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Go VS Chess


  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #281

    DORAEMONCHESS

    ghostofmaroczy wrote:
    DORAEMONCHESS asserted:

    I predict the chess pieces will have no place to go to, since they're all surrounded. The surrounding will happen in the cneter.

    The knight can jump.

    Chess wins again.

    Eh? But go have all the territory surrounded so if the knight moves in to the territory, it's suicide, anyway

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #282

    Murgen

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #283

    LupinIIIPlaysChess

    Murgen wrote:

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

    Very True

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #284

    ArcadesGriffith

    Murgen escribió:

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

    yep, Go has a grat part of "knowledge of the game", thats why, when we teach someone, we always teach some basic techniques like ladder, geta and others tesujis ike those, simple to learn and teach, but so powerfull when well played ;)

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #285

    DORAEMONCHESS

    ArcadesGriffith wrote:
    Murgen escribió:

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

    yep, Go has a grat part of "knowledge of the game", thats why, when we teach someone, we always teach some basic techniques like ladder, geta and others tesujis ike those, simple to learn and teach, but so powerfull when well played ;)

    You're right, they're very powerful when well played

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #286

    petrip

    DORAEMONCHESS wrote:
    ArcadesGriffith wrote:
    Murgen escribió:

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

    yep, Go has a grat part of "knowledge of the game", thats why, when we teach someone, we always teach some basic techniques like ladder, geta and others tesujis ike those, simple to learn and teach, but so powerfull when well played ;)

    You're right, they're very powerful when well played

    just like pin, fork, skewer, x-ray defence etc...

     

    utilizing thicknesa and such concepts are unique ans hard to learn properly. They are easily explained

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #287

    DORAEMONCHESS

    petrip wrote:
    DORAEMONCHESS wrote:
    ArcadesGriffith wrote:
    Murgen escribió:

    Chess and Go are very different.

    How many different concepts are needed to be learnt to play each to an expert level?

    In Chess if one player knows a few techniques that the other doesn't it might not affect the outcome of the game, in Go if one player knowssome techniqus the other doesn't the are going to use them to beat the other player into the ground.

    yep, Go has a grat part of "knowledge of the game", thats why, when we teach someone, we always teach some basic techniques like ladder, geta and others tesujis ike those, simple to learn and teach, but so powerfull when well played ;)

    You're right, they're very powerful when well played

    just like pin, fork, skewer, x-ray defence etc...

     

    utilizing thicknesa and such concepts are unique ans hard to learn properly. They are easily explained

    Thickness, I feel, can be quite easy to learn and equip in play.

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #288

    finnen

    its go because........................... I dont know😧

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #289

    DORAEMONCHESS

    Finnen, what do you mean by you don't know?

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #290

    finnen

    by the way knife should be part of the list of pin, fork, skewer e.c.t😕

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #291

    finnen

    by the way knife should be part of the list of pin, fork, skewer e.c.t😕

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #292

    DORAEMONCHESS

    Knife? What chess tactic is that? Can you explain it to me in detail?

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #293

    ArcadesGriffith

    what is a knife or fork in chess??

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #294

    YeOldeWildman

    The knights are so small on most chess sets that they have to carry knives instead of swords...

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #295

    VULPES_VULPES

    ArcadesGriffith wrote:

    what is a knife or fork in chess??

    a fork is when a piece directly attacks two or more pieces at the same time

    knife is not a chess term

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #296

    ArcadesGriffith

    VULPES_VULPES escribió:
    ArcadesGriffith wrote:

    what is a knife or fork in chess??

    a fork is when a piece directly attacks two or more pieces at the same time

    knife is not a chess term

    Oh, so placing the knight to check but attempting to capture the turret at the same time is a fork, did i get it?

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #297

    VULPES_VULPES

    ArcadesGriffith wrote:
    VULPES_VULPES escribió:
    ArcadesGriffith wrote:

    what is a knife or fork in chess??

    a fork is when a piece directly attacks two or more pieces at the same time

    knife is not a chess term

    Oh, so placing the knight to check but attempting to capture the turret at the same time is a fork, did i get it?

    Yes, assuming by "turrent", you mean "rook".


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