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How do I get out of 100/200 elo?

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siddirocks

For how long have you been playing? You are a quite new member.

Spr_chess_intermediate
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :
Evilbyte wrote:

Focus on the four squares in the middle and defend them for a few ganes.

I can play 1.g4 & 2.f4 to control the critical e5 square

Just get checkmated in 2 moves bro...

Zunayed_781038
Spr_chess_intermediate wrote:
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :
Evilbyte wrote:

Focus on the four squares in the middle and defend them for a few ganes.

I can play 1.g4 & 2.f4 to control the critical e5 square

Just get checkmated in 2 moves bro...

 

But the rook on h1 can capture the bq. And why will my opponent go for a wayward queen attack, it's against the opening principles!

Spr_chess_intermediate
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :
Spr_chess_intermediate wrote:
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :
Evilbyte wrote:

Focus on the four squares in the middle and defend them for a few ganes.

I can play 1.g4 & 2.f4 to control the critical e5 square

Just get checkmated in 2 moves bro...

 

But the rook on h1 can capture the . And why will my opponent go for a wayward queen attack, it's against the opening principles!

Bro, the rook on h1 cannot capture the queen because of the pawn on h2...

And this move checkmates the other opponent which is basically the point of the game!

In algebraic notation, # means checkmate, bruh...

Zunayed_781038

No no the rook can capture the bq by using the green spell. So Qh4+ is a blunder.

Spr_chess_intermediate
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :

No no the rook can capture the by using the green spell. So Qh4+ is a blunder.

This is not Spell chess, this is Standard chess for the sake of Maths!!

magipi
Spr_chess_intermediate wrote:
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :

No no the rook can capture the by using the green spell. So Qh4+ is a blunder.

This is not Spell chess, this is Standard chess for the sake of Maths!!

It is getting embarrassing that you're not getting the joke even after all this.

Spr_chess_intermediate
magipi a écrit :
Spr_chess_intermediate wrote:
Zunayed_781038 a écrit :

No no the rook can capture the by using the green spell. So Qh4+ is a blunder.

This is not Spell chess, this is Standard chess for the sake of Maths!!

It is getting embarrassing that you're not getting the joke even after all this.

This is a serious forum...

Zunayed_781038

ok

ArjuPlayzChess
ChessMasteryOfficial wrote:

To most of my students, I give this advice (and it's almost all they need):


The biggest reason people struggle in lower-level chess is because of blunders. They make them in almost every game.

A mistake can instantly put you in a bad position, no matter how well you played earlier: if you had great opening knowledge, great positional skills, great endgame skills, whatever; a single mistake can change everything (you lose a piece or get checkmated).


So, how do you avoid blunders? Follow these two simple steps:

1. After your opponent moves, think if it's dangerous. Ask yourself, “What’s his idea?”
2. Before you make your move, think if it's safe. Ask yourself, “What attacking replies can he play?”


If you feel like getting to levels like 1600, 1800, or 2000 in chess is super hard, let's look at it in a different way. Those players you're facing make blunders in nearly every game they play. Beating them isn't so tough if you stop making big mistakes and start using their slip-ups to your advantage.

Again, it does not require you to become a chess nerd or spend all your time on chess. Just doing this one thing can boost your rating by a few hundred points right away.


Lastly, while avoiding blunders is crucial, I also share a few basic principles with my students. These principles help them figure out what to do in each part of the game - the opening, the middlegame, and the endgame. Understanding these simple principles is like having a map for your moves. When you use this knowledge along with being careful about blunders, you're not just getting better at defending. You're also learning a well-rounded approach to chess. Keep in mind, chess is not just about not making mistakes; it's about making smart and planned moves to outsmart your opponent.

bro just wrote an essay on blunders?

lol good advice,thx!

Radioactive7

get better

Maciusplejgejms
Idk but good luck bro
Fizzleputts
ChessMasteryOfficial wrote:

To most of my students, I give this advice (and it's almost all they need):


The biggest reason people struggle in lower-level chess is because of blunders. They make them in almost every game.

A mistake can instantly put you in a bad position, no matter how well you played earlier: if you had great opening knowledge, great positional skills, great endgame skills, whatever; a single mistake can change everything (you lose a piece or get checkmated).


So, how do you avoid blunders? Follow these two simple steps:

1. After your opponent moves, think if it's dangerous. Ask yourself, “What’s his idea?”
2. Before you make your move, think if it's safe. Ask yourself, “What attacking replies can he play?”


If you feel like getting to levels like 1600, 1800, or 2000 in chess is super hard, let's look at it in a different way. Those players you're facing make blunders in nearly every game they play. Beating them isn't so tough if you stop making big mistakes and start using their slip-ups to your advantage.

Again, it does not require you to become a chess nerd or spend all your time on chess. Just doing this one thing can boost your rating by a few hundred points right away.


Lastly, while avoiding blunders is crucial, I also share a few basic principles with my students. These principles help them figure out what to do in each part of the game - the opening, the middlegame, and the endgame. Understanding these simple principles is like having a map for your moves. When you use this knowledge along with being careful about blunders, you're not just getting better at defending. You're also learning a well-rounded approach to chess. Keep in mind, chess is not just about not making mistakes; it's about making smart and planned moves to outsmart your opponent.

I disagree. I think his time would be better spent learning opening principles, doing tactics, and actually looking up his games in an opening database to see where he went wrong, and analyze his games by himself, then with a stronger player or a coach.

Sometimes his opponents do weird moves, or just play weird openings. He doesn't know how to take advantage of them. He needs a coach to stir him in the right direction about that.

Sometimes he just hangs pieces, probably because of tunnel vision. Look at chess vibes and see what he talks about with tunnel vision to learn more about that.

He plays a bad main opening. It doesn't follow opening principles. He needs a coach to tell him what he is doing wrong, and what to do instead. He needs someone to feed him suggestions.

You need a notebook, to write out when you lose in the opening, and then later drill it, over and over again, so you don't repeat those mistakes, or something like it.

This last bit was said by dan heisman. Dan Heisman also said, "you need to play 5 hour games or you will learn bad habits and not learn to really play chess." If you find enjoyment in 15 with 10 second increment, at least learn to take more time because right now you move too fast. In all of your games you had more time on the clock at the end then when you started, I think at least. Playing 5 hour games is optimal conditions, everything else isn't. But if for some reason you can't find time to play 5 hour games, remember it comes at a cost, and don't expect to improve much.

Some people can learn by just playing blitz or bullet, but that's rare. Call it a hunch, but I don't think you fall into that category. Just my two cents.

all in all your trying to reinvent the wheel with a new opening. Look up the opening, find out where you deviated from the main opening, and see. Make a final decision with either a stronger player, or a coach.

Now, that being said, I'm not sure if the person I quoted agrees with me or not. All I know is that I don't believe a checklist is helpful at beginner level. It will certainly help me if I learn to think about the move before I make it when I get a "feeling,'' but I don't think just applying a checklist will help, without, doing what I said. Maybe the guy I said agrees with that. I don't know. Maybe I am reading into what he is saying. A checklist will help, but the other stuff will help more. Maybe he meant to do both, and just didn't say, I dunno. I just wanted to reitrate, "You need help." The forums can't help you. They will give you generalized advice, like in this case, it's not complete. Yeah people always talk about opening principles, maybe he meant, do what he said, and all the other stuff. Idk, but don't think you'll get better by just applying a checklist. You need to learn your multiplication tables. Let me explain what that means.

Tactics, are your multiplication tables, and patterns, are everything else. you need to learn tactics, and different types of structures and the patterns within those structures. I just got this stuff from a chess article that will be found here:

https://www.chess.com/article/view/chess-patterns-patterns-everywhere

I've recently took a second look at my chess, and learned that I often don't calculate lines when I am unsure of what to do next. A habit I learned by playing only blitz. But that is only part of the equation. There is a whole lot more, and not enough time for me to write it all.

When you are learning new things, especially when you are trying to get better at chess, the inclination is to apply a learned principle when you see it, thing is, just playing it without thinking is not the answer, you have to calculate the variation that is on the board in your head so that you know it's the right sequence of moves.

The games are decided by who made the last blunder in 1800 level chess and below. Maybe even higher. The trick is to balance by adding other positives to your play (new tactical patterns, endgame studies, etc) with applying the checklist, and your case, learning opening principles. Sometimes people need to do more, because of all the crap they learned... or habits they learned and are having a hard time to get rid of, like myself.

I have been playing chess for over 20 years, and I didn't get to 1500. Learn from my mistakes, and play long games, and analyze them later with a coach or stronger player.

I hope this helps.

achanach

Gotta grind

only solution

Spr_chess_intermediate
achanach a écrit :

Gotta grind

only solution

I mean you are not wrong because that's how I do for chess puzzles...