What went wrong?!

CleverOak

https://www.chess.com/analysis/game/live/5267322192

This is my first game back after taking a break from chets to relax and study and get better. I came back and started a game. It was going well until the endgame. Neither I nor the analysis engine know what went wrong? I’m honestly sick and tired of losing games that I could have so easily won.

Strangemover

Hmm...you were never better in this game, your opening play was extremely dubious and you hung a lot of pieces. Your opponent also hung some pieces but you never managed to equalise. 

CleverOak

This opening, is it bad or just unknown?

Strangemover

1.a5 is a known but bad first move for black (because every single 1st move has been played some time). The corn stalk defence I think it's called. Cool name but that's about all that's good about it. 2.b5 is a blunder, white could have just gone Bxb5 but didn't. 3.Ra6 also bad...you are doing nothing to control the central squares and that rook is just misplaced. Then you hung your bishop and after that a knight fork losing your queen. It was easier for your opponent to win material because of the awkward way you developed your pieces. 

JamesColeman

Pretty much everything went wrong. The game gave the impression that every move was picked completely randomly (I'm not being insulting btw, just honest).

 

If you learn and follow some basic principles and focus on not giving away material you'll definitely improve!

limber_up

Chin up. You found fourteen BEST MOVES!!! That's really good for only six years' experience.

Laskersnephew

After move 12 you were a full rook behind. That may have contributed to your endgame problem

After move 16 you were a queen and a rook down. That endgame would challenge Magnus Carlsen

Ripley_Osbourne

Nothing "went wrong", you're just not doing the basic job that is to verify if you're not giving material away for nothing. No chess advice can help you here, but the total beginner one: "Take care of your pawns and pieces, and they will take care of you".

As you played in that game, you're not a general, but a butcher.

Deranged

I'm 90% sure this is a troll, but just in case you're being serious:

You broke basically every principle in chess. You didn't open properly. You didn't develop your pieces properly. You didn't control the centre. You constantly hung pieces. You ignored all of your opponent's threats. You just gave away free pawns, free pieces, even a free queen at one stage. And you're somehow confused about how you lost the game?

Instead of asking yourself what went wrong, ask yourself "what went right?"

On move 1 you played a terrible move which fails to develop your pieces and fails to control the centre.

On move 2, you played an even worse move: not only does it fail to develop your pieces and fails to control the centre, but it also hands your opponent a free pawn.

Why don't you just play a normal opening like this instead?

 

Deranged
CleverOak wrote:

https://www.chess.com/analysis/game/live/5267322192

This is my first game back after taking a break from chets to relax and study and get better. I came back and started a game. It was going well until the endgame. Neither I nor the analysis engine know what went wrong? I’m honestly sick and tired of losing games that I could have so easily won.

Wrong.

The analysis engine knows exactly what went wrong. It basically says you lost the game at move 3. Black's position is already helpless from that point onwards.

TeacherOfPain

Ok so the reason you lost this game is because your broke principles, lost tempi and along with losing tempi you played moves that didn't give a good purpose to your game. You were not improving the position and ultimatley your were making it harder for yourself. 

What I recommend for you to get better it to make better decisions in the opening. Play openings that give black(in this case) better chances to equalize in the opening and give good positions for the middlegame. I adivse that you study some middlegame positions and endgame positionsand you study the basic principles of the opening, middlegame and endgame. 

Once you understand the principles you will have the basic and some advanced understandings of the game of chess. From there I suggest that you study all of the basic things you need to know in chess such as:

Beginners/Intermediate Advice:

Stop playing blitz, and bullet. Play longer time controls of at least G45, or longer.
Follow Opening Principles:
Control the center.
Develop minor pieces toward the center.
Castle.
Connect your rooks.
Study tactics...tactics...tactics. One of my favorite quotes is this: "Until you reach Master, your first name is tactics, your middle name is tactics, and your last name is tactics”.
Double Check your moves. Before making a move, ask yourself: "Are my pieces safe?"
After your opponent moves, ask yourself: "What is my opponent trying to do?"
Analyze your games WITHOUT a chess engine, then have someone stronger go over the games, or post them online for review.
DO NOT memorize openings. Learn and understand the pawn structure, and piece placement for the opening you wish to learn.
Learn Basics Mates:
K vs. KQ
K vs. KR
K vs. KRR
Learn Basic King and Pawn endings.
KP vs. K
Opposition
Always rememer to have fun with it, especially if you just take chess as a Hobby!

Once you get these down packed you won't have positions that was shown in the previous games and you will be in good shape for your level and I wouldn't be suprised if you gained 300 or 400 points if you study these and put them very seriously into your game.

Now of course you probably understand some of these but it can only help if you improve on some of these principles and motifs and if you do you will be in better positions and will have much more to work with.

Hopefully this was helpful @CleverOak(btw nice, name it is not so random as other people's, not saying that others people's are bad happy.png)

Taurus478

My first observation: The opening used is better implemented if you are white, and wish to move second. I see you were focused on getting the rook and the bishop into play in the very beginning. These are not bad intentions. However, (and I know everyone is stressing this) you MUST grab hold of the center. Use pawns to build a chain link of sorts, back them up with your knights and bishops, then get your rooks into play. The rooks can wait for a few turns. The way I see it: rooks are best developed behind the lines. Don't try to squeeze them up and over your pawns. Instead, try to quietly shift them into the best file behind the pawns. You can do this by castling, or opening up the back rank by developing other pieces. When in doubt, take it slow. Try playing longer timed games first to work on your "if then" thinking. Taking it slow is the best way to warm up to a better, more efficient, quicker tempo.

Hope this helped!

CleverOak

Thank you all