x
Chess - Play & Learn

Chess.com

FREE - In Google Play

FREE - in Win Phone Store

VIEW

Who is the greatest chess player of all time ?? Bobby Fischer ??

  • #1481

    As far as the world is concern Kasparov has the record that is undisputed and unmatched.

  • #1482

    @mcris, I have nothing to do with your arrogance, look elsewhere!

  • #1483
    ed1975 wrote:
    bobbyop2 wrote:

    Finally, he brought more MONEY into the game. In this respect he could be considered the greatest.

    How does bringing money into the game make him a great player? And did he do it out of philanthropy towards his fellow chess players or to line his own wallet?  

    Look up what Eidinow, Brady, Saidy, Evans and others who have lived through those times have to say about the Fischer years or the Fischer boom: for a year or two following Reykjavik it was as though money were falling from the sky; GMs and even some IMs could make a decent living out of chess alone. USCF membership doubled between 1971 and 1973 and peaked in 1974, and stores ran out of chess sets. Chess suddenly moved the front pages. Posters of celebrities ranging from actors to politicians playing chess were everywhere. It wasn't just money, it was exposure... a true phenomenon!

  • #1484
    lytonn wrote:

    @mcris, I have nothing to do with your arrogance, look elsewhere!

    You better study some dictionary, too.

  • #1485
    alinfe wrote:
    ed1975 wrote:
    bobbyop2 wrote:

    Finally, he brought more MONEY into the game. In this respect he could be considered the greatest.

    How does bringing money into the game make him a great player? And did he do it out of philanthropy towards his fellow chess players or to line his own wallet?  

    Look up what Eidinow, Brady, Saidy, Evans and others who have lived through those times have to say about the Fischer years or the Fischer boom: for a year or two following Reykjavik it was as though money were falling from the sky; GMs and even some IMs could make a decent living out of chess alone. USCF membership doubled between 1971 and 1973 and peaked in 1974, and stores ran out of chess sets. Chess suddenly moved the front pages. Posters of celebrities ranging from actors to politicians playing chess were everywhere. It wasn't just money, it was exposure... a true phenomenon!

    This may all be true, but did RJF ask for all the money that he did out of concern for his fellow chess players or for purely selfish reasons, and the money for the others came as a by-product?

  • #1486

    After 1972 he was offered milions of dollars by crowned heads to play demonstrative games, but refused. So, personal greed is out of the question.

  • #1487

    Dont feed the troll FIscher is best ever. I'm out!

  • #1488

    @ mcris, You are a rude person, I demand your banishment!

  • #1489
    ed1975 wrote:
    alinfe wrote:
    ed1975 wrote:
    bobbyop2 wrote:

    Finally, he brought more MONEY into the game. In this respect he could be considered the greatest.

    How does bringing money into the game make him a great player? And did he do it out of philanthropy towards his fellow chess players or to line his own wallet?  

    Look up what Eidinow, Brady, Saidy, Evans and others who have lived through those times have to say about the Fischer years or the Fischer boom: for a year or two following Reykjavik it was as though money were falling from the sky; GMs and even some IMs could make a decent living out of chess alone. USCF membership doubled between 1971 and 1973 and peaked in 1974, and stores ran out of chess sets. Chess suddenly moved the front pages. Posters of celebrities ranging from actors to politicians playing chess were everywhere. It wasn't just money, it was exposure... a true phenomenon!

    This may all be true, but did RJF ask for all the money that he did out of concern for his fellow chess players or for purely selfish reasons, and the money for the others came as a by-product?

    It was a bit of both. Selfish yes, but not purely so. To a certain extent he wanted to upgrade the game as he put it in one interview. Better lighting, larger venues, bigger prizes, better playing conditions in general. He felt that top chess players should be as rich and famous as athletes. And he also felt that the game should receive more publicity and more people should pick up chess, even if only as a past time. So by-product or not, his demands meant improvements for others too not just him, and he must have known it. Not all of these outlasted Fischer himself sadly, but that wasn't Fischer's fault.

  • #1490
    lytonn wrote:

    @ mcris, You are a rude person, I demand your banishment!

    Ignore him, @lytonn. You are far too sensitive.

  • #1491

    Having said that, he is right about Fischer, but we will have to live with that, both of us.  

  • #1492

    @camter, What I say about Fischer is true, correct!

  • #1493

    Un petit peu!

  • #1494
    lytonn wrote:

    @ mcris, You are a rude person, I demand your banishment!

    As Camter put it, you are far too sensitive, seek professional help.

  • #1495

    Indeed.

     Opinions differ from generation to generation, about how strongly the former USSR wanted to hold onto their position as far as chess hegemony was concerned.

    Being that Bobby was the first to challenge it, change the culture from even within their "own" players eventually says a lot. Going beyond the play. The game.

    Evidently, I don't need to repeat Garry's behavior after the fall

  • #1496

    this chart should put to rest any question of who the greatest is was and should be...

     

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_top_chess_players_throughout_history

    Scroll down to the chart that ranks the players based on 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 year periods and Kasparov knocks them all out of the park.

     

    One thing most people don't take into consideration, is that Kasparov was the first World champion to play and win against the world's best computer, until the programmers gave it an opening library. World champions, before the computer age, were not the same caliber of player you have today... ask any computer ;D

     

  • #1497

    We can say that a chess computer of the 90s was significantly less strong than a chess engine today, anyway in a 16-game match the best Kasparov would most certainly lose against Stockfish 8 !. Kramnik who is very strong against a chess engine loses in match against this one!

  • #1498

    Zurab Azmaiparashvili is very good.

  • #1499

    Paul Morphy

Top

Online Now