Why do I keep blundering?

NamNam2019ishKnight

My rating is in the 700s range in the USCF system, and the last tournament I went to I lost to both a 400 and 600. What is going on, and how do I stop blundering?

NamNam2019ishKnight
WeakLava wrote:

Looks like you move to fast.  You play blitz, bullet, and rapid.  All of which do nothing but reinforce bad habits (moving fast - no time to think)

Even in your daily games, youre moving fast.

Thank you for you advice, I will keep that in mind. 

Sred

Solve simple puzzles without time pressure. Some people recommend using a checklist (just google chess checklist to find recommendations).

Strangemover

Each time you are about to make a move, stop yourself and double check. Sit on your hands. 

Caesar49bc

Slowing down and using more time for moves will help a lot. Just yesterday I was playing someone and was focused on one side of the board. Anyway, I'd been so focused on one side of the board, I nearly missed an easy mate-in-2 on the other side of the board.

Although I must admit, I had a strong game going on the right side of the board, but it's easy to get so fixed on a strong attack that you forget to look for easy tactics on other parts of the board.

In the endgame, if I'm in an overwhelming position, I don't go out of my way to look for mate-in-2's if I know I can whip out a few extra moves for a known win. Some of the endgame mate-in-X positions can be pretty difficult, and if time is an issue, it's safer just to move to a known win, especially with time increment where you can gain time just moving fast.

NamNam2019ishKnight

Thank you for your thoughtful suggestions! 

NamNam2019ishKnight
ghost_of_pushwood wrote:

Because...well, you're not very good.  And I don't say that to be mean; what I mean is that it's natural for you to overlook things--lots of them--early on.

You can try "blunder-checking" and that sort of thing.  But I think the best way to overcome blunders (and of course you never entirely overcome them) is to improve generally.  Just keep practicing and playing--and throw some study in there too, if you want.

Of course it's frustrating to keep overlooking stuff and have all your plans get sabotaged by unfortunate mistakes.  But that's how chess can be sometimes (and at all levels).   Eventually though you should come to the point where gross oversights become the exception rather than the rule...then you'll have ample opportunity to learn how many other ways there are to lose a game!

Where is this point that you're talking about? Like, is it a specific rating or something? I know that playing/practicing can help you overcome blunders, but when?

NubbyChessking

Anybody can make blunders.

I beat a 1300 in Blitz once, so they're gonna happen

Sushmit1

👍

Sred
NubbyChessking wrote:

Anybody can make blunders.

I beat a 1300 in Blitz once, so they're gonna happen

There have been obvious blunders in WC games. 1300 is a rating where you still see quite a lot of them.

Of course, it also depends on the time controls used. Less time, more blunders.

NubbyChessking

True, but you gotta remember the guy was like half my rating so