I can’t open properly,any tips?

SparkyIsBadAtChess
I can’t seem to get past the opening
kindaspongey

"... For beginning players, [Discovering Chess Openings] will offer an opportunity to start out on the right foot and really get a feel for what is happening on the board. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf

candido1

I just looked at your games. This is not revolutionary advice but try these three things before your 10th move:

 

1. get your E or D pawn (or both!) in the center of the board

2. Develop your Knights and bishops from the back rank (don't move them more than once)

3. Castle, castle, castle. Literally force yourself to castle. Don't think you need to castle in a particular game? Don't listen to yourself. Castle again. You'll figure out later when you don't need to. For now, 95% of the time, you want to castle early.

nartreb

In addition to what candido said, try this (as white OR black)

move 1.  move king's knight

2.  push king's knight's pawn (one square only)

3.  move king's bishop to square just vacated by pawn

4.  castle.

The above is safe no matter what your opponent does.  (Don't play with your eyes closed; if your opponent makes a huge blunder, you can interrupt your plan long enough to take his queen or whatever.)  Your king should now be safe.  Go back to Candido's list and do as much of the rest of it as you can.  (You may find that your opponent's pawns have grabbed the center of the board and you can't dislodge them.  That's fine.  Develop your pieces first, then you're ready to start trading in the center.  With any luck your opponent hasn't castled yet, so opening up the center is a big advantage for you.)

 

Oh, and one more tip:  STOP PLAYING BLITZ!  You'll never learn a thing if you don't slow down.  Your last game is a classic example of something you should never allow, just stop and look at the board: which squares is his bishop attacking after move 3? So his plan should be obvious when he moves his queen.  When he moves his queen, a better reply is g3.  Always counterattack if you can!  You even resign too early.  Your fifth move is forced: Kd3.  What's his reply?    Don't get me wrong, your position is ugly, but you're not dead yet!  He gets a pawn and an ongoing attack, but don't worry, he can still mess up.  Half of chess is keeping your nerve when things get ugly or complicated.  Stop and think, don't just assume the game is over.  

Deep_Kanor52

i just saw you games, figured you are just new to chess (the way you move those pieces) so i would like to suggest: read a beginners book or watch online tutorials a lot of them are vastly available online. you can go to youtube and just type in "chess opening principles for beginners" and start watching. you'll find that what you can learn from those videos are definite opening moves way different from the way you play now. And when you finally get the idea you will notice improvement on the way you  play. And may i also suggest you avoid playing blitz for now. play the longer time set on Rapid so you can think and analyze without too much pressure. In time you will get better. 

SparkyIsBadAtChess
Thx guys! I think I’m getting a little bit better now!
BoboTheFlyingSheep67
SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote:
I can’t seem to get past the opening

Here, I wrote two blogs on it....

https://www.chess.com/blog/BoboTheFlyingSheep67 

(scroll to the bottom two blogs happy.png)

Also, there are some other cool blogs you might want to check out, such as tactics - a crucial aspect of the middle game 

DaniilKalabukhov

I suggest you concentrating on 2 opening principles: 1) control the center with your pawns or pieces (both is the best); 2) develop all your pieces. And also I suggest you applying main strategical principle: make sure that all of your pieces are doing something, and keep your king safe.

CoffeeAnd420
kindaspongey wrote:

"... For beginning players, [Discovering Chess Openings] will offer an opportunity to start out on the right foot and really get a feel for what is happening on the board. ..." - FM Carsten Hansen (2006)
https://web.archive.org/web/20140627114655/http://www.chesscafe.com/text/hansen91.pdf

 

Man...you never give up on this, do you? LOL

If you can't get past the opening without blowing the game (often), you probably can't even read a book to begin with. 

CoffeeAnd420
SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote:
I can’t seem to get past the opening

 

Because your entire perspective of the endgame is wrong and you also over complicate your idea of what the opening is. You need a plan - which at your level is to simply and absolutely stick to the opening rules of don't move the same piece twice in the opening, establish a strong center, castle, and control as much time/space as possible. You want to think of the four center squares in the board as a hill. The high ground in a battle. You need to establish control of those and then assess where your opponents and your own weaknesses lie. Do *not* just push pawns and pieces up the board. You control squares with influence, not by occupying squares with your pieces. Your pawn structure should be well established while leaving you space to move your pieces around and denying your opponent space to move to the squares he wants to occupy, control, etc. Do not chase pawns around in the opening, do not formulate plans that take 2+ moves to set in place since by the time you get there, the opportunity you were chasing is gone. Form a sound, concrete position and then decide how you want to proceed into the middle game. Last, but most importantly of course - King safety. Nothing on the board matters if you allow the opponent to mate your king. If he attacks your kingside with his queen and minor pieces early, just play sound moves and don't let him mate you. His attack will fail, you'll be ahead in development and have a better position, and you'll have basically "won" the opening. Now it's time proceed into the middlegame. Of course, all of this is oversimplifying things to a massive degree but again, you have to have a foundation in place. 

Billyj1

try looking up the king's gambit

tomboychessgirl

SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote:

Thx guys! I think I’m getting a little bit better now!

SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote: T hx guys! I think I’m getting a little bit better now!

tomboychessgirl

SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote:

Thx guys! I think I’m getting a little bit better now!

SparkyIsBadAtChess wrote: T hx guys! I think I’m getting a little bit better now!

BALAJIBAJALI

which coin can I move first that it should have a trap

Daybreak57
In one of your games you resigned in a winning position. I was eight years old when I started playing, and I’m sure I was just as bad as you when I started out. I was probably worse. To begin with, its normal to lose in the opening at that rating. The games at that level are full of blunders and whoever makes the last decisive blunder usually loses.

The only thing you can do to improve is the same thing that everyone else will tell you. Play a lot of games against higher rated opponents. Analyze your games after you finish to find out what you did wrong preferably with a higher rated player. Check your games with an engine after you analyze them yourself. Do lots of tactics. Play through annotated master games. (Logical chess move by move is a good book for this). Study the basic endgames from the simple ones to harder ones like king and pawn endgames. Develop an opening repertoire. And above all else, learn the skill of trying to figure out the best possible move in the position. Look for your opponents threats and consequences after everyone of his move. There is a consequence to every move you make, learn how to spot them and you will be well on your way to improve. Learn to make a 10-15 move to do list. In that list you must figure out what you want your pieces to realize in the position. For the first 15 moves its usually develop develop develop unless your opponent blunders. Later on you will have to try develop an attack on the enemy king. There are different factors that come into play when you are trying to think up of a way to attack. I will tell you just one factor, and that is, central control. If your opponent doesn’t have central control then you have a good indicator that an attack with your pieces might work. You’ll be surprised how many people I played at even my rating that neglect a good pawn center and allow themselves to be controlled by two pawns of their opponent.

idontknowchess76

have you tried unzipping your zipper?

RussBell

Chess Openings Resources for Beginners and Beyond...

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/openings-resources-for-beginners-and-beyond

Good Chess Openings Books For Beginners and Beyond...

https://www.chess.com/blog/RussBell/good-chess-openings-books-for-beginners-and-beyond

kindaspongey

Some of us think that it can be useful to use books like First Steps: 1 e4 e5 and First Steps: Queen's Gambit
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7790.pdf

https://chesscafe.com/book-reviews/first-steps-1-e4-e5-by-john-emms/
https://www.newinchess.com/media/wysiwyg/product_pdf/7652.pdf
as sources of games with explanations intended for those just starting to learn about an opening.