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How do I deal with hyper-aggresive players?


  • 13 months ago · Quote · #1

    DarknisMetalDragon

    Whenever I play a player that keeps attacking and attacking, I end up blundering a piece because I miss a threat after having to deal with all these attacks and having to react. How do I deal with them?

    Someone on this site named I think markyourgravitygood was telling me about the reaction chess problem. I think he said he got that from Silman.

    So how do I stop their attacks? If not, how do I attack back? Or how am I supposed to defend? Just how should I deal with these types of players.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #2

    waffllemaster

    A dozen different positions could have a dozen different answers.  Sometimes you must defend passively, sometimes you can counterattack.

    Not that I think you care... I think you're just spamming topics.  But for those who may wonder this themselves that's my answer anyway.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #3

    Yaroslavl

    Please post one of your games with one of these hyper-aggressive players. Then we can help you with concrete examples.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #4

    Yaroslavl

    I just looked at your game with Macer75. On your 4th move you played 4...Bc5 totally ignoring White's double attack against your f7 pawn with his B and N. A much better move would been 4...d5. The combination used by White in this game is called the Fried liver Attack. There are many videos on YouTube that explain how to play the Fried Liver Attack from both sides.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #5

    Lady-Jane

    Bc5 is the Traxler Counterattack.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #6

    Yaroslavl

    I know the Traxler Counterattack. But maybe the OP doesn't. 4...d5 is more direct. Small steps at first.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #7

    DarknisMetalDragon

    Yaroslavl wrote:

    I know the Traxler Counterattack. But maybe the OP doesn't. 4...d5 is more direct. Small steps at first.

    I do know that counterattack. That's what I was doing. Macer75 isn't really a hyper-aggresive player.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #8

    bongcloudftw

    lol if you walk into the traxler, even a standard okish chess engine won't be able to analyse, let alone a human.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #9

    DarknisMetalDragon

    bongcloudftw wrote:

    lol if you walk into the traxler, even a standard okish chess engine won't be able to analyse, let alone a human.

    Who, me or the opponent?

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #10

    macer75

    Yaroslavl wrote:

    I just looked at your game with Macer75. On your 4th move you played 4...Bc5 totally ignoring White's double attack against your f7 pawn with his B and N. A much better move would been 4...d5. The combination used by White in this game is called the Fried liver Attack. There are many videos on YouTube that explain how to play the Fried Liver Attack from both sides.

    yeah... basically I play the fried liver whenever possible. Seems to work often enough at my level for it to be worthwhile.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #11

    adamstask

    waffllemaster wrote:

    Not that I think you care... I think you're just spamming topics.  But for those who may wonder this themselves that's my answer anyway.

    I've talked with him during games, and my sense of him is that he is super-sincere, asks a lot of good questions, and is not a spammer at all. A little common decency goes a long way sometimes. I'm disappointed in you wafflemeiser; in the past I had read posts of yours that I respected. That's really not cool. 

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #12

    qinns

    From possible moves select most passive/defensive and most agressive/offensive, play always the latter one.

    In case you still have trouble switch to former one 

    ;)

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #13

    waffllemaster

    adamstask wrote:
    waffllemaster wrote:

    Not that I think you care... I think you're just spamming topics.  But for those who may wonder this themselves that's my answer anyway.

    I've talked with him during games, and my sense of him is that he is super-sincere, asks a lot of good questions, and is not a spammer at all. A little common decency goes a long way sometimes. I'm disappointed in you wafflemeiser; in the past I had read posts of yours that I respected. That's really not cool. 

    Hmm, I thought he never responded in the topics he started.  I guess I misjudged him, my bad.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #14

    bean_Fischer

    Play 1. d4.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #15

    Raja_Kentut

    Try to counter-attack. For an aggressive player to succeed in his attack, he needs to have at least one of the followings:

    • Domination in the center, or the center is blocked.
    • Being ahead in development.

    It depend on which advantage he has, but if you are behind in development, you should try to close the center. This is to stall him, buying you time to catch up with your development. If you block the center, but you don't make an effort to catch up in your development, then it is pointless. You need to block the center and quickly develop your pieces.

    Once your pieces are ready, in order to permanently stop his attack, you need to counter-attack the center. If the center is heavily blocked and cannot be shaken, then the only alternative is to counter attack on the opposite flank. Then, it will become a race who can destroy the other faster.

    In addition, if you are cramped and he squeezes you, trade pieces.

    Of course, you need to watch out for tactical threats. At your level, tactic is probably more important than the strategic advice I gave you above. But it's good to know what to aim for from the big-picture, strategic point of view.

    Good luck.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #16

    Scottrf

    Bxf7 against the Traxler...

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #17

    johnyoudell

    If you and your opponent are under master strength then hyper aggression before all the pieces are developed need not worry you - in fact your opponent will be making a mistake. The original position has a great deal of defensive resilience so a premature attempt to rip it apart will fail if you can avoid mistakes. If you think about it this is self evident because a whole lot of time has been spent down the ages examining the opening and if a forced win had ever been found chess would have died out. But it didn't. :)

    If the hyper aggression takes place after your opponent has got all his pieces out then it may be sound - but also it may not. Defensive resource can be quite hard to find (as you have discovered) but you are likely to find opponents who, when you get a vigorous attack going, manage to make moves which surprise you and either stall your attack or produce threats which force you to break off the attack to fend off their counter attack. So defensive resource can often enough be found.

    How to avoid the oversights you describe?  Well, firstly, get a copy of Hitchhiker's Guide and keep it next to the board with DON'T PANIC in clear view. Secondly play a time control which gives you a bit of time. Don't play anything less than 15min and a ten second increment. Now a harder one. Try to keep your pieces decently harmonious. By which I mean that they tend to cover each other and don't find themselves off in some remote part of the board where they are isolated. Also try to avoid isolated or backward pawns - if you have one or two connected pawn masses your position is likely to be easier to defend than if your pawns are scattered up and down the board.

    What this amounts to is advice to develop your strategic, positional sense as well as your grasp of tactics. It can result in playing a touch boringly but what it does is prepare your defence to those pieces flying all over the board before they start doing so. And the way to defend will often be more easily seen (and take less time to find) if your opponent is having to be hyper aggressive in the face of a coherent position.

    Good luck.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #18

    adamstask

    Raja_Kentut wrote:

    Try to counter-attack. For an aggressive player to succeed in his attack, he needs to have at least one of the followings:

    Domination in the center, or the center is blocked. Being ahead in development.

    It depend on which advantage he has, but if you are behind in development, you should try to close the center. This is to stall him, buying you time to catch up with your development. If you block the center, but you don't make an effort to catch up in your development, then it is pointless. You need to block the center and quickly develop your pieces.

    Once your pieces are ready, in order to permanently stop his attack, you need to counter-attack the center. If the center is heavily blocked and cannot be shaken, then the only alternative is to counter attack on the opposite flank. Then, it will become a race who can destroy the other faster.

    In addition, if you are cramped and he squeezes you, trade pieces.

    Of course, you need to watch out for tactical threats. At your level, tactic is probably more important than the strategic advice I gave you above. But it's good to know what to aim for from the big-picture, strategic point of view.

    Good luck.

    wow, thanks. That's the first lesson in strategy I've actually understood. Thank you. 

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #19

    macer75

    zephyl wrote:
    ancor3 wrote:
    omargalanti wrote:

    d4 is the most annoying move

    i always let the game abort when somebody plays d4 on me

    Ofcourse everybody knows that avoiding one of the two major opening moves is the best way to improve your game. -_-

    What the? Sealed wow i laughed so hard seeing this comment Sealed sarcasm is so funny.

    Misuse of emoticons is also so funny

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #20

    QueenTakesKnightOOPS

    There's not a lot to add to johnyoudell's excellent post, but one observation I have made is that top level chess is becomming less aggressive in some openings. There must be a reason for it & I think the reason is that if hyper aggression fails then it fails big time & they lose. Personally I like playing against it at club level because they seldom use book openings, they take some basic tactics & wing it, often with a rapid 2 piece attack on the f7 pawn if you are black.

    So the best way to cope with it is to keep learning. When you replay your games & analyse them what are you finding? How could you have refuted the attack?

    Don't get sucked into playing weird openings to try & counter it, most hyper aggressive players a long on calculating power & short on theory so a weird opening won't bother them because they don't care what you play, their only goal is a rapid attack on your weakest point.

    If you care to post a game that you feel best demonstrates your problem I'm sure there are plenty of ppl who would help you analyse & learn from them


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