Yusupov's award-winning Training Course

  • #141
    NativeChessMinerals wrote:

    I think an easy way for me to do this would be to save positions as pictures, their names can reference the chapter and exercise number. When viewing it as a randomized slideshow I won't be able to see where they came from.

    I like that idea.  

  • #142
    NativeChessMinerals wrote:
    ...

    And so far it's been like this chapter after chapter. I feel I could easily spend a year with just 3 of these books. I can't believe the low price.

    ...

     

    If you are doing them they way they were designed to be done, it should take a year per book

     

  • #143

    That may be closer to the pace he intended. I don't imagine he intended it to be as long as a year per book though.

    Although I suppose he does say that ideally you should be reading other books and playing in tournaments at the same time.

  • #144
    Martin_Stahl wrote:
    NativeChessMinerals wrote:
    ...

    And so far it's been like this chapter after chapter. I feel I could easily spend a year with just 3 of these books. I can't believe the low price.

    ...

     

    If you are doing them they way they were designed to be done, it should take a year per book

     

    It took this fellow about a month and a half to get through the first book (http://p-r4.blogspot.com/2015/03/yusupov-fundamentals-book-1-week-6.html).  This is consistent with my experience.  Actually, I'm a bit more of a zealot, possibly, and it took me about 1.5-3 hours per chapter, and I polished off the first three books in just under 4 months.  Considering that I worked through other content simultaneously, I imagine that the books can be passed through more quickly, but probably at the cost of retention.

     

    Kasparov's books --now those might take a year and more to go through.  I'll let you know in the next 12 months.  Smile

  • #145

    Oh, I went through the first three books pretty quickly, about a year total I think. I'm just saying the course was designed to be a year per book. I think the idea is that you should spend a lot more time on each chapter and really get to know the material.


    It would probably help if there was supplemental stuff to study, tied to each chapter and likely with a coach, the material could be added to make it last longer.

  • #146
    Martin_Stahl wrote:

    Oh, I went through the first three books pretty quickly, about a year total I think. I'm just saying the course was designed to be a year per book. I think the idea is that you should spend a lot more time on each chapter and really get to know the material.


    It would probably help if there was supplemental stuff to study, tied to each chapter and likely with a coach, the material could be added to make it last longer.

    I liked idea about re-traversing the material twice, as a rule.  I've never don that explicitly, except in instances where I covered a common topic in two books, such as Grooten's "Chess Strategy for the Club Player" and then Srokovski's book, both focusing on Steinitz' elements.

     

    Retention and ability to apply is the next tricky step, once one get all of those ideas into his/her head.  Lingering on the material for a year might be the idea behind the course's suggested speed, too.

  • #147

    I am curious as to how you guys study these books? Is it enough to read and study the examples before carefully analyzing the exercises? Or should you carefully analyze the positions given in the examples as well, approaching them as if they were test questions.

  • #148

    Yusupov gives instruction on how to use the books in the beginning of each book.

    The examples have diagrams. He says to look at the diagram first before reading the lesson and try to solve it for about 5 minutes, then read. He insists that all moves (main lines and variations) should be played on a physical board in front of you as you study the book.

    Then you do the test questions. He says if you get stuck then after 10-15 minutes (I'm assuming 10-15 minutes as there are 12 question he says may take 2 hours and some can be done faster than others) then you can move the pieces around and to check new ideas. The point isn't to brute force solve it, but to give an honest effort, and if you can't, then you simply learn from the solution.

    Solutions are given a point. If a solution was more difficult then additional points are given depending on how much you saw or understood. If you don't score well enough he says to redo the all the examples and the problems you got wrong.

    But this whole scoring thing is a bit of pageantry IMO. I think you should look at the ones you missed and any interesting ones you got right too regardless. The point isn't some arbitrary score, but to learn something new. (And for me, I usually have to see something multiple times anyway before I'm going to start recalling these things in place of old habits during a game.)

    Also, for me (he doesn't mention this), any instructional book should be read with note taking. As I go through the examples I write down anything I find especially interesting. Then at the end of each chapter I condense it into a bullet point list for quick review. If I especially want to remember something I star it. If something is a big weak point for me I use a highlighter. This makes review easier as I can turn to one page of notes and review what was most important to me.

    Typing this it sounds like overkill, but honestly I can read something while taking no notes, and it makes complete sense, and I love it, then a week later I'll barely remember it... certainly not enough to use it in a game. The act of writing helps me remember (and makes thoughts more concrete when you're forced to write it), and of course review helps too. And it doesn't take much time to do it.

  • #149

    Has anyone seen that there is a new book in the series out?  http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/products/2/272/revision_and_exam_1_by_artur_yusupov/

     

    It looks like this is a new book of test positions consisting of topics from the first three books.

     

    Hopefully there will two follow ups.

     

    My copy is on the way.

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