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I keep dying in chess

  • #21

    just work on tactics....

    And understanding if your piece is hanging...

  • #22
    TameLava wrote:

    just work on tactics....

    And understanding if your piece is hanging...

    Or your member

  • #23

     Right off the bat.  I can say that more than a few of your moves just don't make sense.  I guess a good first start might be to ask yourself "why am I making this move?".  

     

    Lets start with 5. O-O Nd4.  Why is the knight going to d4?  True it would be nice to have a knight in the center...but can you keep it there?  Are there other more important things to be doing?  Furthermore, was there a reason to prefer keeping it on it's original square?  First note that when you moved the knight you removed the protection of the e5 pawn (hence white could respond Nxe5 with advantage); in this type of setup controlling the center is important so we want to keep that pawn!  Furthermore the knight can be ejected by c3, a move that white (or at least should) wants to play to prepare d4 and take the center!  Perhaps the even bigger sin here is you're behind in development and moving a piece twice in the opening.  Don't try to be aggressive if you haven't completed development.   Much stronger here would be O-O or d6.

     

    Ok all that out of the way we arrive at Bg4.  You're developing with tempo here, and that's probably not a sin.  I and the computer both agree that a dark squared bishop trade is probably strongest to avoid doubled pawns and gain some tempo on white's recapture.  And Bg4 runs into Qg3, which is not trivial to deal with after h3. 

     

    9.  Qe7 similar complaints.  I don't see a compelling reason to move the queen there.  I still prefer trading off the bishops here.  I might give you a slight pass here if your intent was to follow up with O-O-O and avoid taking white's likely kingside attack head on; if not for the fact that doing so will cost you the g pawn with the queen on that file.  There is a defense here, but it's really tough to find.  9... Bxe3 10. fxe3 h5 11. h3 h4)  This ejects the queen from g3 with equality for both sides.

    10. ... Be2.  I have a simple question, what was your goal here.  Yes this attacks the rook, but you will be attacked by that rook next turn, after which the only way to save your bishop will be to waste another turn playing Bh5, and still haven't solved any of your problems.  You were pretty much required to trade bishops and push the h pawn.

     

    The rest doesn't deserve analysis, you just hung your pieces.  The basics are focus on developing your pieces, and make moves that have a reason behind them.  As an exercise look back at how many times you moved your queenside knight in the first ten moves.  I won't say that you should never move a piece multiple times in the opening (that's not true), but you should have a clear motive for doing so.  Active pieces are happy pieces, and the more happy pieces you have the better the position.

     

    If you're fairly new this is going to be a big hard step.  You have to move past 3 ply calculation of every move you can think of and start looking at moves that DO something and using your time to calculate those deeper.

  • #24

    thanks for you're help everyone.  thanks to your tips i managed to ACTUALLY get an opponent to checkmate.  I found your help very helpfull.  here is THE game:

    Now that I know how to get a checkmate early, I think ill start to play with that in mind.

     

  • #25

    But if he did not 50% of the time that would mean i could win half my games.  that is much better than how i was doing before

     

  • #26

    sigh....

  • #27

    You keep dying in chess, but you also keep respawning.  How do I defeat you once and for all so you won't ever come back?  I am not as yet willing to drive a stake through the virtual chessboard on my monitor.   

  • #28

    I think i am starting to figure this out.  I'm don't know if the spelling is right, but i seem to be doing really good with the "EGMOND GAMBIT"  here is a game i just used it on a guy with:

      I think this might be a good way to start each game.  I really like this way to start.

  • #29

    It's Englund Gambit.

  • #30

    But transposed to Old Indian so it wasn't Englund gambit afterall.

  • #31
    EscherehcsE wrote:

    OP - "I keep dying in chess"

    Sort of a chess version of "Groundhog Day"?

    It's not "Groundhog's Day, it's "Happy Death Day".

  • #32
    vantangler wrote:

    I keep dying when i play chess!  i know i there are somthings  can get better at, but i keep dying no matter what. sometimes i do pretty good and the clock actually runs out, but that doesnt happen enough.   i think I should get better with my pwns, (get them to the other guys back row faster) but they keep getting killed.  here is an axample (i try to reorganize them):


    .  If there are any tips you can offer that would be good my goal is to be really good and stop looking at the game over screen!

    The main problem most novices have is not trying to evaluate a position and, therefore, not working on improving their evaluations.

    Chess is very simple: You have a position and try to reach a position you've evaluated as better than the current one. This isn't achieved by single and disconnected moves, but whole concepts of where your pieces should be to achieve your goal. At any rate, you need some form of basis for an evaluation, or you won't know if you need to defend, to prepare, to attack, etc., or if the position you're heading to is good, equal or worse than what you currently have. In other words, if you can't evaluate then you're wandering.

    Now, the most important thing to evaluate is the piece activity. A fancy word for the direct, latent and potential threats on the board. Working on tactics training will improve your pattern recognition for several motifs (themes).

    But there's a simple trick to detect where to pay attention for activity. Imagine your pieces have green laser lights and your opponents' have red ones. Those lasers can lit things x–rays like. Now, pay attention to the pieces marked by red and green. If there's a red light in one of yours, check if it has a green light as well (that is, if it's defended), and also if the trade wins material for anyone. Now repeat the process with the opponents' pieces. When finished, you'll be able to determine which are the direct threats on the board. Potential threats involve mentally moving the pieces a bit. Latent threats involve moving several pieces more than a bit.

    You may wonder why the laser thing. Well, the moment you see a sector all lit in a color, the moment you know where to make play, or defend against.

    Now, all this isn't enough to get an accurate evaluation of a present or future position, but is the first step as you shouldn't be hanging pieces nor missing opportunities once you're used to this method.

    Finally, if the time control is too fast for you to use this method, play slower controls. Build precision first, speed later.

    Just my 2 cents.

     

  • #33
    vantangler wrote:

    But if he did not 50% of the time that would mean i could win half my games.  that is much better than how i was doing before

     

    Congratulation for your win! Look, you really should not play moves only based on the hope that the opponent will not see the threat. Check this game here to see what I mean with this:

    https://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/how-to-post-a-game-the-simple-way?page=1#last_comment

  • #34

    I think i know what you mean torrub.  here is a good example where i show some restraint.  I use the Kings gambit declined as white, witch i heard was good.  I try and force a draw in the end and lost, but i think this illustrates you point.

     

  • #35

    Here is another game where i obviously command a graet opening.  I learned that morphey was a great player... so i think i want to start playing more like him.  I this game i use the kings pawn opening.  It looked like is was going to be a draw, so im not too sure if i lost 100%, but i did quit because he may have won in a few moves. 

     

  • #36

    Pawn moves like a3 and h3 are only played with a good reason, otherwise you are losing time. If you want to castle kingside, h3 is weakening the kingside, which can be explored by your opponent. In the five first moves you did 4 pawn moves! Follow opening principles: one pawn in the center, perhaps two, and develop your pieces.

  • #37
    torrubirubi wrote:

    Pawn moves like a3 and h3 are only played with a good reason, otherwise you are losing time. If you want to castle kingside, h3 is weakening the kingside, which can be explored by your opponent. In the five first moves you did 4 pawn moves! Follow opening principles: one pawn in the center, perhaps two, and develop your pieces.

    You’ve no flesh on your face

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