Chess for Oldtimers --- Good Idea !


  • 7 days ago · Quote · #1761

    AlCzervik

    i don't care what anyone else here thinks of you, baddy. i like your knowledge of history.

    "those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it"

     

  • 7 days ago · Quote · #1762

    fightingbob

    badenwurtca wrote:

    Thanks for the posts.   ---   Today I want to post a quote from Isaac Newton: I don't know what I may seem to the world, but, as to myself, I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.   

    There is something quite insightful, humble, but also melancholy about Sir Issac's quote, badenwurtca; it is one I will have to remember.

  • 7 days ago · Quote · #1763

    PoolPlayerToo

    AlCzervik wrote:

    i don't care what anyone else here thinks of you, baddy. i like your knowledge of history.

    "those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it"

     

    or,

    "History has taught us that man doesn't learn from the past"

  • 7 days ago · Quote · #1764

    AlCzervik

    there are some that use the knowledge from the past, and, they may be leaders in the future.

    and, let me be clear. i don't mean political leaders-mlk held no public office.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1765

    HueyWilliams

    AlCzervik wrote:

    i don't care what anyone else here thinks of you, baddy. i like your knowledge of history.

    "those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it"

     

    And yet those who know history frequently do the same thing (as Henry Ford pointed out).

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1766

    HueyWilliams

    badenwurtca wrote:

    Thanks for the post Motherinlaw.   ---   It is rather sad and also somewhat ironic that not only do we know nothing at all when we are born into this world but then many of us return to a similar helpless state before we pass away.

    It's also rather apt.  After all, we take years to learn these skills--then take them all for granted when we're adults.  Only later on--when they are gradually stripped from you--can you see what a large accumulation it was.

    And--regarding that Jacques quote--I can't help taking his contribution with a grain of salt, since his character was after all rather an indulgent one (a sort of mopey Polonius). Wink

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1767

    HueyWilliams

    fightingbob wrote:

    There is something quite insightful, humble, but also melancholy about Sir Isaac's quote, badenwurtca; it is one I will have to remember.

    All of which is ironic in light of Newton's character, which seemed rather prickly and persnickety. Wink

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1768

    fightingbob

    HueyWilliams wrote:
    badenwurtca wrote:

    Thanks for the post Motherinlaw.   ---   It is rather sad and also somewhat ironic that not only do we know nothing at all when we are born into this world but then many of us return to a similar helpless state before we pass away.

    It's also rather apt.  After all, we take years to learn these skills--then take them all for granted when we're adults.  Only later on--when they are gradually stripped from you--can you see what a large accumulation it was.

    And--regarding that Jacques quote--I can't help taking his contribution with a grain of salt, since his character was after all rather an indulgent one (a sort of mopey Polonius). 

    If by indulgence you mean Jaques thinks but never acts, then your criticism is a typically American one reflecting a can-do attitude that with sufficient optimism everything can be put right.  Willy Loman believed the world was his oyster if he had a smile on his face and a shine on his shoes, and we know where that got him.  The Brits know better, and so does history.

    As far as Jaques indulging in cynicism just to hear himself speak, that is found in the director's and actor's interpretations and not in the text.  I guess a similar charge of indulgence could be leveled at a well known contrarian who enjoys his textual monkey wrench thrown in the works to provoke a reaction. Wink

    Anyway, I prefer to think of Jaques as this Wikipedia entry describes him, namely as a character providing "a sharp foil for the wit of other characters, but also to create a shadow within the sunny forest. Jaques is a constant reminder that in the real world time is not suspended, and grief, sorrow and death provide a counterpoint to all human joys, a kind of embodied presentiment of Poussin's 'et in arcadia ego'."

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1769

    fightingbob

    HueyWilliams wrote:
    fightingbob wrote:

    There is something quite insightful, humble, but also melancholy about Sir Isaac's quote, badenwurtca; it is one I will have to remember.

    All of which is ironic in light of Newton's character, which seemed rather prickly and persnickety. 

    Yes, it is ironic.  Though a bit too Freudian at times for my taste, this entry at The Newton Project reveals a complicated man and not the black and white caricature some authors have portrayed.  The truth is, what makes us good makes us bad, and, naturally, vice versa.

  • 5 days ago · Quote · #1770

    badenwurtca

    Thanks a lot for all of the nice new posts.

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #1771

    badenwurtca

    There is a nice new thread on the go here that ties-in somewhat with this one. It is entitled " Tales of a Septuagenarian " and the OP is Ponz111. 

  • 3 days ago · Quote · #1772

    HueyWilliams

    Uh-oh, I'm a typical American (thanks, fightingbob)!

  • 10 hours ago · Quote · #1773

    motherinlaw

    HueyWilliams wrote:

    Uh-oh, I'm a typical American (thanks, fightingbob)!

    I hesitate to contradict anyone, especially you, fightingbob, but I must say HueyWilliams seems pretty atypical ... in almost every way I can think of. :-)

  • 6 hours ago · Quote · #1774

    fightingbob

    motherinlaw wrote:
    HueyWilliams wrote:

    Uh-oh, I'm a typical American (thanks, fightingbob)!

    I hesitate to contradict anyone, especially you, fightingbob, but I must say HueyWilliams seems pretty atypical ... in almost every way I can think of. :-)

    On that note, Mil, here is a tribute to Mr. Williams and the most "atypical," surreal childrens show ever to appear on Saturday morning TV: H.R. Pufnstuf.  It's Dali does puppetry in the guise of Sid and Marty Krofft.

    I forgot Jack Wild played the boy, but I certainly remember him in Oliver!  Perhaps Mr. Williams ought to take up the nom de plume, The Artful Codger. Wink


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