If there were only 1 chess book you could reccomend what would it be ?

  • #141

    I'm surprised no one has mentioned Nunn's "Understanding Chess Middlegames."

    It covers a lot of ground in a way that is completely accessable to the average class player. It's very well written. While it's not comprehensive, what is offered is entirely usable. 

  • #142
    Kingpatzer wrote:

    I'm surprised no one has mentioned Nunn's "Understanding Chess Middlegames."

    It covers a lot of ground in a way that is completely accessable to the average class player. It's very well written. While it's not comprehensive, what is offered is entirely usable. 


    Kool avatar...and also thanks for reply....astonished you read through all posts...

  • #143

    Hey, did you ever decide on what book to order or has this thread only dented your wallet?

  • #144
    Benedictine wrote:

    Hey, did you ever decide on what book to order or has this thread only dented your wallet?

    lol....I have (2) thus far Polga'r page #7...and Max Euwe/Walter Meiden Chess Master vs. Chess Amateur...

    the good thing is the thread doesnt go away...so I can always skim through and get book ideas....

  • #145

    Yes I have the Polgar book beside my bed. I use it as a reachable tactics book, general purpose, as well as letting it double for an offensive weapon in case of burglars (the thing is massive). I have the Chess Master vs Chess Amateur on my 'wish list' in Amazon as it sounds good.

    The only thing I have against tactics book such as the Polgar one and any one of that sort, is for example out of the 5 thousand tactics in that book, 5 thousand of them are mates - i.e. attacking chess. So where are the defensive tactics? Still it is a good book because of the sheer numbers, but do these books only develop one side of our tactical game?

  • #146

    I agree^...I guess he has one just as big for defensive tactics

  • #147

    I think you can borrow from the library most of the books mentioned in the thread. No need to hurt your wallet.

  • #148

    ^ Very true....did you have a book suggestion...???

  • #149

    The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal. This may not be the best but it's enjoyable to read.

  • #150
    Mandy711 wrote:

    The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal. This may not be the best but it's enjoyable to read.


    thank you

  • #151
    Vease wrote:
    -waller- wrote:

    I have Chernevs "Most Instructive Games Ever Played", solely because my dad used to own it (he doesn't play much chess either), but I thought it was a half decent book. Certainly was fun to read through at least.

    Yes, you can learn a lot of basic strategy from that book. The problem with Chernev is that he gives the impression that every game reduces to the conversion of a basic positional advantage to a straightforward win. He rarely gives any lines showing how the loser could have played better so you just get a one sided view of the game.

    Yeah, that's definitely true.  I just read over that book again recently and noticed that time and again.  And saying stuff like "Already on the 5th move Black sows the seeds of his strategic defeat"...

  • #152
    Mandy711 wrote:

    The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal. This may not be the best but it's enjoyable to read.

    Then again, maybe it is the best. Smile

  • #153
    pfren wrote:

    Any book on Capa is a sure shot. Even Chernev's on his 60 best endings. Factly, it may be the sole good book Chernev ever issued.

    He did do at least one other enjoyable one (even though he did go a bit exclam-happy throughout):

  • #154

    My personal favourite is "Best Lessons of a Chess Coach" by Sunil Weeramantry (I think that he's one of Nakamura's trainers).

  • #155
    AndyClifton wrote:
    Mandy711 wrote:

    The Life and Games of Mikhail Tal. This may not be the best but it's enjoyable to read.

    Then again, maybe it is the best. 

    What rating would this book be appropriate for?  I like Tal, just worried the book might be too advanced.  I've not seen a preview, so it's hard to tell...

  • #156

    I think you should probably be a B-player.

  • #157

    I don't think you need a specific chess rating to enjoy Tal's book. If you have a high school reading ability, you should enjoy his stories. One of the greatest aspects of Life and Games is that Tal makes you want to study his games! His book is inspirational, not just educational.

    Mikhail Tal's love of the game is infectious, which is why it's a perennial candidate for best chess book ever written. His audience was every chess lover, not players above a certain rating.

  • #158
    Oraoradeki wrote:

    My personal favourite is "Best Lessons of a Chess Coach" by Sunil Weeramantry (I think that he's one of Nakamura's trainers).

    Or maybe his father

  • #159

    step-father and his trainer.

  • #160

    I'd point to Reti's Masters of the Chessboard, which gives an intelligent and broad perspective on chess. Was a real eye-opener for me.

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