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Analysis help


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    Timothy_P

    I would really appreciate it if someone or several someones would help me analyze my games. Here's one in which I don't think I made any major blunders:



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    Elroch

    Your first mistake was to move the queen unnecessarily with 6. Qd3. This is a positional error: it lost time and also reduced mobility by blocking the king's bishop from c4 and b5. You may have been concerned that your queen could have been attacked on d4. While this is worth realising, this is not reason enough in itself to move a piece, especially a centralised piece. In this case, the only move that can threaten the queen is c5, which is a move that is bad for black, making the d-pawn backward and not helping the development of pieces.  Hence nothing to fear.

    I haven't given any analysis here beyond a move ahead. The reason for that is that before you analyse positions, you should always be thinking of positional factors like these.

    While 6. Qd3 is a significant positional error, it is not a losing move. But two or three such moves might lose a game with a strong player, so it matters. To look at it another way, if you gain a few positional advantages of this size, you should have a chance to win a game, so it is not insignificant. Smile

    Good luck!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    silentiarius



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    Timothy_P

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    I agree that an early Nc3 would have been a better choice in moves 6 or 7. And I don't think the Bg5 pin really accomplishes much, since it's so easily broken.

    9.Nd5 was a serious blunder! Black could have won a piece if he only knew how. After 10.Bxe7 Nxe7! (instead of Qxe7 as played in the game) and you have lost a piece for nothing. Study this little tactic! I have seen this particular blunder many, many times. People simply overlook that the Knight protects backwards! Master this tactic and many loose Knights will fall in your lap!

    You got a little lucky, didn't you? 32...Qf3 leads to an even game

    Yeah, I did get lucky (I do realize that the mate could easily have been prevented by, say, 32 ... Rf6!) but I had been pushing him pretty hard and thought he was getting frustrated. That night I set up a best case scenario with conditional moves. The next morning I found an e-mail that had arrived at 1:40 AM saying that I had won the game (my opponent lives in Ireland). No complaints! And thanks to all those posting!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    Kingpatzer

    Lots of blunders in this game.

    By way of one example, on move 30. Rg5 wins the queen the next move by force.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    Y_Ddraig_Goch

    Kingpatzer wrote:

    Lots of blunders in this game.

    By way of one example, on move 30. Rg5 wins the queen the next move by force.

    It actually just loses the rook for nothing to 30...hxg5.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    Kingpatzer

    Oops - d'oh! That'll show me to spin through a game and post an opinion in a few seconds.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    Timothy_P

    Y_Ddraig_Goch wrote:
    Kingpatzer wrote:

    Lots of blunders in this game.

    By way of one example, on move 30. Rg5 wins the queen the next move by force.

    It actually just loses the rook for nothing to 30...hxg5.

    Um... neither of his rooks could reach g5 on move 29 or 30. Mine could, but that would have lost the rook to the pawn. I am more than a little confused.

    EDIT: Never mind, I understand: Y_Ddraig_Goch said that already. Sorry.


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