwards because pieces can move  forwards or backwards.  Pawns can only move  forward or  diagonally forward when capturing.

    6. Are there any weak square complexes in the position?   Learn what these are and how to exploit.  

    7. Have I checked all of these items above 2x before I make a move,

     

  • #10
    fieldsofforce wrote:
     

    7. Have I checked all of these items above 2x before I make a move,

     

    lol. That is serious dedication. I couldn't remember 10% of all that stuff!

  • #11
    divineanimal wrote:

    What books did you use at first to get to 1900? I want to get to 1900.

    Also, if an hour is more than enough, what's enough? I work and am a pianist - I want to practice that, too. 45 minutes?

                                                                       __________________________

     

    Your 45min of piano practice will inspire insights and creativity in your chess practice.

    Think of this list as an analysis tool.  Analyzing is taking a big complicated problem, like finding the right move(s) in a  chess position, and breaking the big problem into smaller simpler problems.  Think of the things on this list as  those smaller  simpler  problems that have to be solved in order  to solve the big problem of finding the right move(s) in a chess position,

    Think of this List as a set of pegs in the calculation tree.  The pegs in the list will be great climbing aids in climbing much higher in the calculation tree than you ever could before.  This list is your calculation big tree tool.

    Here is the list I have kept since I started playing chess:

    Things to do before I  make a move

    1. Am I sitting on my hands  now that I am seated at the chess board table?

    2. Is my written list in my possession?

    3. What is my opponent  threatening to do and what is my best move to stop his threat and  Kill as much of his counterplay as possible ( you will have to learn what killing counterplay is, and how to execute it on the chess board.)

    4. What is the pawn structure  on the board and what are the pawn break points? 

         a. Remember pawn moves are permanent because they cannot move backwards.

         b. Are there any pawn majorities on either side of the board?

         c. Are there any open or half-open files on the board?  Who is in control of that file?

         d. Are there any pawn weaknesses on the board?  You will have to learn about (doubled pawns,

             isolated pawns, backward pawns, etc.) and how to exploit those weakenesses

         e. Is the center blocked.  Flank attacks succeed more often when the center is blocked

    5. Are there any of  mine or enemy undefended Pieces and/or Pawns?

       a. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended indirectly. ( beware of tactics here!)

       b. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended backwards. (yes enemy pieces can defend their own backwards because pieces can move  forwards or backwards.  Pawns can only move  forward or  diagonally forward when capturing.

    6. Are there any weak square complexes in the position?   Learn what these are and how to exploit.  

    7. Have I checked all of these items above 2x before I make a move,

     

  • #12
    JamesColeman wrote:
    fieldsofforce wrote:
     

    7. Have I checked all of these items above 2x before I make a move,

     

    lol. That is serious dedication. I couldn't remember 10% of all that stuff!

                                                                      __________________________

     

    Even though it is essential to keep a hard copy of this list on your person at all times.  One of the main goals is to MEMORIZE this list.

  • #13
    CharkTie wrote:

    give me a lesson please

     

                                                                        ____________________________

    Think of this list as an analysis tool.  Analyzing is taking a big complicated problem, like finding the right move(s) in a  chess position, and breaking the big problem into smaller simpler problems.  Think of the things on this list as  those smaller  simpler  problems that have to be solved in order  to solve the big problem of finding the right move(s) in a chess position,

    Think of this List as a set of pegs in the calculation tree.  The pegs in the list will be great climbing aids in climbing much higher in the calculation tree than you ever could before.  This list is your calculation big tree tool.

    Here is the list I have kept since I started playing chess:

    Things to do before I  make a move

    1. Am I sitting on my hands  now that I am seated at the chess board table?

    2. Is my written list in my possession?

    3. What is my opponent  threatening to do and what is my best move to stop his threat and  Kill as much of his counterplay as possible ( you will have to learn what killing counterplay is, and how to execute it on the chess board.)

    4. What is the pawn structure  on the board and what are the pawn break points? 

         a. Remember pawn moves are permanent because they cannot move backwards.

         b. Are there any pawn majorities on either side of the board?

         c. Are there any open or half-open files on the board?  Who is in control of that file?

         d. Are there any pawn weaknesses on the board?  You will have to learn about (doubled pawns,

             isolated pawns, backward pawns, etc.) and how to exploit those weakenesses

         e. Is the center blocked.  Flank attacks succeed more often when the center is blocked

    5. Are there any of  mine or enemy undefended Pieces and/or Pawns?

       a. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended indirectly. ( beware of tactics here!)

       b. Beware of pieces and or pawns that are defended backwards. (yes enemy pieces can defend their own backwards because pieces can move  forwards or backwards.  Pawns can only move  forward or  diagonally forward when capturing.

    6. Are there any weak square complexes in the position?   Learn what these are and how to exploit.  

    7. Have I checked all of these items above 2x before I make a move,

     

     

  • #14

    good list, thanks

  • #15

    Yeah, I don't have the memory or the time to implement something like this in a game with only 2 hours for 40 moves. And luckily, it's not necessary. 

     

  • #16
    Cherub_Enjel wrote:

    Yeah, I don't have the memory or the time to implement something like this in a game with only 2 hours for 40 moves. And luckily, it's not necessary. 

     

                                                                         _____________________________

     

    The list has to be MEMORIZED.  After that in your mind they  become steps to breakdown the analysis of  the  position.  A step by step system of simpler problems to solve in order to find the best move(s) in the position.  Each  step can be thought of as a peg to climb a very tall tree.

    Think of this List as a set of pegs in the calculation tree.  The pegs in the list will be great climbing aids in climbing much higher in the calculation tree than you ever could before.  This list is your calculation tool for climbing the big big tree.

    Using the list with every move you make in a game, not only will you become faster because you have memorized it, but your continued use will make you practiced in what to look for in the position.

  • #17

     Which books, though? You are a 1200? I thought you were a 1900?

  • #18
    divineanimal wrote:

     Which books, though? You are a 1200? I thought you were a 1900?

                                                                               _________________________

    Notice that I have not played any games on chess.com.  1200 is an arbitrary rating that chess.com assigns to you.  I messaged with the name of a book

  • #19

    oh ok thx

  • #20

    thanks for all the coments

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