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Why do we win/lose so many points per game?

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snoozyman
Hello person from 11 years ago.
G0ldDrag0n5765

I think the rating of someone should be based on how well they play in a game not based on the win/lose ratio of the rating because there are people who play way better than it may seem and I think it would be best to rank them based on their gameplay and not their wins and losses.

justbefair
travisspears wrote:

I think the rating of someone should be based on how well they play in a game not based on the win/lose ratio of the rating because there are people who play way better than it may seem and I think it would be best to rank them based on their gameplay and not their wins and losses.

Yes, that would be great but it's not easily done.

This system is comparitively easy to use and produces statistically reliable results.

wormrose

It is partially due to the RD factor in the Gliko. By using Elo, the changes are smaller and therefor the rating is a truer indication of your playing level.

eric0022
travisspears wrote:

I think the rating of someone should be based on how well they play in a game not based on the win/lose ratio of the rating because there are people who play way better than it may seem and I think it would be best to rank them based on their gameplay and not their wins and losses.

 

But let's imagine for a moment.

 

(This is just a hypothetical example, do not follow this intentionally by losing pieces without good reason!)

 

Imagine I play as a relatively novice player. A complete newbie hangs his pieces all the way and I take advantage of every single blunder of his, and my moves are mostly the best ones.

 

I would have played "very well" simply because the opponent blundered. And I would gain many more rating points than I should have. It does not sound natural and logical to me.

 

Also, there would be a large difference in the rating outcome between resigning early and playing out games to checkmate if this happens.

 

And lastly, like Martin_Stahl mentioned...

 

...it would be a complex matter to introduce this idea.