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I'm stuck at 1600

  • #21
    Master_Po skrev:

    Jean, you're probably better than me, but a 2300 player told me once, Stop Playing the Blitz games if you want to get better. (like a couple here have already said)  You've gotten about as good as you can get in blitz, but must play the long slow games, at least 30 mins per player, to learn more and deeper.  Yes, it's tough, you'll miss your crack cocaine of chess, the FAST games and will be super tempted to go back to them, but you must play the long slow ones.  THEN, that will spill over into all types of games.  That's IF, and a big IF, you really want to get better.  Some are satisfied where they are and really don't want to get better, or had rather not give up fast games to get better.   An aside, you may want to study Tal and Morphy's games and learn the art of the SACRIFICE.  Many players don't go further because they don't learn these 'breakthrough' type moves and they stagnate.  GM Williams has a good dvd out on learning to play like Tal, which will get you thinking in that mode, which can have a great impact on your game.   Good luck.  Let us know if you decided to give up the crack.  

    Well thansk for that! many players they've told me the samething. work with slower game if you want to improve your thinking, so i appreciate you giving me that useful knowledge! very glad!

  • #22

    My Elo is 1730 so Im not extremely strong but I hope I can help. I had a similar problem with eclipsing the 1500s. It took me a couple years and a dramatic iimprovement in tactics to finally do it. After I reached the 1600s, it took me maybe a month or a couple months to reach the 1700s. Players develop at different paces, Just focus on tactics and learning to improve your position and youll get there

  • #23
    ufhrufh skrev:

    My Elo is 1730 so Im not extremely strong but I hope I can help. I had a similar problem with eclipsing the 1500s. It took me a couple years and a dramatic iimprovement in tactics to finally do it. After I reached the 1600s, it took me maybe a month or a couple months to reach the 1700s. Players develop at different paces, Just focus on tactics and learning to improve your position and youll get there

    In that case I have nothing to worry about, what a relief then, thanks for your time!

  • #24
    jean-lucnahimana wrote:
    Jimmykay skrev:

    I started playing chess at age 19 and was about 1450 USCF almost immediately. 50 chess books and 30 years later, I am still only 1650 USCF. Who cares though?  Do you like playing?

    of course i love chess, I find this game to be very interesting. It was my older brother who had this game in mind for me. mamy years 'ive been rejecting this game claiming it to by only for older people. But boy what i had wrong   @jimmykay

     

     so just enjoy playing

  • #25

    I can't wait to get stuck at 1600. I've gotten "stuck" around 1400. I think I've realized I've spent too much time on openings and not enough on the middle- and end-game, so I've focused more on those two areas. Try to figure out where you are losing games and focus your efforts there. The computer analysis feature can help you figure out where you are going wrong in your losses.

  • #26

    No offense to Jimmy but I think he has the wrong attitude and his virtual non-improvement in chess is the result of his minimal effort.

     

    You can improve your chess if you work hard, then work harder. Understand that it will take a lot of sacrificing. And when you play better, you will enjoy the game more. But you have to be under no illusions of just how much work it will take. I respect Jimmy as a smart fella whom I talked with on different topics but, as I said, he has the wrong attitude towards chess. I hope I don't offend you with my opinion, Jimmy, I certainly don't mean to.

     

    My recommendation for you is to hire a competent coach who will be able to show you your strengths and weaknesses who will help you finding a good plan for improvement.

     

    If you can't afford to hire a competent coach, at least try to purchase the premium membership on this site. Videos are good and chess mentor is just great. Chess mentor will help you go through many interesting concepts and learn new things. I would like to stress that repeating lesson is very important to learning. Another thing I would like to add is to work systematically but not to the point of burning yourself up.

     

     

    I understand that I may not give the best ideas since, if you check my ratings, here there was very little improvement but I understand that this is because I haven't worked hard and systematically enough on my chess. Still, I hope that my ideas may be of some help to you and I wish you good luck with your improvement.

     

    But then, who knows, maybe you, upon evaluation of all pros and cons of chess improvement realize that it's a truly titanic endeavor and just play for the fun of it and that will be ok. But if you have decided to do your best to improve then do your very best and I am certain that you will improve.

  • #27
    SpiritoftheVictory skrev:

    No offense to Jimmy but I think he has the wrong attitude and his virtual non-improvement in chess is the result of his minimal effort.

     

    You can improve your chess if you work hard, then work harder. Understand that it will take a lot of sacrificing. And when you play better, you will enjoy the game more. But you have to be under no illusions of just how much work it will take. I respect Jimmy as a smart fella whom I talked with on different topics but, as I said, he has the wrong attitude towards chess. I hope I don't offend you with my opinion, Jimmy, I certainly don't mean to.

     

    My recommendation for you is to hire a competent coach who will be able to show you your strengths and weaknesses who will help you finding a good plan for improvement.

     

    If you can't afford to hire a competent coach, at least try to purchase the premium membership on this site. Videos are good and chess mentor is just great. Chess mentor will help you go through many interesting concepts and learn new things. I would like to stress that repeating lesson is very important to learning. Another thing I would like to add is to work systematically but not to the point of burning yourself up.

     

     

    I understand that I may not give the best ideas since, if you check my ratings, here there was very little improvement but I understand that this is because I haven't worked hard and systematically enough on my chess. Still, I hope that my ideas may be of some help to you and I wish you good luck with your improvement.

     

    But then, who knows, maybe you, upon evaluation of all pros and cons of chess improvement realize that it's a truly titanic endeavor and just play for the fun of it and that will be ok. But if you have decided to do your best to improve then do your very best and I am certain that you will improve.

    well-written my friend and I want to first and foremost clearify this fact, I believe that working hard will bring forth success. Surely no doubts about it but it's as you said the feeling for chess that makes you wan't to strive for betterness. I Think that Jimmy's reasoning is somewhat similar to ours, he probably thinks that if you do something you like you'll in most cases see improvement,

     

    and second of all, don't feel ashamed because everyone is entitled opinions.

  • #28

    to start with id go with the endgame as even many grandmasters dont know enough about it. its suprising how many games you can win. if you want a book try to get silmans endgame course it will teach you what you need to know to get to a master level in the endgame. Then id study tactics. study pawn structures as this will tell you how the pieces get their power. from pawns you get the outposts ,good and bad bishops the open files for rooks. the  passed pawns the plans for each side. happy.png

  • #29
    Strelka5 wrote:

    to start with id go with the endgame as even many grandmasters dont know enough about it. its suprising how many games you can win. if you want a book try to get silmans endgame course it will teach you what you need to know to get to a master level in the endgame. Then id study tactics. study pawn structures as this will tell you how the pieces get their power. from pawns you get the outposts ,good and bad bishops the open files for rooks. the  passed pawns the plans for each side.

    I've had Silman's endgame course and just started going through it after losing several games in which I had late advantages. It's interesting stuff.  Secrets of Pawn Endings by Frank Lamprecht and Karsten Müller is a great book.

  • #30
    imsighked2 wrote:
    Strelka5 wrote:

    to start with id go with the endgame as even many grandmasters dont know enough about it. its suprising how many games you can win. if you want a book try to get silmans endgame course it will teach you what you need to know to get to a master level in the endgame. Then id study tactics. study pawn structures as this will tell you how the pieces get their power. from pawns you get the outposts ,good and bad bishops the open files for rooks. the  passed pawns the plans for each side.

    I've had Silman's endgame course and just started going through it after losing several games in which I had late advantages. It's interesting stuff.  Secrets of Pawn Endings by Frank Lamprecht and Karsten Müller is a great book.

    I recommend reading "Secrets of 8 Rook Endgames" by IM A. Fake.

     

    While they are rare in ocurrance, as many pawns must be underpromoted to achieve the position, if you don't know those cold, you will surly lose your way with the ever faster time controls. You have to be able to master the techniques so you can rattle off the proper moves by only using the time increment. 

     

    The other books that comes to mind would be "How to occupy outposts with Pawns" by IM A. Idiot.

     

    Seriously, if you cannot properly handle pawns structures by occupying outposts with attacking pawns, you will not advance to the highest levels of chess. 

  • #31

    everyone i'll have to thank y'all for your comments. It's very pleasant to know that everything is alright as long as you follow these given steps that may for some people seem much, but according to me that's reachable. thank you alla for helping me!

  • #32
    Morphysrevenges wrote:
    imsighked2 wrote:
    Strelka5 wrote:

    to start with id go with the endgame as even many grandmasters dont know enough about it. its suprising how many games you can win. if you want a book try to get silmans endgame course it will teach you what you need to know to get to a master level in the endgame. Then id study tactics. study pawn structures as this will tell you how the pieces get their power. from pawns you get the outposts ,good and bad bishops the open files for rooks. the  passed pawns the plans for each side.

    I've had Silman's endgame course and just started going through it after losing several games in which I had late advantages. It's interesting stuff.  Secrets of Pawn Endings by Frank Lamprecht and Karsten Müller is a great book.

    I recommend reading "Secrets of 8 Rook Endgames" by IM A. Fake.

     

    While they are rare in ocurrance, as many pawns must be underpromoted to achieve the position, if you don't know those cold, you will surly lose your way with the ever faster time controls. You have to be able to master the techniques so you can rattle off the proper moves by only using the time increment. 

     

    The other books that comes to mind would be "How to occupy outposts with Pawns" by IM A. Idiot.

     

    Seriously, if you cannot properly handle pawns structures by occupying outposts with attacking pawns, you will not advance to the highest levels of chess. 

    You have some interesting pen-names. My, you are a prolific writer! Are your books on Amazon?

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