Comments


  • 6 weeks ago

    veryangryrook

    Good video

  • 8 months ago

    IM dpruess

    great :)

  • 8 months ago

    bolter41

    Very instructional, thanks David, I like your vids!

  • 22 months ago

    IM dpruess

    awesome! glad to hear you're starting to enjoy your endgame! (and that you appreciate Rubinstein).

  • 22 months ago

    Prawn2Bish4

    Mated by a pawn on the last variation, after the queen promotion,,, so sick, but so sweet.  These vids are helping me alot, as often I face opponents who often like to trade and simplify, which I hate, as I like a complex game. But then they seem to have no clue how to take advantage in endgame. Now I'm starting to kick butt, in endgame, thanks so much. Also Rubinstein is awesome!

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    glad you liked it :)

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    which move at what time in the video?

  • 3 years ago

    LilBillBiscuit

    on the move you said you could win a pawn, you actually lost because of Bc2. Is there any tactic that I don’t see?

  • 3 years ago

    LilBillBiscuit

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago

    IM dpruess

    very welcome :-)

  • 4 years ago

    greither

    Thank you.

  • 5 years ago

    theunderground702

    Thanks!

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    theunderground,

    f4 is a very plausible defensive move there. in general you don't want to advance the pawn next to your doubled pawns, because it reduces their mobility, leaving them weaker. so you usually advance f4, not e4 from this structure.

    this defense makes a lot of sense for the reason you give: keeping the black rook from attacking the h-pawn for the moment. however, black is still much better. advancing the weak pawns tends to give the king more different ways to enter and attack them eventually.

  • 5 years ago

    theunderground702

    At the 10-minute mark position, why doesn't White move the e or f pawn up one square, which would block the black rook from cutting across? He also wouldn't be able to cut across on the fifth rank, because c5 is under control. 

  • 5 years ago

    john-warner

    very good endgame lesson.thanks

  • 5 years ago

    AnlamK

    At about 5.25 in the video...

    After Bd3 ..Nxf2 Kxf2 ..Rxd3, doesn't White have Ne5 forking the Rd3 and Bg4?

    Edit: After Ne5, Black has ..Rd2+ but then Ke1?

    Edit2: Ok ok.. Black's fine. Final line:

    Bd3 ..Nxf2 Kxf2 ..Rxd3 Ne5 ..Rd2+ Ke1 ..Rxg2 Nxg4 ..Rxg4

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    hi, yes this is a beginner's video (u1300 uscf); there are plenty of intermediate players (1300-1700 uscf) who might not know this endgame, but the video should be accessible and understandable to a player rated between 1000 and 1300 uscf. your 1500 in correspondence might be 1300 or 1400 uscf, it's hard to know because correspondence and over the board are very different.

    you should definitely be able to understand this video, as far as my intentions go, so if you are not able to understand it, i need to make some adjustments. please give me any further feedback either here or by private message. thanks!

  • 5 years ago

    MrKems

    hi David

    first , i would like to thank u, very nice and clear 

    just wonder, is that a begginers video ? looks quite complicate :-( think i have to watch less complex videos ( im rated about 1500 in this site, can u ppl say what u think of it ? is it complicate only 4 me ??? )

    Thanks again, very interesting !

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    no special reason daghastly. it doesn't make a big difference which way he takes. the position is close to equal, but black's development lead still gives him a slight edge in the endgame, which could perhaps turn into a weaness (like the doubled pawns in the game) or dissipate into nothing.

  • 5 years ago

    daghastly12

    at 4:05 into the video, why capture with the rook instead of the bishop?

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