The Way of the Goldfish: A simple method for beginners to improve rapidly!

benhunt72

I think this may be the single most valuable tip I can offer beginners and improving players.

Most of the mistakes that cause frustration are due to simply not being aware of everything that is going on on the board. This "goldfish" technique will help you to slow down and simply make fewer errors!

Bill_Filby

Thanks very much for this, Ben.  Exactly what I need to move myself from mid-900s doldrums into 4-figure territory...!

schnappy1212

Great stuff Ben, keep going!

benhunt72

Thanks guys. I think this is crucial for people who are at the stage of trying to cut out blunders (me included).

Thrafgig

mindful chess.  Interesting practice, I like it a lot, it makes total sense.

SagginSwirls

One of those things that you need to hear from someone else for it to stick.

Elpiji3kG

thanks Ben,, great video

Jdnielsen
Unfortunately I don’t see any video or content. Wonderful if someone can guide me to way of the gold fish
Thrafgig
Jdnielsen wrote:
Unfortunately I don’t see any video or content. Wonderful if someone can guide me to way of the gold fish

try this link to the YouTube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ib4KyTGjDcs&ab_channel=ChessBootCamp

flyingpuppydog

Thanks, Ben!

Burnt_toast2020

Ben, another great video, I enjoy watching them daily. not sure if it was this one or another but the coffee cup is huge

Antonin1957

Thank you for posting this very useful video. I will try to incorporate your method into my own play. My problem is that for several decades I had a career that required a particular type of mental focus that is exactly the opposite of what I need to play chess. 

Your advice to move past what happened before and see the entire board as it is now, for your current move, is simple, but very good advice. I will try to use it.

Raconcan

thank you :)

blueemu

I'm more of a codfish kind of guy.

Novocastrian4

Thanks. Can this method be applied to shorter games such as rapid 10 mins or 15/10?

Moonwarrior_1

Intresting 

Wildekaart

And beginners definitely have time for this in a rapid/blitz game. jk.

Beginners especially should play slow-paced games to improve their understanding of the game. This will certainly help them.

benhunt72
Novocastrian4 wrote:

Thanks. Can this method be applied to shorter games such as rapid 10 mins or 15/10?

Definitely 15+10, and probably 10-minute as well, assuming you can do it fairly quickly. Bottom line is this: you should be doing this consciously until such a time as you can do it more automatically. And the simple fact is you need time in which to do that.

Antonin1957
benhunt72 wrote:
Novocastrian4 wrote:

Thanks. Can this method be applied to shorter games such as rapid 10 mins or 15/10?

Definitely 15+10, and probably 10-minute as well, assuming you can do it fairly quickly. Bottom line is this: you should be doing this consciously until such a time as you can do it more automatically. And the simple fact is you need time in which to do that.

I always play longer games. The only games I have played here are 3-day move games. I need time to think--I'm just too old to feel anything but anxiety trying to play rapid games, live games, blitz or any of that stuff. 

My difficulty is that after the first few moves my game just falls apart. I have a lot of trouble "seeing" the board, seeing what my opponent is trying to do, implementing a coherent plan of my own. 

Your method is quite simple, and *should* be a matter of common sense, but it is something I have to make a real effort to implement because of the way I applied my mind to my old career. I have to adjust my way of thinking. 

I even have trouble doing "easy" level puzzles, especially those that ask you to figure out "mate in 3 moves" or "find the best move." I get frustrated very, very quickly. My old brain is just tired. 

benhunt72

Antonin1957, I actually struggle with daily formats, because I lose my feel for the flow of the game. I think that daily can actually help with the goldfish discipline, in principle, as you approach the board with a fresh perspective each time. It's odd that I find it harder than rapid.