Why the Bishop has cut on it's head?

Martin_Stahl
VladimirHerceg91 wrote:

Have you ever seen a bishop without a cut on his head? 


Yes.

VladimirHerceg91
Martin_Stahl wrote:
VladimirHerceg91 wrote:

Have you ever seen a bishop without a cut on his head? 


Yes.

I guess it takes two to tango. 

imsighked2

A jealous husband caught the bishop in a compromising situation with his wife and attacked the bishop with a sword.

Pulpofeira
batgirl escribió:
Pulpofeira wrote:
 

La leche.

mais pas la crème?

It is a way to express astonishment here. Sorry but French is like from another planet for me. :)

batgirl
MickinMD wrote:
manfred_scriba_ms07 wrote:

So I've been thinking a lot about Bishops and it's cut. Now my question to everyone is why the Bishop has a slash on its head?

As a Catholic who, in my youth, frequently served mass as an altar boy for the Auxiliary Bishop of Baltimore, I've always realized the cut in the chess piece represented the mitre or "hat" of the Bishop!

Then I'm sure you are aware that  Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence, had a cousin, John Carroll, who became not just the Bishop of Baltimore, but was the first Roman Catholic bishop in newly established United States of America.

batgirl
Pulpofeira wrote:
batgirl escribió:
Pulpofeira wrote:
 

La leche.

mais pas la crème?

It is a way to express astonishment here. Sorry but French is like from another planet for me. :)

I also find milk astonishing  :-D

imsighked2

Esteban_Garcia
In Spanish we still use the word "alfil" for the chess piece. It doesn't have any other meanings.
Dadg777

Isn't a mitre a type of saw?  Asking for a friend.

Strangemover

Dadg777 wrote:

Isn't a mitre a type of saw?  Asking for a friend.

No it's a brand of soccer ball.
Martin_Stahl
Dadg777 wrote:

Isn't a mitre a type of saw?  Asking for a friend.

 

Yes, it is a type of saw, for making angle cuts.

chessspy1

Hi Guys,

I can see this is a fairly light hearted discussion but.

Early Arabic pieces did have representational pieces, see the chess book of Alphonso the Wise, where a carved horse is clearly one of the pieces being made.

The bishops mitre may well have been introduced when the game was modified and 'wesrernised'in the 16th c. However the French still call that piece 'fool'

My article on the origin of the Staunton chess pieces tells almost all. Recent research which I will soon be publishing seems to show that the pawn shape is a common finial shape used infurniture for many centuries and adopted for the Staunton pattern by Nat Cook the designer of these pieces

robbie_1969

Actually Rook comes from the Persian Rukh, chariot and is mostly known in Hindi as hati (elephant) it makes no sense for the bishop a rather long range and fast moving piece to be represented by an elephant.  I have a set from Tunisia where the rooks are elephants and bishops are represented as pillars of a Greek style temple.

ilovesmetuna
the bishop is a pope that got demoted.
robbie_1969

le fou, the fool, presumably because it can only see things from a single perspective, its own?  Is it uncompromising single mindedness or unadulterated narcissism? A strength or a weakness, or both?

robbie_1969
Strangemover wrote:
Dadg777 wrote:

Isn't a mitre a type of saw?  Asking for a friend.

No it's a brand of soccer ball.

man i hated those Mitre footballs, they were always rock hard.

Strangemover

All teenage boys should experience being struck flush in the face by a mitre all surface football. It's character building.

robbie_1969

lol wink.png