Special notation sheet for young kid?

HolographWars

Don't remember anyone FIVE taking notation at a tournament, even in my early years...

GM_chess_player
HolographWars wrote:

Don't remember anyone FIVE taking notation at a tournament, even in my early years...

Yes +1. When I go to tourneys, starting from K-5, you had to take notation.

GM_chess_player
HandsomePuma wrote:

I'm writing this on behalf of my younger son (not the one whose account this is).  He is in Kindergarten, has not the best fine motor, hates to notate, scribbles, unreliable, messes it up. He's about 800 USCF, and many of his opponents notate well (mostly 1st - 2nd graders).  Coach is frustrated because we don't know what he doing in his games.

I had an idea of creating a custom sheet where he could circle on each move a piece type, a square letter and number, and an "x" for a capture.  It would be big print.  Is this silly?  Any other ideas?  We are at a loss.

Why don't you get one of those real life coaches? They come to ur house and teach that child notation. Or go to a chess club.

batgirl

If someone told me to notate when I was five, I would have bitten him.

And rightly so.

llamonade
HandsomePuma wrote:

I'm writing this on behalf of my younger son (not the one whose account this is).  He is in Kindergarten, has not the best fine motor, hates to notate, scribbles, unreliable, messes it up. He's about 800 USCF, and many of his opponents notate well (mostly 1st - 2nd graders).  Coach is frustrated because we don't know what he doing in his games.

Well, on behalf of your younger son, let me just say, ffs just let the kid play and enjoy himself.

GM_chess_player

Also, who is the coach?

oregonpatzer

This question reminds me of a story I heard long ago.  As you may know, Orthodox Jews are not allowed to compete in chess tournaments on the Sabbath, a rule notably observed by Sammy Reshevsky.  Apparently, the two sticking points are punching the clock and writing down the moves.  A rabbi in Tel Aviv came up with a workaround for this.  He approved the use of any other part of your body (your elbow, your head, etc.) for punching the clock, and he devised a system of 3x5 cards with the moves already written down and places where you could attach paperclips to get around the no writing rule.  This workaround has met with skepticism, and since our Hebrew brethren lack a central authority to adjudicate doctrinal disputes, I expect it to remain controversial, so proceed at your own risk.    

saiea

''Coach'' I am finding this hard to believe. do you mean you're paying for a coach to teach him at 5 years old? do you plan on having him become a GM or something?

Ziryab

I have coached five year olds who notate and eight year olds who don't. The one who did the best at that age was kindergarten state champion. In my state, youth events are not USCF rated, but rated by the Northwest Scholastic Rating System. We still follow USCF rules, but with a few deviations, such as not requiring players to notate.

Locally, we encourage notation with promises of game analysis, usually by a master or expert chess player, and raffle tickets. Some kids take a few years before they become comfortable notating. Some never do. 

Emphasize fun and teach basics during lessons. There is little need to vigorously correct errors made in games when the child is young and rated 800. If the young player enjoys the game, he will eventually start notating them.

HolographWars
GM_chess_player wrote:
HolographWars wrote:

Don't remember anyone FIVE taking notation at a tournament, even in my early years...

Yes +1. When I go to tourneys, starting from K-5, you had to take notation.

(*racks memory*) Oh ah there’s one.

dcb1970

My older son (8) played a 1600 kid last year and she ended up losing the endgame, partly from time duress. The parents asked for our scoresheet as their kid stopped notating before she blundered. We happily let them take a picture. The girl was a good sport and no reason the 2 kids cannot develop a reasonable chess interaction, as they will see each other again at national / state events. 

 

BTW - ChessNoter is the way to go.  No one is using any other notation device now at the scholastic level at least. Kudos to Joey Troy for developing it.

MooseMouse

Update:  Just did the research, and of the four electronic devices that are USCF approved to assist with notation, the only one currently available is ChessNoteR, and it's getting good reviews.  You might check it out.  http://www.campfirechess.com/chessnoter-forges-a-digital-pathway/  and https://www.huntsvillecc.com/chesstech-chessnoter-receives-uscf-approval-for-use-in-tournaments/ .