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What is Caruana trying to prove?

  • #21
    ManlyLadyLumps wrote:

    Disregarding the fact that playing on hoping your opponent will die in the mean time is horribly unprofessional, if not straight up immoral, you can't forget that these supergrandmasters have the technique to win with such slight advantages, i wouldn't be surprised if Nakamura could win against Houdini from the position blindfolded. Even if he gets horrible indigestion, it would either be called a no contest or he would win despite his condition because these guys are just that good

    I doubt that anyone is hoping thier opponent will die. Its just playing to the fact that given that a corospondance game usually lasts 1 1/2 to 3 years that it's a real possibility. Corospondance GMs do win a few games that way, and when it's their time to go they lose a few that way. Its part of the natural order of things, not unethical at all, but fully expected.

  • #22

    He had a right to carry on. If a position is hopelessly lost it shouldn't bother the winning player that the other person wants to carry on. If you know your stuff you can makes moves quickly, pile on the time pressure and the other, losing player should crumble. If you can't manage that then, well...the position wasn't so hopelessly lost to begin with.

  • #23
    idreesarif wrote:

    you should also keep in mind that this tournament is very very important for him ...... If he wins the tournament, he will finish 2nd in Grand Prix and qualifies for the next candidates ...........

     

    No, he is mathematically eliminated from qualifying by finishing 1st or 2nd in the Grand Prix.  He may still qualify by rating, though, although his recent gyrations might put that in jeopardy.  Kramnik winning the World Cup means the "high rating" entrants will be one notch lower.

  • #24

    I think he played on because he was in shock.  IMpfren noted it must have been a "fingerfehler" move, Caruana is young and hasn't committed such a blunder at this level that I can recall.  

    He probably just kept playing because he was reeling from the error, then he saw the desperation attack against the King and went for it.

  • #25

    Can someone post the game, please?

  • #26

    Scroll down past the report, it's the first game.

  • #27

    thanks

  • #28
    Estragon wrote:
    idreesarif wrote:

    you should also keep in mind that this tournament is very very important for him ...... If he wins the tournament, he will finish 2nd in Grand Prix and qualifies for the next candidates ...........

     

    No, he is mathematically eliminated from qualifying by finishing 1st or 2nd in the Grand Prix.  He may still qualify by rating, though, although his recent gyrations might put that in jeopardy.  Kramnik winning the World Cup means the "high rating" entrants will be one notch lower.

    The rating spots were decided based on old rating lists, so Aronian and Kramnik got those long ago, or maybe that should be Aronian and Karjakin after Kramnik won the World Cup. Caruana is not mathematically eliminated from second place in the Grand Prix series though. He just needs to be sole first here, and if he beats Gelfand with white today he will probably be shared first with three rounds to go.

  • #29
    fabelhaft wrote:
    Estragon wrote:
    idreesarif wrote:

    you should also keep in mind that this tournament is very very important for him ...... If he wins the tournament, he will finish 2nd in Grand Prix and qualifies for the next candidates ...........

     

    No, he is mathematically eliminated from qualifying by finishing 1st or 2nd in the Grand Prix.  He may still qualify by rating, though, although his recent gyrations might put that in jeopardy.  Kramnik winning the World Cup means the "high rating" entrants will be one notch lower.

    The rating spots were decided based on old rating lists, so Aronian and Kramnik got those long ago, or maybe that should be Aronian and Karjakin after Kramnik won the World Cup. Caruana is not mathematically eliminated from second place in the Grand Prix series though. He just needs to be sole first here, and if he beats Gelfand with white today he will probably be shared first with three rounds to go.

    absolutely right fabelhaft ......

  • #30

    I was playing ten minute game and my opponent had a completely lost position. He would not move, I disconnected and reconnected thinking I could trick him into moving and viola he moved when he saw I disconnected. THAT is poor sportsmanship. Playing on for a few moves after a blunder is not poor sportsmanship in my opinion. Especially if he resigned a bit later.

    He was probably disgusted with himself as well as flustered and when he regained composure saw that he should resign. A loss like that OTB is a gutting feeling and can shake you up.

  • #31
    Estragon wrote:

    I think he played on because he was in shock.  IMpfren noted it must have been a "fingerfehler" move, Caruana is young and hasn't committed such a blunder at this level that I can recall.  

    He probably just kept playing because he was reeling from the error, then he saw the desperation attack against the King and went for it.

    I don't think it was a "fingerslip." Caruana spent a lot of time on that move (this was said in his post-game commentary). He couldn't explain why he made that move. He said that he remembered a game where fxg6 was played. But in the end he just played a bad move like all humans do.

  • #32
    Krestez wrote:
    Yea, but I don't see the point in playing on. Nakamura knows his stuff. When I saw Nb3 I was like WAT?? Nakamura was very shocked too. I thought Caruana was trolling.

    What you didn't see, was the poker game later. Caruana was playing Grischuk, bluffs with nothing, and beats Alexander. Nakumuru, who was watching the game, tells Grischuk:

    "Nothin'. A handful of nothin'. You stupid mullet head. He beat you with nothin'. Just like today when he kept comin' back at me - with nothin'."

    Caruana tells Nakumuru:

    "Yeah, well, sometime's nothing is a real cool hand."

    Nakamuru joins the game and says:

    "Let me sit next to my boy--Cool Hand Caruana..."


  • #33
    pfren wrote:

    Apparently 14...hg6 is a fingerslip, taking with the other pawn is mandatory. GM Postny seems to have done quite a bit of homework in that line.

     


    Mr. Houdini claims that 20.Nh3 is almost a blunder due to 20...Nxf3, but things are not clear at all- the game is reminiscent to Russian roulette.

    Yes Pfren, but I don't get why not black takes the rook in move 25 or 26. Also why it's 1-0 after whites move 27 when black just can take on d2 and win? 

  • #34

    Caruana played on in order to avoid the double embarrassment of losing badly and having given Nakamura a miniature. He played on past move 30 to make the score look respectable. Years from now, when people are looking at databases of the games between Naka and Caruana, this game will not stand out from the others.

    Perhaps resignation was better, but playing on past move 30 is fairly common among GMs who blunder early.

  • #35

    Didn't Nakamura drag out a game against Aronian earlier this year?

  • #36
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #37
    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • #38
    steinof wrote:

    Yes Pfren, but I don't get why not black takes the rook in move 25 or 26. Also why it's 1-0 after whites move 27 when black just can take on d2 and win? 

    You are right not understanding. Apparently the last moves are registered wrongly, but this is exactly how they appear in the TWIC database.

  • #39

    Probably that he's really good ^_^

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