The Spectacular Winning Queen Sacrifice Chess Computers Don't Understand - Gusev vs. Auerbach, 1946

The Spectacular Winning Queen Sacrifice Chess Computers Don't Understand - Gusev vs. Auerbach, 1946

SamCopeland
NM SamCopeland
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It's not often that humans outperform chess computers these days, but it DOES happen. Check out the incredible 23.Qxe5!! from Gusev vs. Auerbach, 1946. This queen sac proves to be the only forced win available, but chess engines don't see it!

This move has a fascinating history, as it was played in a minor Soviet tournament and was not always so famous, but it has gained attention over the years as analysts have puzzled over whether the move is clearly winning or not. Computer chess enthusiasts have been particularly interested in the engine's assessment of the move and whether they can solve the position. Most engines can't

The answer is, "Yes!" The moves does win, but only with difficult and accurate play. Here is the proof from the user "Vass" on the ChessPub forums.

Top 10 Games of the 1940s

The game initially opens questionably as White pushes forward with 11.g4? Black could seize the advantage, but frankly cowardly play allows White's aggression to go unpunished as White moves forward with almost every opportunity.

Just as it appears White had gone too far, and will lose the e6-pawn and the advantage, White uncorks the brilliant 24.Qxe5!! This move wins the game, but it only does so by force if White finds the subtle 28.a4!! Black misses the last chance, taking on b3 and pushing ...a5, and White soon wins.

My annotations are below. Please don't simply cite a computer evaluation to refute my analysis. The engines don't understand this sacrifice!

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